‘The Wild Bunch’ at 50

In this podcast, Paul Farren & Wayne Byrne discuss Sam Peckinpah’s masterpiece The Wild Bunch, which celebrated its 50th anniversary this year. Paul and Wayne look back on the film’s legacy and celebrate its “ballet of violence”

plus:

  • how Peckinpah turned the Western genre on its head
  • the response to the film at that time
  • Peckinpah’s career & style
  • themes and symbols running through his films
  • the personal Peckinpah
  • different readings of the film
  • his collaborators
  • the death of the Western
  • the legacy The Wild Bunch leaves

 

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Film Ireland Podcast: Episode 38 – Crime is Cool Kids

Our podders return after a Film Ireland funded extended holiday to look back on the last couple of months in cinema. Dividing their time between tropical islands and cinemas in Dublin, Sarah Cullen and Richard Drumm take out their film scalpel and get under the skin of Extra Ordinary, Joker, Harriet, The Irishman, The Laundromat, La Belle Époque, Hustlers, Gemini Man and Ready or Not.

 

 

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Aoife Crehan, Writer/Director of ‘The Last Right’

The Last Right is a comedy-drama road movie telling the story of a man bringing the body of someone he barely knows for burial with his family. His good intentions are motivated by trying to patch up his relationship with his own brother. However, en route from West Cork to Rathlin Island, both romance and family secrets emerge to complicate the trip.

In this podcast Gemma Creagh talks to  writer/director Aoife Crehan about her debut feature and guides us through the development process.


The Last Right is released in cinemas 6th December 2019.

 

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Ruth Barton, Author of ‘Irish Cinema in the Twenty-First Century’

In this podcast, Natasha Waugh talks to Ruth Barton about her latest book Irish Cinema in the Twenty-First Century, a comprehensive overview of contemporary Irish cinema.

In this in-depth discussion, amongst other things, Natasha and Ruth discuss

  • what makes an Irish film
  • preoccupations within Irish cinema
  • a multiplicity of filmmakers making a multiplicity of films
  • TV
  • the success of the animation industry
  • gender representation
  • short film
  • Northern Irish cinema
  • the lack of diversity in the industry
  • what’s next for Irish cinema

 

 

Ruth Barton is Associate Professor in Film Studies at Trinity College Dublin. She has published widely on Irish cinema and her works include Irish National Cinema (2004) and Acting Irish in Hollywood (2006). She is a regular film critic on RTÉ radio’s Arena.

 Irish Cinema in the Twenty-First Century is available to buy now.

 

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Shelly Love, Director of ‘A Bump Along the Way’

 

In this podcast, Gemma Creagh chats to Shelly Love, the director of A Bump Along the Way which introduces us to Pamela, a boozy 44-year-old single mother whose teenage daughter Allegra disapproves of her care-free lifestyle. Their fragile relationship is further tested when Pamela becomes pregnant after a one-night stand.

Shelly discusses

  • her background in film
  • the choreography of directing
  • how A Bump Along the Way came together
  • prepping for the project
  • the production design on the film
  • working with Die Hexen on the soundtrack
  • working with 50 / 50 cast & crew + Abbey the dog
  • working on the edit with Helen Sheridan at Yellowmoon post-production facilities
  • how the film has been received

32″ 48′

 

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IndieCork Roundtable Podcast

Rachel Smyth & Kerrie Costello 

In this Film Ireland podcast, ahead of the this year’s IndieCork (6 – 13 October), Gemma Creagh sat down with 2 filmmakers whose films are screening at the festival. Rachel Smyth’s film Pit Stop tells the story of one woman’s attempt to flee an abusive relationship. Kerrie Costello’s film Nina introduces us to Sarah as she returns to a house to pack up.

 

Pit Stop (Rachel Smyth)

Screens Saturday, 12th Oct Irish Shorts 4 Programme
11.30 @ The Gate

Pit Stop tells the story of one woman’s attempt to flee an abusive relationship. In a moment of need she is helped by a stranger at a petrol station.

Nina (Kerrie Costello & Julien Celin)
Screens Sunday 13th Oct  Irish Shorts 6 Programme
11.30 @ The Gate

Nina follows Sarah as she returns to a house to pack up.  But the house reveals some dark memories, and they quickly begin to force their way into her mind…


Directors:

Rachel Smyth is a recent graduate of TU Dublin’s film and broadcasting. With a love of telling stories and everything visual she has been DOP on four short films since 2018 with Pit Stop being her directing debut.’
Kerrie Costello & Julien Celin are Dublin based writer-directors working together under the moniker Colo Pictures. They met in the post-production team of Brown Bag Films, and initially set out as writing partners, but that soon developed into directing together too. Their first film ‘Pins and Needles’ was an animated short for children, commissioned by RTE, and which aired on Christmas Eve 2018.  Live action is their main focus however, and Nina is their second film together and their first foray into live action. They are currently developing their second third short film.

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Tom Burke, Director of ‘Losing Alaska’

In this podcast, Paul Farren talks to Tom Burke, the director of Losing Alaska, which tells the story of a small community in Alaska called Newtok who are dealing with a slow-moving disaster. The 375 inhabitants of Newtok feel the winter storms grow more fierce each year and steal their coastline, they watch their homes disappear into rolling seas as the melting permafrost erodes the edges of their town. The plan is to abandon the town and start again 9 miles up the river on higher, more solid ground. The community is divided between those determined to stay, and those equally determined to move. They are fighting the weather, the indifference of state agencies and now, finally, each other.

As well as discussing the intricacies of the ways of life of the people of Newtok and the challenges they face, Tom talks about how the project came to be, telling a big story through the prism of a small situation, people trying to survive in a changing world, the nature of documentary, telling people’s stories, not taking sides, the joy of seagull eggs, screening the film in Newtok, the practicalities of filmmaking in such an environment, cameras and lenses, discovering a frozen-tripod-head panning technique, working with Gerry Horan on the soundtrack, creating a cinematic documentary and the onset of frostbite.

Losing Alaska is released in cinemas 4th October 2019.

Tom Burke will participate in a post-screening Q&A at the IFI on Thursday, 3rd October & the Light House cinema on Sunday, 6th October.

 

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