Irish Golden Globe® Nominations

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Colin Farrell received a Golden Globe® nomination (Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy) for his performance in The Lobster.

Ruth Negga was also nominated (Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama) for her performance in Jeff Nichols’s Loving, which is on its way into Irish cinemas 3rd Feb 2017.

John Carney’s Sing Street received a nomination for best comedy or musical film.

And Caitriona Balfe has been nominated for best actress in a TV series for the sci-fi drama Outlander.

Speaking on Colin Farrell’s nomination, Element Pictures producer Ed Guiney commented: “We are delighted that Colin’s brilliant performance in The Lobster has been recognised by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, it’s so richly deserved.”

The Lobster grossed over €2 million in the UK/Irish box-office and took almost $10 million in the US.

The Lobster is directed by Yorgos Lanthimos and written by Lanthimos and Efthimis Filippo, produced by Ed Guiney, Lee Magiday, Ceci Dempsey and Yorgos Lanthimos. Executive Producers are Andrew Lowe, Tessa Ross and Sam Lavender.  Alongside Colin Farrell, the film features Rachel Weisz, Lea Seydoux, John C Reilly, Ben , Olivia Colman and Michael Smiley.

Colin Farrell, Yorgos Lanthimos and Ed Guiney will re-unite for their next project The Killing of A Sacred Deer, which was shot in Cincinnati this Autumn.  Nicole Kidman also stars as the wife of Farrell’s character.

The 74th annual Golden Globe® awards will take place on January 8th.

Best Motion Picture – Drama
Hacksaw Ridge
Hell Or High Water
Lion
Manchester By The Sea
Moonlight

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Rami Malek
Bob Odenkirk
Matthew Rhys
Liev Scrieibler
Billy Bob Thornton

Best Director – Motion Picture:
Damien Chazelle
Tom Ford
Mel Gibson
Barry Jenkins
Kenneth Lonergan

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Annette Bening
Lily Collins
Hailee Steinfeld
Emma Stone
Meryl Streep

Best Television Series – Drama
The Crown
Game Of Thrones
Stranger Things
This Is Us
Westworld

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
20th Century Women
Deadpool
La La Land
Florence Foster Jenkins
Sing Street

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Ruth Negga
Amy Adams
Jessica Chastain
Isabelle
Natalie Porton

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Casey Affleck
Joel Edgerton
Andrew Garfield
Viggo Mortensen
Denzel Washington

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Anthony Anderson
Gael Garcia Bernal
Donald Glover
Nick Nolte
Jeffrey Tambor

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series – Drama
Caitriona Balfe
Claire Foy
Keri Russell
Winona Ryder
Evan Rachel Wood

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture
Viola Davis
Naomie Harris
Nicole Kidman
Octavia Spencer
Michelle Williams

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Colin Farrell
Ryan Gosling
Hugh Grant
Jonah Hill
Ryan Reynolds

Best Original Song – Motion Picture
Cant Stop The Feeling, Trolls
City Of Stars, La La Land
Faith, Sing
Gold, Gold
How Far I’ll Go, Moana

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Riz Ahmed, The Night Of
Bryan Cranston, All The Way
Tom Hiddleston, The Night Manager
John Turturro, The Night Of
Courtney B Vance, The People Vs OJ

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Atlanta
Black-ish
Mozart In The Jungle
Transparent
Veep

Best Original Score – Motion Picture
Moonlight
La La Land
Arrival
Lion
Hidden Figures

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Olivia Colman, The Night Manager
Lena Heady, Game Of Thrones
Chrissy Metz
Mandy Moore
Thandie Newton, Westworld

Best Motion Picture – Animated
Kubo and the Two Strings
Moana
My Life As A Zucchini
Sing
Zootopia

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Felicity Huffman, American Crime
Riley Keough
Sarah Paulson
Charlotte Rampling
Kerry Washington, Confirmation

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Sterling K Brown
Hugh Laurie
John Lithgow
Christian Slater
John Travolta

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language
Devine
Elle
Neruda
The Salesman
Toni Erdmann

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Rachel Bloom
Julia Louis-Dreyfus
Sarah Jessica Parker
Issa Rae
Gina Rodriguez
Tracee Ellis-Ross

Best Limited Series
American Crime
The Dresser
The Night Manager
The Night Of
The People V OJ Simpson

Best Original Screenplay
La La Land
Nocturnal Animals
Moonlight
Manchester By The Sea
Hell Or High Water

 

 

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Irish Film Review: The Lobster

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DIR: Yorgos Lanthimos • WRI: Yorgos Lanthimos, Efthymis Filippou • PRO: Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Yorgos Lanthimos, Lee Magiday • DOP: Thimios Bakatakis • ED: Yorgos Mavropsaridis • DES: Jacqueline Abrahams • CAST: Colin Farrell, Léa Seydoux, Rachel Weisz

 

Yorgos Lanthimos’ The Lobster can be perceived to be any number of things – surreal comedy,  dystopian sci-fi, romance, drama, prison thriller – and all these genres it may be, but these are just the surface stylings of a director who has given one of the sharpest relationship satires in recent years. It’s like an Owen Wilson rom-com, doused in David Lynch’s bitter coffee and peppered with British absurdist humour. The movie is silly and ridiculous, but at times can demonstrate subtle poignancy and moments of graphic violence. It’s a postmodern dark comedy, where the world has fallen under a sort of Tinder fascism. It’s as if the dating app got sponsored by Hugo Boss and started whistling Wagner, wingmen becoming spies, and mothers Gestapo. A world where being single is a crime and if your relationship is on the rocks, you’re sentenced to be a parent. This is the world that Lanthimos has created for us and it’s a riot.

It takes a while for The Lobster to break out of its shell because it’s so different from conventional relationship comedies; heck, it’s even off the wall for most offbeat comedies. You start to wonder if it is trying too hard, using its quirkiness as compensation for humour, but soon you succumb to Lanthimos’ charm and it’s hard to deny his sheer dedication to his vision. He goes all the way with it unapologetically and that in itself becomes admirable.

The Lobster stars Colin Farrell as David, the only character given a Christian name as the rest of the cast are merely named after their job role or physical attribute. The film is narrated by Rachel Weisz, who doesn’t actually appear in the story until well into the second act. David is a tubby shell of a man with a thick moustache that suits his introvert personality. His wife has left him for another man, and in the world of The Lobster this now disqualifies David from living in general society and he is relocated to a hotel outside the city.

At the hotel he has 45 days to find a partner or he will be downgraded to another species of his choice. He chooses a lobster, which is an excellent choice according to the Hotel Manager (Olivia Colman), who explains most singletons choose dogs, hence why dogs are so common. The hotel boasts an array of eccentric characters – Lisping Man (John C. Reilly), Limping Man (Ben Whishaw), Biscuit Woman (Ashley Jensen) and Heartless Woman (Angeliki Papoulia) – all of which add to the bizarre.

Their activities include swimming, dancing, seminars and hunting the Loners in the woods. The Loners are people, who refuse to conform to society’s relationship pressures. They are single fundamentalists, who are planning a revolt. Both the Loners in the forest and the guests/inmates of the hotel must abide to a strict set of rules. In the Loner tribe one must not kiss or they shall have their lips cut off. In fact they don’t allow any fraternising at all, only a healthy diet of techno music and masturbation. Reminds me of college… hell it reminds me of last weekend. The hotel on the other hand forbids masturbation, which the Lisping Man finds out in a sadistic way involving a toaster.

There’s also forms of torture carried out every morning for the male inmates. Torture by grind. The maids grind up against the men to the moment right before they make spectacles of themselves and then stop. This is obviously why so many find it difficult to get around rule no.1. There are scenes of disturbing violence involving toasters, suicides and nosebleeds that are more effective than some horror movies. The film’s surreal humour delivered in deadpan dialogue might go over some people’s heads, especially when blended with the moments of extreme violence. However, if you’re a fan of British absurd comedy such as Brass Eye or Look Around You, then you’ll feel right at home.

Although, it isn’t necessarily the abstract that gets the biggest laughs. The biting satire and attention to detail is what rates high on the LOL scale. The focus of a relationship built on lies marks the funniest moments in The Lobster. Like when the Limping Man, out of sheer desperation, smashes his face off hard objects so it appears he has more in common with the Nosebleed Woman (Jessica Barden). Or when David must pretend to be a despicable and cynical human being in order to match up with the Heartless Woman. The surreal and extreme circumstances reflect a certain breed of people in our society. It illustrates insecurity among us, who pretend to be someone we’re not in order to escape loneliness.

When David is caught for his deceptions he escapes the hotel and joins the Loners. This is where we finally meet our narrator, the Shortsighted Woman, who David becomes extremely fond of. During their routine drills, preparing for the revolt, Shortsighted Woman and David genuinely fall in love, naturally in a loveless community. They must reserve their feelings or they could face a worse fate than slashed lips. The Loner Leader (Lea Seydoux) is a French Resistance type commander, who keeps a close eye on the secret couple. David and Shortsighted woman disguise their emotions through a communication of complex sign language. They camouflage themselves against the damp bark of the forest trees, as more and more animals pass them by as if they were in the Garden of Eden.

The Loners sometimes take trips to the city. Actually, they’re more like secret missions as they go undercover as couples to blend in with society. These scenes are reminiscent of science fiction such as The Invasion of the Body Snatchers or Soylent Green. Between moments of outlandish humour, disturbing violence and Big Brother-style paranoia, The Lobster still finds time for occasional tenderness between David and Shortsighted Woman, as their battle against everyone makes their love enduring.

It is quite a miracle Lanthimos got this film to work. Not because of how leftfield it is, but because of the amount of international input that excels in it. A Greek director, British, Irish, American and Dutch producers, shot in Ireland and with a plateau of multinational actors. The question isn’t really how did a film like this get made, but rather how could a film like this be so funny.

Going into The Lobster, I was slightly pessimistic and, truth be told, it took some time for me to warm up to it. Not that I didn’t get it, but my confidence in Colin Farrell was shaky at best. In my experience, he can be hit or miss with comedy, unless he has a strong writer behind him. Admittedly, not knowing much anything about Yorgos Lanthimos only served to heighten my suspicions. But I fell victim to its charm, and although it demands a second viewing, The Lobster will remain one of the most interesting movies of the year and originally fresh comedy in years.

   Cormac O’Meara

15A (see IFCO for details)

118minutes

The Lobster is released 16th October 2015

 

 

 

 

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Capital Irish Film Festival: Audio Interview with producer Dave Farrell & actor Colin Farrell of ‘A Terrible Beauty’

A Terrible Beauty 1 (1).jpg.opt560x319o0,0s560x319Image: Hugh O’Conor

A Terrible Beauty/Áille an Uafáis screened at the Capital Irish Film Festival (5 – 8 February).  The 93-minute feature docudrama set during the Irish Rebellion of 1916 tells the largely untold story of displaced young men, women and children caught up in a chain of events which would have tragic consequences leaving many innocent people dead.

Adam McPartlan talks to producer Dave Farrell and actor Colin Farrell, who plays Frank Shouldice, about the film.

Interviews from the festival:

Capital Irish Film Festival: Audio Interview with Sinéad O’Brien, director of ‘Blood Fruit’

Capital Irish Film Festival: Audio Interview with Anne Anderson, the 17th Ambassador of Ireland to the United States

Capital Irish Film Festival: Audio Interview with Paddy Meskell, Chairman of the Board of Solas Nua

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On The Reel At The IFTAs

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Lynn Larkin (second left) closes in on Fassbender’s IFTA

On the Reel’s Lynn Larkin, in association with Film Ireland, hits the red carpet in her blue guna and and gets in among the celebs at the Irish Film and Television Awards ceremony, which took place at the DoubleTree by Hilton venue in Dublin 4 on Saturday, 5th April 2014.

Check out the video below and get the low-down on the night from Michael Fassbender, Colin Farrell, Liam Cunningham, Will Forte, Mary Murray, Amy Huberman,  Andrew Scott, Fionnula Flanagan, Antonia Campbell-Hughes

 

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‘The Lobster’ Starts Shooting

element-pictures

Element Pictures have announced that principal photography started last week on The Lobster, the first English language film by Yorgos Lanthimos, whose Dogtooth won numerous international awards and was nominated for the Oscar® for Best Foreign Language Film. Shooting takes place over seven weeks on location in Ireland.

 

John C. Reilly, Ashley Jensen, Michael Smiley and Jessica Barden join the previously announced Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz, Ben Whishaw, Léa Seydoux, Olivia Colman, Ariane Labed and Angeliki Papoulia.

 

A love story set in the near future where single people, according to the rules of The City, are arrested and transferred to The Hotel.  There they are obliged to find a matching mate in 45 days.  If they fail, they are transformed into an animal of their choosing and released into The Woods.  A desperate Man escapes from The Hotel to The Woods where The Loners live and falls in love, although it is against their rules.

 

The Lobster is co-written by Lanthimos and his long-time collaborator, award-winning Efthimis Filippou.

 

It is being produced by Element Pictures, Limp and Scarlet Films. Producers on the film are Lanthimos, Lee Magiday, Ed Guiney and Ceci Dempsey, with Element’s Andrew Lowe and Film4’s Tessa Ross and Sam Lavender acting as executive producers. Isabel Davis is the lead executive for the BFI Film Fund, and Rory Gilmartin for Bord Scannan na hEireann/Irish Film Board.
Partnering on the project are Christos V. Konstantakopoulos of Faliro House in Greece, Carole Scotta of Haut et Court (who will be both the French co-producer and distributor of the film) and Derk-Jan Warrink, Joost de Vries and Leontine Petit of Lemming Films in Holland.

 

The Lobster is being financed by Film4, Bord Scannan na hEireann/Irish Film Board, the BFI Film Fund (the first film through its minority co-production strand), Eurimages, Greek Film Centre, CNC, the Dutch Film Fund and Canal+.

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From the Archive: Interview with Colin Farrell

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Paul Farren caught up with Colin Farrell and talked to him about Phone Booth and working with Joel Schumacher.

 

Tell us a little bit about Phone Booth.

 

It’s about a guy, a publicist who has just lost the run of himself, buying his own hype a little too much and this bird he wants to bang, but he’s married and he never calls the bird from his mobile phone because his wife checks the bill. So he calls her from the phone booth before three o’clock every day. One day he calls and she says again she’s busy, he puts the phone down and it starts to ring and he picks it up thinking she might be trying to three sixty nine him. He answers the phone and a dude on the other end says isn’t it funny the phone rings and it could be anybody but it still has to be answered. He claims to be a sniper in one of the nearby buildings and says he will kill me if I hang up the phone. The next hour and fifteen minutes is about me and him getting closer and closer, but still worrying if he’s going to pull the trigger.

 

It was a really quick shoot, wasn’t it?

 

It was shot in twelve days, which by normal standards sounds like looper shooting. It was a fairly low budget and we rehearsed for three weeks. Which you never get to do on film.

 

Rehearsing like that must have been a bit of a treat?

 

Ah yeah it was great, it was fuckin’ deadly. We sat around the table for a week and a half talking through the script, which was a great script. We knew we only had twelve days to shoot so when we finally got down to the street we wanted to know what was happening. There were fifteen actors, three assistant directors, Joel and me. We talked about it and changed little bits and then took it out onto the street. We had a phone booth, so we could rehearse around it, cars parked, people moving around. It was very obvious where I was going to be: I was in the fuckin’ phone booth (laughs).

 

Your American accent seems flawless. Does it take a lot of work?

 

Thanks, yeah I prepped with a voice coach. Usually I like to do three or four weeks before a job and start workin’ on it. A few hours every day just working on the script, and working on sounds. Then listening to tapes of Americans that represent where that particular character is from. Just practice, practice, practice.

 

Tell us about working with Joel Schumacher.

 

It was a blast. I loved working with Joel. I met him first when he was meeting a load of actors for Tigerland and I got a call “Do you want to go to London and meet Joel Schumacher?” and of course I’m going to do it. So I met Schumacher for three minutes and I left the office thinking, “That’s a fuckin’ waste of me time.” Then he called from America, I went over and had two weeks of general meetings and read for it again and got it. After that came Phone Booth. I can’t wait to see it, I can’t fuckin’ wait, to see if it works.

 

Have you achieved much fame in the States since Tigerland?

 

Nobody knows who the fuck I am!

 

How do you think you’ll handle the fame game when it does kick in?

 

I’ve no idea. It’s not something I’d know how to prepare for even if I gave a fuck about trying to prepare for it.

 

Are you living in the States much?

 

No, no not at all, I don’t have to go. This is how lucky I am. I’ve skipped so many rungs on the ladder that I don’t have to submerge myself in Hollywood and Hollywood society because I’ve had so many opportunities out of nowhere. I can go for a week and do a load of meetings then get the fuck out of there and come back here and there’s a great thing called Fedex as well. I get scripts sent from L.A. and I read them in Irishtown, so I’m lucky that way. All you’d end up doin’ is just going to parties and getting in trouble (laughs).

 

This article originally appeared in Film Ireland Magazine, Issue 105 in 2002

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Cinema Review: Dead Man Down

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DIR: Niels Arden Oplev • WRI: J.H. Wyman • PRO: David Hoberman, Ryan Kavanaugh, Todd Lieberman, Hugo Shong, Andy Yan • DOP: Paul Cameron • ED: Timothy A. Good, Frédéric Thoraval • DES: Niels Sejer • Cast: Colin Farrell, Noomi Rapace, Terrence Howard

Director Niels Arden Oplev’s American theatrical debut Dead Man Down is disappointingly devoid of all the edgy appeal of his acclaimed Swedish feature The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

Set in New York, Colin Farrell plays the brooding and broken Hungarian immigrant Victor, who infiltrates the gang who killed his family in order to exact his bloody revenge. However, Victor’s plan is interrupted when his neighbour Beatrice (Noomi Rapace) discovers his dark secret and contracts him into a scheme to seek out her own grisly vengeance against the drunk driver who ruined her life.

Dead Man Down is unevenly paced throughout, at times simmering with the slow-burning intensity of a Scandinavian thriller before being catapulted forward with spectacles of explosions and ‘shoot ’em ups’ more at home in an Arnold Schwarzenegger movie.

The film gets off to a lingering start with a heartfelt speech about the meaning of life from Farrell’s friend and fellow mob henchman, a heavily tattooed Dominic Cooper. Ominous close-ups of Farrell’s anguished face and Thespian eyebrows convey most of the dramatic intensity in the first 20 minutes and we settle in for what we expect to be a calculated, grim and gritty crime thriller.

Then all hell breaks loose with a great deal of gunfire, Albanian mobsters sporting AK-47s in broad daylight, much clichéd dialogue between clichéd villains and a flashy finale that involves the hero crashing through the front of a house to save his girl.

The plot is filled with twists and turns that occasionally defy logic and more than once Oplev and screenwriter J.H. Wyman (The Mexican, TV’s Fringe) breeze over weaknesses in the plot to move the film along.

Farrell has only been living in New York for a couple of years and yet has a flawless Yankee accent (for an Irish actor) with no trace of his Hungarian roots. This is briskly explained by Farrell in the film when asked by Rapace where his Hungarian accent went, ‘I worked hard to get rid of it.’ How convenient.

Rapace, well-versed in playing tormented souls, (her role as the damaged Lisbeth Saunders in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo was widely applauded), plays a woman so ‘disfigured’ by a car crash that the local scallywags throw stones at her and scrawl ‘Monster’ on her front door and yet, even with a few pink scars on her face, the Swedish actress is still more beautiful than most women on the planet.

Victor spends two years playing cat and mouse with the gang who murdered his wife and child, picking them off one by one and saving his full wrath for crime boss Alphonse Hoyt (Terrence Howard). Yet in all his painstakingly intricate and cautious planning, kills one gang member in his own apartment in full view of anyone who happens to be looking out of the window of the huge tower block of flats opposite. A supposedly fragile Beatrice films the whole thing on her phone before boldly securing a date with her known-murderer neighbour and insistently blackmailing him.

These inconsistencies (and they don’t end there) may have been easier to overlook if the film was brought to a clever and compelling ending, but the showy climax that resembles scenes from a Die Hard movie will disappoint an audience hoping for something better crafted.

Dead Man Down is a classic example of the actors outshining the film they were cast in. Farrell is a good enough actor to play this role in his sleep and yet the film doesn’t draw out his talents above and beyond the paint-by-numbers vested avenger character he was cast as. Rapace, whose interpretation of the complex Saunders in The Girl with... is also wasted in this role, and yet, it is the offbeat and tender romance between Victor and Beatrice, urged along by Beatrice’s quirky mother (Isabelle Huppert) that is the most watchable thing about the whole film.

Carmen Bryce

15A (see IFCO website for details)

117 mins
Dead Man Down is released on 3rd May 2013

Dead Man Down – Official Website

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Cinema Review: Seven Psychopaths

DIR/WRI: Martin McDonagh • PRO: Graham Broadbent, Peter Czernin, Martin McDonagh • DOP: Ben Davis • ED: Lisa Gunning • DES: David Wasco • CAST: Christopher Walken, Sam Rockwell, Woody Harrelson, Tom Waits, Colin Farrell

Psychopaths make great movies. Or at least, psychopathic characters make for great movies. Just one psychopath can make for memorable viewing, such as Hannibal Lecter or, in TV land, Dexter. Seven psychopaths? Director Martin McDonagh hasn’t made your standard cinema fare in the past and he’s not about to start now.

 

McDonagh’s follow-up to the superb In Bruges reunites the director with Colin Farrell. Farrell plays the lead, Martin, a Hollywood screenwriter suffering from writer’s block with only the title of his next script committed to paper. The title of his script? ‘Seven Psychopaths’. So let’s recap – Seven Psychopaths is a movie about a screenwriter, named Martin, writing a movie called ‘Seven Psychopaths’. You’d be correct in thinking this not your average cinema material.

 

Seven Psychopaths is recognisable as a McDonagh production through its moments of shocking violence amidst prolonged spells of colourful language. The movie brings to mind similarly mind-bending ventures, such as anything by Charlie Kaufmann. It also recalls Kiss, Kiss, Bang, Bang as it playfully toys with Hollywood clichés. The movie jumps between the reality of McDonagh’s script and the fantasy of Martin’s script, with one bleeding into the other. McDonagh passes little heed on the innocent audience as he splices the two Hollywood worlds together, stopping just short of having his characters talk directly to the camera in a movie about moviemaking.

 

Farrell is given fantastic support from an array of actors that suit the title very nicely including Sam Rockwell, Christopher Walken, Woody Harrelson and Tom Waits; men for whom psychosis doesn’t seem much of a stretch. The cast relish McDonagh’s dialogue in a script where anything goes, and regularly does go. Watching Walken and Harrelson share the screen is a sight to behold. Each man trying to out-psychopath the other until they are literally gobbling up scenery as quickly as their maniacally toothy grins will allow. Okay, maybe not literally, but not far off either.

 

With Seven Psychopaths, McDonagh has taken another bold step in cementing his status as a truly fearless and original filmmaker at a time when studios are increasingly fearful of risky business.  You’d be crazy to miss out on this slice of madness.

Peter White

Rated 16 (see IFCO website for details)
110 mins

Seven Psychopaths, is released on 7th December 2012

Seven Psychopaths– Official Website

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvuNfq5vN-w

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