Preview of Irish Films @ Dublin International Film Festival 2020

 

The Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival (26 February – 8th March) returns for its 2020 edition, bringing with it 12 days of the best of  world cinema to Dublin alongside an exciting range of new Irish films. You can see the full programme here.

Below we preview the Irish films on offer.

 

Vivarium

DIR: Lorcan Finnegan • WRI: Garret Shanley, Lorcan Finnegan

 
A sci-fi suspense thriller, steeped in satire on suburbia and parenthood. A young couple looking for a starter home. Persuaded by a strange real estate agent, they decide to visit a brand-new development of homes on the outskirts of the city. The picture-perfect estate laid out under a sunny sky is attractive, but the couple gradually start to realise they are trapped in a scenario of nightmarish proportions. The estate appears to expand and all efforts to escape bring them back to the same house – then a baby boy appears.

CAST: Imogen Poots, Jesse Eisenberg

Filmmakers in attendance.

Tickets


Arracht

DIR: Tom Sullivan • WRI: Tom Sullivan, Tomás Ó Súilleabháin

Told in the Irish language, and set on the eve of The Great Hunger, Arract (meaning Monster) tells of a fisherman who takes in a stranger on the request of a priest. Events that follow lead to tragic personal struggles, but hope may come in the form of a young girl who needs his help.

CAST: Dónall Ó Healaí, Michael McElhatton,Saise Ní Chuinn

Filmmakers in attendance.

Tickets


Broken Law

DIR/WRI:  Paddy Slattery

28th Feb @ 20.45, Cineworld

A respected Garda finds his loyalties tested to the absolute limit in this crime thriller which tells the story of two estranged brothers on opposite sides of the law.

CAST: Ally Ni Chairain, Gary Lydon, Gemma-Leah Devereux, Graham Earley, John Connors, Ryan Lincoln, Tristan Heanue

Filmmakers in attendance. 

Tickets


Innocent Boy

DIR: John Connors • WRI: John Connors, Tiernan Williams

An all-Traveller cast stars in this drama about a young boy who uses the power of his imagination to cope with some tough realities in his life. Jack lost his mum at a young age, has a hearing impairment and is misunderstood and bullied at school. But joy and escape come in the fantasy world he has created with his best friend and beloved mare, Queenie. Innocent Boy was the winner of the 2019 Virgin Media Discovers Competition, chosen from over 600 submissions. Virgin Media Discovers is a short film competition to discover and support the very best filmmakers in Ireland.

Filmmakers in attendance.

Tickets


Rose Plays Julie

DIR/WRI: Christine Molloy, Joe Lawlor

A veterinary student who has a loving relationship with her adoptive parents but is determined to track down her birth mother – and now has a name and number. Initially rejected, she is undaunted, even if it means uncovering troubling truths.

CAST: Aiden Gillen, Ann Skelly, Orla Brady

Filmmakers in attendance.

Tickets


Screen Ireland Shorts #1

A selection of Screen Ireland shorts curated by Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival.

Tickets


New York Our Time

DIR: Vivienne Dick

Celebrated filmmaker and artist Vivienne Dick weaves a personal and philosophical documentary remembering 1970s New York in its heyday for bohemian artists and musicians. Featuring contributions from many of her contemporaries at that time, the film also contrasts the “No Wave” movement with contemporary culture amid present-day concerns.

Filmmakers in attendance.

Tickets


Skin+Soul

DIR: Ciara Nic Chormaic

Acclaimed photographer Perry Ogden returns to his fashion photography roots for his latest documentary. Told through the eyes – and the lens – of the photographer, the profound images that emerge onscreen have the effect of blurring the lines between the world of fashion and the real world.

Filmmakers in attendance.

Tickets


Violet Gibson

DIR: Barrie Dowdall • WRI: Barrie Dowdall, Siobhán Lynam

The extraordinary true story of the Irish woman who shot Mussolini is brought to life in Barrie Dowdall’s documentary. Violet Gibson, daughter of the Lord Chancellor to Ireland, shot the dictator at point-blank range as she faced a Fascist mob in Rome in 1926. The film looks at how she almost changed the course of history and the enormous personal price she paid.

CAST: Olwen Fouéré, Paraic Cullen, Susan Barrett, Laura Kelly

Filmmakers in attendance.

Tickets


Calm With Horses

DIR:  Nick Rowland • WRI: Joseph Murtagh.

Set in rural Ireland, it tells the story of exboxer Douglas ‘Arm’ Armstrong, who has become a feared enforcer for powerful local drug-dealing family the Devers. He’s also trying to be a good and supportive dad to his five-year-old son, Jack, who has autism. Already torn between criminal dealings and family obligations, Arm’s loyalties are truly tested when he is asked to kill for the first time.

Filmmakers in attendance.

Tickets


Anne Devlin

DIR/WRI: Pat Murphy

Pat Murphy’s groundbreaking, remastered drama about the woman commonly known as Robert Emmet’s housekeeper feels timely in the ongoing conversation about forgotten women in Irish history. Brid Brennan shines as Devlin, a woman of principles who refuses to be broken or betray her beliefs amid temptation, punishment and great suffering.

CAST: Bosco Hogan, Brid Brennen, Des McAleer

Pat Murphy in attendance

Tickets


Rialto

DIR:  Peter Mackie Burns • WRI: Mark O’Halloran

CAST: Tom Glynn-Carney, Tom Vaughan-Lawlor
 
Filmmakers in attendance.

Tickets


Windmill Lane

DIR: Alan Moloney

Director Alan Moloney’s film shows how a grimy warehouse in an inconsequential part of Dublin’s docklands became one of Ireland’s most important cultural cornerstones. Windmill Lane would become a mecca for music and the arts, with its output inspiring many at a time of remarkable cultural and social change in Ireland.

Filmmakers in attendance.

Tickets


Sea Fever

DIR/WRI: Neasa Hardiman

A young marine biology student is struggling with life among the closely-knit crew of a fishing trawler. But when many of them are struck down by a strange and lethal infection, they must work together if they are to survive.

CAT: Connie Nielsen, Dougray Scott, Hermione Corfield

Neasa Hardiman in attendance.

Tickets


Herself

DIR: Phyllida Lloyd • WRI: Clare Dunne, Malcolm Campbell

The story of Sandra who has parted ways with her possessive and domineering ex-partner. Sandra sets out to rebuild her life from scratch in order to provide a happy and peaceful home for her two young daughters.

But she finds herself struggling to fight back against a shattered housing system in the movie, which is set in and was filmed in Dublin. Undaunted, she sets about building her own place to call home, as she is determined to rebuild her and her family’s lives.

CAST: Clare Dunne, Ian Lloyd-Anderson, Conleth Hill, Harriet Walter.

Tickets

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Film Festivals 2020 – Here & Abroad

 

Keep an eye on film festivals here and Irish film festivals abroad.

This list will be updated throughout the year as festival dates are announced.

If there’s a festival you are involved with or know of that we haven’t listed, please do let us know at filmireland@gmail.com

Film Festivals in Ireland:

Dublin Smartphone Film Festival (25 January 2020)

Silk Road Film Festival Dublin ( 21 – 25 January 2020)

Psychoanalytic Film Festival (31 January – 1 February 2020)

Rathmullan Film Fest Donegal (20 – 23 February 2020)

Dublin International Film Festival (26 February– 8 March 2020)

Irish Adventure Film Festival  Westport, Co. Mayo (29th February  2020)

Cork French Film Festival (TBA)

First Cut! Youth Film Festival (11 – 14 March 2020)

The Catalyst Film Festival Limerick (20 – 21 March 2020)

Animation Dingle (20 – 21 March 2020)

Killarney Mountain Festival  (27 29 March 2020)

See You Next Thursday Festival  Dublin (TBA)

Dingle International Film Festival (TBA)

Fresh Film Festival Limerick (23  28 March 2020)

International Student Documentary Festival  Cork (TBA)

East Asia Film Festival Ireland Dublin (TBA)

Belfast Film Festival (1 – 9 April 2020)

Japanese Film Festival (TBA)

Cinemagic International Film and Television Festival Dublin (TBA)

Corona Fastnet Short Film Festival Cork (20 – 24 May 2020)

Korean Film Festival Ireland (TBA)

China Ireland International Film Festival (TBA)

Beara Film Fest (TBA)

Galway Film Fleadh (7 – 12 July 2020)

IFI Family Festival Dublin (TBA)

Radical Film Network Conference Dublin (TBA)

GAZE International LGBT Film Festival Dublin (30 July – 3 August)

Still Voices Short Film Festival Longford (13 – 16 August 2020)

Dublin Feminist Film Festival Dublin (TBA)

Charlie Chaplin Comedy Festival Kerry  (TBA)

Ireland Wildlife Film Festival Cork (TBA)

Underground Cinema Festival Dublin  (TBA)

Clare Island Film Festival (TBA)

Guth Gafa Meath (TBA)

IFI Documentary Festival  Dublin (TBA)

Disappear Here Film Festival Donegal (TBA)

Spook Scene Cork  (TBA)

Cinemagic International Film and Television Festival Belfast TBA)

Dublin International Short Film and Music Festival (TBA)

Dublin Arabic Film Festival (TBA)

Kilkenny Animated (TBA)

IndieCork (4 – 11 October 2020)

OFFline Offaly (TBA)

Dublin Greek Film Festival  (TBA)

Dublin Animation Film Festival (October TBC)

Kerry Film Festival (15 – 18 October 2020)

The Clones Film Festival (TBA)

Richard Harris International Film Festival Limerick (TBA)

IFI Horrorthon Dublin (TBA)

Light Moves Festival (TBA)

Dublin Independent Film Festival (TBA)

Cork Film Festival (12 – 22 November 2020)

Carlow International Film Festival (14 – 17 November 2020)

Iffy Short Film Festival Dublin (November 2020 TBC)

Waterford Film Festival (TBA)

Subtitle European Film Festival (23 – 29 Nov 2020)

Luminous Void Experimental Film Festival Cork (TBA)

Junior Galway Film Fleadh (10 – 14 November 2020)

Foyle Film Festival Derry (TBA)

IFI French Film Festival Dublin (TBA)

KINOPOLIS Polish Film Festival Dublin (TBA)


Irish Film Festivals Abroad:

Irish Film Festival New Jersey (1st February 2020)

Capital Irish Film Festival Washington (27th February – 1st March 2020)

Chicago Irish Film Festival (27th February – 1st March 2020)

Toronto Irish Film Festival (28th February – 1st March 2020)

Irish Film Festival Boston (22 – 24 March 2020)

Irish Film Festa Rome (March 2020)

Irish Film Festival Ottawa (3 – 5 April 2020)

Irish Film Festival Sydney (13 – 17 May), Melbourne (21 – 24 May 2020)

Irish Reels Film Festival Seattle (TBA)

Celtic Media Festival  Quimper  (2 – 4 June 2020)

Baton Rouge Irish Film Festival (TBA)

British & Irish Film Festival (TBA)

Syracuse Contemporary Irish Film Festival (TBA)

Festival of Irish Cinema Warsaw (TBA)

San Francisco Irish Film Festival(TBA)

The Irish American Movie Hooley   (TBA)

Irish Reels Film Festival Seattle (TBA)

Irish Screen America Los Angeles(TBA)

Irish Screen America New York  (TBA)

Irish Film Festival London(TBA)

Vancouver Irish Film Festival (TBA)

This list will be updated throughout the year as festival dates are announced.

If there’s a festival you are involved with or know of that we haven’t listed, please do let us know at filmireland@gmail.com

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One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest – 45th Anniversary Screening @ First Fortnite

This year is the 45th anniversary of the release of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest.  Writer and broadcaster Ann Marie Hourihan tells us why the film is still relevant today.  The film screens in Donegal, Leitrim and Kildare as part of First Fortnight Festival, which makes the beginning of each year synonymous with mental health awareness, challenging prejudice and ending stigma.

One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest still feels fresh.  The film was released in 1975, it  was based on the novel written by Ken Kesey, published in 1962. But  its theme is eternal. One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest is about control, that is social control. And it is also about the insanity of sanity.

When it first appeared the book – which also became a successful Broadway play-  was recognised  as a portrait of the individual against the system, of the fight between the old culture of conformity against the new alternative counter culture of which Ken Kesey was a enthusiastic member. He had also worked nights at the Palo Alto Veterans’ Hospital.

The film  is about mental illness as a form of protest against the madness of the world, and as a shelter from the world, and also as a punishment meted out by the world.   One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest is set in  a mental hospital that functions because both sides – the staff and the patients – agree on this view and conform to it: “Medication time!”

Into this calm and desolate system comes R.P McMurphy who wants  to be incarcerated in a mental hospital rather than face time in jail. He has been convicted of statutory rape for having sex with a fifteen year old girl. McMurphy is unrepentant : “She was fifteen going on thirty five and she was very willing… no man could resist that.”

In fact throughout the film sex  (for men) is regarded as the cure for most things. Several of the patients have been  incarcerated precisely because the outside world does not allow them to have sex. Both Billy’s mother and Mr Hardy’s wife have forbidden their men sex and therefore, by implication, consigned them to the madhouse . On their hospital ward  they are dominated and patronised by Nurse Ratched, whom McMurphy quickly identifies as the enemy.

There are no female patients in this  hospital and there is only one non-white male on McMurphy’s ward : Chief, a Native American, played by Will Sampson. The male orderlies are all African-Americans. So  McMurphy has a group of white men to play with, and to bring pleasure to.  He cleans up at their card games, takes them fishing, tries to sharpen up their basket ball, and petitions for them to watch the World Series: “Come on, be good Americans”.

One of the greatest scenes in the film is when, although Nurse Ratched has forbidden patients to watch the World Series, R.P. McMurphy sits them down in front of a blank television screen and has them cheering at an imaginary baseball game whilst he provides a running commentary.

Most of the time though his fellow inmates are shy, obedient and terribly afraid. They don’t want any trouble and, as McMurphy discovers to his horror, the majority of them are voluntary inmates, free to leave whenever they want but reluctant to even try for liberty.

The film is brought to greatness by the actors portraying these patients. The stuttering Billy ( Brad Dourif), Danny DeVito as Martini, who eats the Monopoly pieces, and Cheswick, played by Sydney Lassick. Cheswick is full of despair as he protests at Nurse Ratched’s withholding of his cigarettes by sobbing “ I ain’t no little kid.”

The punishment for Cheswick’s outburst is swift and terrible, and we see clearly what McMurphy is only beginning to understand: that the relative calm of Nurse Ratched’s ward is based on a ruthless penal system just as bad as any prison’s.

In the book the story of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest is narrated by the Chief – its title comes from a nursery rhyme from his childhood. At the end of the film McMurphy’s anarchy gives the Chief courage to start living again, although the system at the hospital remains  unchanged.

The director of  the film, Milos Foreman, had escaped to America from the Soviet totalitarianism in his native Czechoslavakia. He was determined that the film, before anything else, had to feel real. He and many of the film’s actors stayed at the Oregon State Mental Hospital where it was filmed. In fact Dr Spivey, who interviews McMurphy on his arrival, was played by Dr Dean Brooks, who was the director of the hospital. Other parts in the film were taken by real patients and staff. Even at the time of filming the mental health system’s attitude to incarceration was changing:   the population of Oregon State Mental Hospital had been fallen to just 600 patients. Some of the  film’s attitudes would not be tolerated now. But some things do not change and anyone with experience of the modern mental health system will identify with it. One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest still feels all too real.

 

One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest screens

04 January @ 20:00 Amharclann Ghaoth Dobhair, Donegal
14 January @ 20:00 The Dock, Leitrim
16 January @ 20:00 The Riverbank , Kildare

 

First Fortnight utilises arts and culture to challenge mental health stigma while supporting some of Ireland’s most vulnerable people through creative therapies. 

In Ireland, one in four people are predicted to struggle with their mental health at some point in their lives.

 

www.firstfortnight.ie/

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Catalyst International Film Festival – 2020

The inaugural Catalyst International Film Festival will open in Limerick in March 2020 presenting a film programme that prioritises stories and storytellers currently under-represented on screen and behind the camera. Led by Dr. Susan Liddy and Vanessa Gildea, the festival will endeavour to create a more inclusive industry and films screened at Catalyst will promote gender equality, diversity and inclusion whether in content, key creative roles or crew.

There will be panel discussions, workshops and Q&As where topical issues of the day will be enthusiastically debated with filmmakers, guest speakers, industry personnel and audience members. Catalyst International Film Festival believes that equality is key to enriching filmmaking and audiences and it is core to this festival.

The festival is now accepting submissions via Film Freeway:

https://filmfreeway.com/CatalystInternationalFilmFestival 

More screenings and events to be announced.

 

The Catalyst Film Festival runs from 20-21st March in Limerick.

https://catalystfilmfest.com 

 

 

Submissions & Funding Deadlines

Film Festivals 2020 – Here & Abroad

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Submissions & Funding Deadlines

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Looking for funding for your film? Want to submit your work to festivals? Keep an eye on upcoming deadlines here.

If you have a deadline you’d like us to include, please contact filmireland@gmail.com

 

Click on the link for further information:

 

Submissions: GAZE 3rd April 2020

Submissions:  Galway Film Fleadh  13th March 2020

Submissions: Irish Film Festival Australia12th March 2020

Funding: Focus Shorts 6th March 2020

Funding: Arts and Disability Connect 24th February 2020

Funding: Frameworks Animated Short Film Scheme – 7th February 2020

Submissions: Catalyst Film Festival 7th February 2020

Film bursary award supports professional individual artists at any stage of their career working in the field of experimental or non-narrative film making to develop their arts practice – 30th January 2020

Funding: ilDÁNAsupporting the making of an ambitious and cinematic long-form documentary on the arts in Irish – 31st January 2020

Series Mania delegation of Irish Producers  Fís Éireann/Screen Ireland is currently issuing a call out to bring a delegation Screen Ireland will provide support to a limited number of Irish production companies to participate at this networking event. Screen Ireland will ALSO cover the cost of accreditation to the festival Series Mania, limited to one producer applicant per company – 24th January 2020

Submissions First Cut! Youth Film Festival – 21st January 2020

Festival Submission: WFT Short Film Showcase 2020 – 20th January 2020

SDGI ARRI Alexa Take 2020 supports the production of experiential and conceptual visual films that spark discovery and inspiration for directors – 17th January 2020

Festival Submission: Irish Film Festa – 12th January 2020

Funding: Físín – Short Film Proposal in the Irish Language – 10th January 2020

Funding: Touring and dissemination of work scheme to support the touring and dissemination of work in certain arts disciplines for tours starting between July 2020 and December 2020 – 9th January 2020

Artists in Residence @ Centre Culturel Irlandais – 8th January 2020

Romilly Walton Masters Performance Awardsupports a one or two-night performance in Centre Culturel Irlandais by an emerging performer or group working in the areas of experimental theatre, music, dance, film or visual art – 8th January 2020

Funding:  Fís Pitching Award 2020 6th January 2020

Cartoon Movie 2020 Registration – 20th December 2019

Screen Ireland Production Funding:  TV Drama Production – 13th December 2019

Project Development Loans13th December 2019

Documentary Development 13th December 2019

Screenplay Development 13th December 2019

Fiction: Irish Production  – 13th December 2019

IDFA Bertha FUND – 10th December 2019

Support for Development of Audiovisual Content – Single Projects  – 13th November 2019

Festival Submissions: Irish Film Festival, Boston – 31st October 2019

TV Drama Development  – 31st October 2019

Project Development Loans – 31st October 2019

Documentary Development 31st October 2019

Screenplay Development31st October 2019

Eurimages Co-production Deadlines – 22nd October 2019

TV Drama Production Funding – 18th October 2019

Fiction: Irish Production18th October 2019

NFF+HBF Co-production scheme – 9th October 2019

Festival Submissions: Iffy Short Film Festival – 4th October 2019

Script + Project Development: Voices – 1st September 2019

EAVE Producers Workshop 2020 – 30th August 2019

Project Development Loans30th August 2019

Documentary Development 30th August 2019

Screenplay Development30th August 2019

Eurimages Co-production Deadlines 22nd August 2019

TV Drama Production Funding 16th August 2019

Fiction: Irish Production  16th August 2019

Authored Works Funding Scheme 15th August 2019

Script + Project Development: Bright Future 1st August 2019

Festival Submissions: Virgin Media Discovers Short Film Competition 26th July

Submissions for TG4 Programming 2020-2021 12th July 2019

Submissions for Medimed, the Euromed Docs Market & Pitching Forum 30th June 2019

NEXTWAVE 30th June 2019

TV Drama Development  28th June 2019 

Project Development Loans 28th June 2019 

Documentary Development  28th June 2019

Screenplay Development  28th June 2019

TV Drama Production Funding 14th June 2019

Fiction: Irish Production 14th June 2019

Festival Submissions: Dublin Feminist Film Festival Submissions  14th June 2019

TFL World Co-Production Fund 12th June 2019

ACE 29 Production Training Programme 12th June 2019

IBF Project Development  10th June 2019

IBF Production & Post Production  10th June  

Selective Distribution 7th June 2019

Cinema Distribution Selective Scheme  4th June 2019

TFL Audience Design Fund 3rd June

Festival Submissions: Galway Film Fleadh Pitching Competition 31st May 2019

Television Programming 28th May 2019

48 Hour Challenge 24th May 2019

NI Screen Craft and Technical Skills Scheme 10th May 2019

Reel Art Funding Scheme 9th May 2019

Support To Film Festivals  7th May 2019

Kerry Short Film Bursary 30th April

WRAP Development Support 30th April 2019

Project Development Loans 30th April 2019

Documentary Development  30th April 2019

Screenplay Development   30th April 2019

Creative Europe MEDIA Single Project Development 24th April 2019

Screen Leaders 19th April 2019

TV Drama Production Funding 16th April 2019

Fiction: Irish Production 16th April 2019

Irish Delegation to BANFF World Media Festival and Vancouver Trade Mission 12th April 2019

Promotion of European Works Online 5th April 2019

True North Shorts  3rd April 2019

IDFA Bertha Fund 1st April 2019

Festival Submissions: Shot by the Sea Submissions 31st March 2019

Young Irish Film Makers Screenwriting competition 31st March 2019

FilmOffaly Short Film Award  22nd March 2019

Festival Submissions: Newport Beach Film Festival Submissions 21st March 2019

Harp Media Student Short Film and Screenplay Competition 15th March 2019

Northern Ireland Screen’s Feature Documentary Development Funding 15th March 2019

Arts Grant Funding 14th March 2019

EFP Producers on the Move 2019 12 March 2019

 

Festival Submissions: Doc Fest Ireland Film Submissions 9th March 2019

Film Education 7th March 2019

Project Development Loans 28th February 2019 

TV Drama Development  28th February 2019

TV Drama Production Funding 28th February 2019

Documentary Development  28th February 2019

Screenplay Development  28th February 2019

Pitch Pilot Workshop Galway 22nd February 2019

Slate Funding Development  20th February 2019

Festival Submissions: WFT Members’ Short Film Showcase Submissions 20th February 2019

Festival Submissions: St. Patrick’s Film Festival London Short Film Submission – 15th February 2019

Fiction: Irish Production 15th February 2019

Access to Markets  7th February 2019

Beara Film Fest    31st January 2019

Arts Council Film bursary award  31st January 2019

Festival Submissions: First Cut! Youth Film Festival 14th January

Submissions for Writers Conference 11th January

SDGI Arri Alexa Take 11th January 2019

Festival Submissions: Galway Film Fleadh Feature Film Submissions 18th January 2019

Festival Submissions: Irish Film Festa Short Film Submissions 10th January 2019

Artist Residencies and Bursaries  @ Centre Culturel Irlandais 10th January 2019

Cinema Distribution Selective Scheme  8th January 

Festival Submissions: Newport Beach Film Festival 21st December 2018

Junior Entertainment Talent Slate 20th December 2018

Support To Film Festivals  20th December 2018 

Television Programming 18th December 2018 

Creative Europe MEDIA Single Project Development 18th December 2018

Festival Submissions: Irish Animation Awards Submissions 10th December 2018

Festival Submissions: Dingle International Film Festival  Submissions – 3rd December 2018

Festival Submissions: Dublin Smartphone Film Festival Submissions – 1st December 2018

Cartoon Movie 21st November 2018

BAI Sound & Vision Round 3 TV & Radio – 8th November 2018

BAI Sponsorship Scheme 2019 29th November

Festival Submissions: Celtic Media Festival Submissions – 31st October 2018

Festival Submissions: Dingle International Film Festival  Físín Submissions  – 26th October

Festivals Investment Scheme – 25th October 2018

Celtic International Fund – 24th October 2018

Reel Art and Authored Works  –11 October 2018

BAI Archiving Funding Scheme  –4th October 2018

Festival Submissions: Shebeen Flick Submissions – 1st October 2018

International Co-Production Development Fund – 30th September 2018

BAI Canada-Ireland Co-development Incentive  – 28th September 2018

IMRO | RTÉ Scoring For Film Programme 28th September 2018

EWA Network Scriptwriter’s Residency 24th September

RTÉ | BAI Round 32  21st September 2018

Festival Submissions: Irish Screen America New York  Submissions Extended Deadline 14th September 2018

Festival Submissions: Irish Film Festival London Submissions 14th September 2018

Dublin Port Short Film Prize 13th September 2018

Annual Directors’ Finders Series Showcase 7th September 2018

Cinemagic Young Filmmaker 31st August 2018

Festival Submissions: Waterford Film Festival Late Deadline 31st August

Festival Submissions: Richard Harris International Film Festival Submissions Late Deadline 18th August 2018

Screen Ireland Film Project Award – 16th July 2018

Wexford Stories Short Film Funding 31st July 2018

Festival Submissions: ADIFF  Submissions 31st July 2018

Festival Submissions: Richard Harris International Film Festival Submissions 31st July 2018

Wicklow Screendance Laboratory 27th July 2018

Festival Submissions: Waterford Film Festival Short Films & Short Scripts 27th July 2018

Writing Mentorship Scheme 23rd July 2018

Film Mayo Creative Ireland Residency Award 18th July 2018

Festival Submissions: Underground Cinema Film Festival Submissions 14th July  2018

Festival Submissions: Spook Screen Submissions 30th June 2018

ilDÁNA Documentary Funding 21st June

IFI Documentary Festival Submissions 20th June 2018

Pitching Competition Galway Film Fleadh 8th June 2018

Galway Film Fair Marketplace 1st June 2018

Irish Film Board Production Funding 31st May 2018 

TV Programming Support Scheme 24th May 2018

Festival Submissions: Galway Film Fleadh Short Film Submissions 12th May 2018

Festival Submissions: Cork Film Festival  Feature Film Submissions 4th May 2018

Film Bursary Award 2018 27th April 2018

dlr First Frames Scheme Short Film Funding 27th April 2018

Arts and Disability Connect Funding Scheme 26th April 2018

Festival Submissions: Light Moves Festival of Screendance Submissions 20th April 2018

Support for Development of Audiovisual Content – Single Project 2018 19th April 2018

Screen Training Ireland Screen Leaders 13th April 2018

POV Training Scheme for female writers & directors  13th April 2018

Northern Ireland Screen’s Feature Doc Development 6th April 2018

Film In Cork 2018 Short Film Award Submissions 6th April 2018

Festival Submissions: OFFline Film Festival Animation Residency 30th March 2018

Artist in the community scheme Arts Council Funding 26th March

Film Offaly & Filmbase 2018 Short Film Award  23rd March 2018

EFP Producers on the Move 22nd March 2018

SHORT STORIES IFB Funding 23rd March 2018

Student Media Production Awards Funding 20th March 2018

Youth Music Video Competition 28th February 2018

IFB New Writing Development 28th February 2018

First Cut! Youth Film Festival Short Film Submissions 28th February 2018

IFTA Film & Drama Awards 15th February 2018

Arts Council Film Project Award  15th February 2018

Galway Film Centre & RTÉ Short Film Commission Scheme 14th February 2018

Hope: 1998 All Ireland Referendum Funding 9th February 2018

Creative Europe Slate Funding – Support for Development of Audiovisual Content 6th February 2018

Frameworks Scheme – 2nd February 2018

Irish Film Board Screenplay Development 31st January 2018

 Irelands Young Filmmaker of the Year 2018  26th January

Arts Council Film Bursary Award  25th January 2018

Bursary Information Day for Documentary Filmmakers 18th January 2018

Irish Film Festa Submissions 10th January 2018

BAI Sponsorship Scheme 4th January 2018 

Storyland Submissions 15th December 2017

Junior Entertainment Talent Slate 14th December 2017

IMRO Music for Screen Seminar 6th Dec 2017 

Dublin Smartphone Film Festival 1st December 2017

Sound and Vision 1st December 2017

BAI Sound & Vision Scheme Round 30 1st December 2017

Irish Film Festival, Boston 30th November, 2017

RTÉ ECommissioning – Irish Scripted Comedy 29th November 2017

Support for Development of Audiovisual Content – Single Project 2018 23th November 2017 

ilDÁNA 20th October 2017

IFTA Awards 2018 Submissions Deadline for Film & Drama 17th November 2017

TV Programming Support Scheme 16th November 2017

Reel Art 13th October 2017

Cine4 Development Scheme 6th October

Shebeen Flick 1st October 

Audi Dublin International Film Festival 1st October 2017

Irish Filmmaker Competition 27th August 2017

Foyle Film Festival 29th September 2017

TV3 Spring 2018 31st July 2017

Cork Film Festival  15th July 2017

Kerry Film Festival  14th July 2017

The One Minute Film Festival 30th June 2017

Light Moves Symposium 30th June 2017

Cine4 Development Scheme 22nd June 2017

Wexford Documentary Film Festival 19th June 2017

Galway Film Fleadh Pitching Competition 7th June 2017

Close Up – Filmbase Talent Development Scheme 5th June 2017

Jameson First Shot 1st June 2017

Film 48 Hour Challenge 31st May 2017

TV Programming Scheme 30th May 2017

Guth Gafa International Documentary Film Festival 29th May 2017

GAZE International LGBT Film Festival 12th  May 2017

Still Voices Short Film Festival 14th May 2017

Arts and Disability Connect 4th May 2017

TV3 Single Documentary Call Out 2017 31st April 2017

TV3 Autumn 2017 30th April 2017

dlr First Frames Scheme 28th April 2017

Support for Film Festivals 27th April 2017

Support for Content Development of a Single Project  20th April 2017

Science on Screen 19th April 2017

Galway Film Fleadh 31st March 2017

TV3 Studio Call Out 2017 22nd March 2017

The Short Film Festival of Ireland 17th March 2017

Sci-Fi Film Festival 15th March 2017

ilDÁNA 10th March 2017

Frameworks Short Film Scheme 10th March 2017

Support for Film Education 2nd March 2017

Arts Council Film Project Award 2nd March 2017

First Cut! Youth Film Festival  28th February 

Young Animator Of The Year Awards 28th February 2017

RTÉ Factual 20th February 20 17

SHORT SHOTS Filmbase/RTÉ Short Film Scheme 16th February 2017

Fastnet Film Festival 14th February 2017

Support for Development – Slate Funding  2nd February 2017

Short Film Commission Scheme 31st January 2017

Close Up – Development Scheme for Actors 26th January 2017

RTÉ Young Peoples Animated Shorts Scheme 18th January 2017

Factual Entertainment Series for RTÉ2 16th January 2017

Eurimages Co-production  12th January 2017

RTÉ  Comedy, Talent Development and Music proposals 5th January 2017

Irish Film Festa (short films) 20th December 2016

Film In Cork – Short Script Award 9th December 2016

Distribution – Selective Scheme  1st December 2016

Chicago Irish Film Festival 1st December 2016

Irish Film Board Development  30th November 2016

Irish Film Board Distribution 30th November 2016

Support for Film Festivals 24th November 2016 

TV Programming Scheme 24th November 2016 

Irish Film Festival London 23 – 27 November 2016

Support for Content Development of a Single Project – 17th November 2016

Irish Film Board Development 31st October 2016

Irish Film Board  Production & Distribution 28th October 2016

Audi Dublin International Film Festival  1st October 2016

IFB Production and Distribution Funding  30th September 2016

Canada-Ireland Co-development Incentive 28th September 2016

Northern Ireland Screen Short Film Funding 23rd September 2016

Radharc Awards 2016 23rd September 2016

Clones Film Festival Short Film Submissions 31st August 2016

Submissions for 10th Waterford Film Festival 26th August 2016

IFTA Gala Television Awards 22nd August 2016

IFB Focus Shorts  5th August 2016

IFB Real Shorts  5th August 2016

Underground Cinema Film Festival 31st July 2016

Cinemagic Belfast 25th July, 2016

Waterford Film Festival 15th July 2016

IFB Short Stories 15th July 2016

Kerry Film Festival 11th July 2016

Audi Dublin International Film Festival 11th July 2016

Galway Film Fleadh Pitching Competition 9th July 2016

Cork Film Festival 2nd July 2016

Fingal Film Festival 30th June 2016

IFI Documentary Festival 20th  June 2016

Galway Film Fleadh  The One Minute Film Festival June 23rd 2016 

IFB Production and Distribution Funding 17th June 2016

Distribution Selective Scheme 14th June 2016

Kerry Film Festival Short Film Submission 11th July 2016

Film on the Edge 10th June 2016

Galway Film Fleadh Pitching Competition 9th June 2016

Galway Film Fleadh 2016 Marketplace Applications 27th May 2016 

Light Moves 27th May 2016

Television Programming   26th May 2016  

Guth Gafa International Documentary Film Festival 15th May

Directors’ Finders Series Showcase 29th April 2016

Support for Film Festivals   28th April 2016

Single Project Development  21st April 2016

Eurimages Co-Production 15th April, 2016

Pitching Forum for Co-Production Projects April 15th 2016

March on Film 31st March, 2016

Feel Good Lost Filmmakers Competition  29th February 2016

Galway Film Fleadh  Feature Films 25th March 2016

Northern Ireland Screen’s Irish Language Broadcast Fund 18th March 2016

Frameworks 11th March 2016

Limerick Film Festival  4th March 2016

FilmOffaly Award 4th March 2016

Co-Production Funds 25 February 2016

IFB Production and Distribution Funding 19th February 2016

Jameson Gone in 60 Seconds 14th February 2016

Fastnet Film Festival 14th February 2016

March On Film 14th February 2016

First Cut! Youth Film Festival 12th February

Slate Funding 4th February 2016

Live Life National Film Competition 1st February

ASSET programme 30th January 2016

Short Shots @ Filmbase 28th January 2016

Access to Markets   28th January 2016

National Youth Media Awards 22nd January 2016

Fresh Film Festival 22nd January 2016

Arts Council Bursary Awards 21st January 2016

Young Directors Awards 2016 15th January 2016

Artists in Residence @ Centre Culturel Irlandais 11th January 2016

Jameson First Shot Film Competition 4th January 

Irish Film Festa (short film) 20th December

Belfast Film Festival Short Film Competition 18th December

Animation Dingle  December 4th 2015

Dingle International Film Festival 11th December 2015

Dublin Doc Fest 11th December 2015

EU Commission TV Programming Funding 3rd December, 2015 / May 26, 2016

Chicago Irish Film Festival 1st December 2015

Clermont-Ferrand International Short Film Festival 20th November 2015

EU Commission Single Project Development Funding 19th November 2015 / 21st April 2016

Splanc! Irish language Arts Documentary Scheme 16th November 2015

Boston Irish Film Festival 15th November 2015

Feature Documentary Development 6th November 2015

Animation Dingle Early Deadline 6th November 2015

Dublin International Film Festival Short Film Submissions  31st October 2015

Junior Galway Film Fleadh Story Pitching Competition 30th October 2015

Celtic Media Festival  30th October 2015

Short Film Proposal in the Irish Language 19th October 2015

Reel Art  16th October 2015

OFFline Filmmaking Challenge 8 – 10 October 2015

Clones 48 Hour Short Film Challenge 5th October 2015

Ronan Phelan Euroconnection Pitching Award 2015 4 – 11 October 2015

Cinemagic Young Filmmaker Competition 30th September

Capital Irish Film Festival  30th September

Irish Film Festival London  28th September

Feminist Film Festival Short Film Submissions  25th September

Foyle Film Festival 25th September

BBC Writersroom Script Room 24th September

Pitch 25-minute doc for TG4 18th September

Richard Harris International Film Festival  4th September

Clones Film Festival  30th August

Guth Gafa ‘Next Generation’ Short Documentary Student Competition  28th August

Creative Proposals for RTE 26th August

Documentaries for Guth Gafa International Documentary Film Festival 22nd August

Indie Cork 1st August

Irish Screen America  1st August

GAZE International LGBT Film Festival  30th July

Sky Road TV & Film Festival 17th July  [Early Bird]

The One Minute Film Festival  30th June

Fingal Film Festival  30th June

Underground Cinema Film Festival  30th June

IFI Documentary Festival  24th  June

Shortfilm48 12 – 14 June

Light Moves  10th June

Charlie Chaplin Film Festival  1st June

Arts and Disability Connect  21st May

Lady’s First International Film Festival 20th May

Short Films for Galway Film Fleadh 2015  15th May

Frameworks  15th April

FilmOffaly/Filmbase 2015 Short Film Award  20th March

Secrets of Offaly – Public Art Commission  13th February

 AFTER ’16  6th February

Jameson First Shot 2015 1st February

Dublin Doc Fest Short Documentary Film  30th January

Irish Animation Awards  23rd January

Youth Film Festival  9th January

 

 

 

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Review of Irish Film @ Cork Film Festival 2019: The Other Lamb

 

Ciara Creedon reviews  an Irish-Belgian co-production adaptation of fantasy author Catherine S McMullen’s  haunting, visionary drama.

The Other Lamb is an Irish-Belgian co-production, written by Catherine S. McMullen and helmed by Polish director Małgorzata Szumowska. Selected for the Closing Night Gala of the 64th Cork Film Festival, it stars Raffey Cassidy as Selah, a teenage girl who has grown-up in a repressive, all-female cult referred to as the Flock. The cult members follow a man known as the Shepherd, their Charles Manson-esque messiah played by Michiel Huisman. As Selah reaches the cusp of womanhood, she begins to question her faith and her future role in the Flock. 

The cult resides in a remote countryside location, and the depiction of the women’s everyday lives clearly takes inspiration from the world of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale. The Shepherd’s Wives all dress in red while the Daughters dress in royal blue. They are completely subservient to the Shepherd, all vying to be granted his “grace”, with the Wives’ bodies completely at his disposal. The Shepherd warns his followers about the rot of the outside world, full of “broken things” that they must stay away from. At the beginning of the film Selah is his most devoted daughter, one of his favourites due to her beauty as well as the fact that she has yet to get her period, which the Shepherd is disgusted by and describes as punishment for “Eve’s sin”. However, Selah becomes increasingly disillusioned with the Shepherd’s dogmatic regime, spurred on in part by the relationship she forms with the Shepherd’s former favourite and cult-outcast, Sarah (played skilfully by Denise Gough). Sarah reveals that the Shepherd was partly responsible for Selah’s mother’s death, and that he is not all-knowing and all-powerful but a cruel, fickle false prophet. Selah begins to have disturbing, grotesque visions as her doubts grow. When the police pay a visit to the Flock’s settlement, the Shepherd informs his followers that they must find a new home, and the journey proves to test the women’s belief like never before.

The most remarkable aspect of The Other Lamb is its cinematography. The film is visually stunning, shot entirely in Wicklow. The shots of the landscape are breath-taking, featuring sequences at Powerscourt Waterfall as well as Lough Tay, which the Shepherd describes as “paradise on earth”. The royal blue and crimson costumes worn by the cult members are striking against the de-saturated grey-green of the Irish countryside. The performances are strong all-round too. Raffey Cassidy does a stellar job as a teenage girl questioning the world around her and gaining confidence in her own strength – a lot of the shots rely on Cassidy’s ability to convey myriad emotions through facial expression alone. Michiel Huisman does a fine job too as smarmy cult leader, intent on taking advantage of vulnerable women. The film’s score, composed by Paweł Mykietyn, is minimalist but powerful and fitting. The film features many haunting acapella performances of folk songs by the cult members such as “Babes in the Wood” and “Down to the Valley to Pray”, as well as one pop song that fits surprisingly well – ‘The Last Goodbye’ by indie rock band The Kills.

The film has its flaws, particularly its slow and somewhat uneven pace. The symbolism can be quite heavy-handed too. The Flock own a literal flock of sheep from which they take literal sacrificial lambs. In one scene it is made clear that the Shepherd doesn’t want any male members in the Flock, and Sarah emphasises to Selah that there is only room for “one ram”. Driving this point home to the audience, the Flock own one actual ram whom Selah has frequent stares-off with, reflecting her growing distrust of the Shepherd. These points aside however, the film is an enjoyable and thought-provoking watch. Selah’s transformation from devout follower of a patriarch to a leader in her own right is explored very well, as well as the power of embracing female rage rather than shying away from it. The importance of having control over your own narrative is emphasised too; the Shepherd makes it clear that he is the only one allowed to tell stories, but Selah defies this and tells a story of her own. The final shot of the film will stay with you for a long time after viewing. The film is worth seeing for how beautiful the shots are alone, but it also explores Selah’s coming-of-age and the dismantling of a patriarchal community in a captivating way.

 

The Other Lamb screened on Sun, 17th Nov 2019 @ the 2019 Cork Film Festival (7 – 17 November).

   

 

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Review of Irish Film @ Cork Film Festival 2019: Screen Ireland World Premiere Shorts

 

Loretta Goff was at the Cork Film Festival’s screening of short films produced under Fís Éireann/Screen Ireland’s Focus Shorts and Real Shorts schemes.

Ten short films produced under Fís Éireann/Screen Ireland’s Focus Shorts and Real Shorts schemes had their world premiere at the 64th Cork Film Festival on the 16th of November. Mags O’Sullivan of Screen Ireland introduced the programme of shorts by noting that 60% of them were directed by women and that 50% had female screenwriters, highlighting Screen Ireland’s commitment to diversity and gender equality, which was evident across these shorts. The films ranged in their mode of expression and style—encompassing animation, documentary and live-action—but all engaged with types of community and identity, making for interesting comparisons and showing off Irish talent.

Lorraine Lordan’s A Cat Called Jam opened the programme with the humorous tale of a cat who sees himself as a dog and just wants to be part of the pack. Despite reactions suggesting he doesn’t quite fit in, Jam is persistent in his mission, lightheartedly singing about meat and chasing his tale like the other dogs. A beautifully drawn and well-crafted animation, this short has an uplifting message about finding the place you belong for yourself and being who you want to be. This message carried across several of the other films, with A Cat Called Jam offering an excellent start to the group.

The second film of the selection, Bryony Dunne’s Above the Law, explored communities in transit, cleverly drawing comparisons between paths of migratory birds and the, usually fraught, journeys of refugees and migrants. While the birds move freely, as they wish, between locations, closely examined only by birdwatchers, the refugees are instead seen by surveillance cameras patrolling borders, or those who must be ready to rescue them from overflowing boats. Moving between Cairo, Lesvos and Donegal, with narration from both migrants and those looking out for them, the film lets us literally fly along with the birds (with cameras attached) as we are grounded by the words spoken by these individuals. Above the Law faces difficult realities in a poetic and hopeful way, drawing to a close with a Syrian refugee in Ireland commenting that his “Irish passport is now [his] wings”.

A Better You, written and directed by Eamonn Murphy, brings us to a well-designed modern steampunk world with the advanced technology of programmable carbon clones alongside computers that are cranked to scroll through pages as you would archival material. In this setting, a shy man, Douglas (Seán T. Ó Meallaigh) finally decides to purchase a “better version” of himself to go on a date with a girl he likes. Ó Meallaigh’s performance and the production design are both very strong and, after some light-hearted scenes setting up the clone, we are left with a similar message to that in A Cat Called Jam—that it is best to be yourself.

Ruari Robinson’s Corporate Monster takes a turn toward horror as an overworked and recently laid-off man in NYC takes some untested pills to help with his exhaustion. These further unravel him, causing him to see monsters all around him who pose as humans—from policemen to his former boss. Are the pills making him unstable, causing him to go on a rampage, or are they exposing the truth of the creatures living amongst us? The fast-paced Corporate Monster keeps you guessing with its impressive looking creatures, and makes you consider the perils of losing oneself in work and greed. It also offers some well-placed political commentary as the first appearances of these creatures are surrounding Trump on the stage during a televised speech.

Welcome to a Bright White Limbo, directed by Cara Holmes, documents the creative process of dancer and choreographer of Oona Doherty. As Doherty explains that she had moved to Belfast from London, didn’t feel she fit in, and found a way to express herself through movement, we see her practicing her choreography in the street of a housing estate, as well as in an auditorium. This movement embodies not only herself, but the local identity. Welcome to a Bright White Limbo is artistically shot, capturing the arresting and emotive movements of Doherty, and offering insight into the thoughtful construction of her award-winning show, Hope Hunt.

In Claire Byrne’s Sister This, a simple phone conversation between two sisters reveals a depth of emotion and shines a light on the struggle to get by, and what is sometimes sacrificed to do it. With one sister abroad for work, and the other taking care of her son, they argue over the mother missing the boy’s birthday and about the safety of her line of work. Charlie Bailey and Jordanne Jones deliver strong performances as the sisters, packing this short with an emotional punch.

Based on Ryan’s essay “The Fear of Winning”, Iseult Howlett’s cleverly named The Grass Ceiling is a short documentary in which three of Ireland successful female athletes—Rianna Jarrett, Elise O’Byrne White and Ryan herself—relate what sport means to them. Through this a portrait is spun of powerful, inspiring women who resist constrictive and conservative gender expectations. Finding their place and their confidence through their athleticism, these women serve as strong role models. The Grass Ceiling rightfully showcases their talents and perspectives, which are often overlooked in favour of the male athletes who are more frequently in the spotlight, and is itself a powerful and inspiring film.

Sophia Tamburrini’s Maya stars Pat Shortt as Ken, who lives happily connected to a machine that simulates his reality using his memories. However, as his payments for this run out, he will soon be confronted by reality. Maya sensitively explores loss and what grief can do to a person—replaying memories and subtly overwriting them through time until we are faced with a new reality. Tamburrini smartly uses elements of sci-fi in this film as a way to confront what are equally natural processes. 

Kalchalka, directed by Gar O’Rourke, documents “the world’s most hardcore gym”—Kiev’s outdoor Soviet scrap metal gym, offering a snapshot of the day-to-day running of this unique place and the variety of individuals that use it. Well put-together shots tell the story of this space as its caretaker brings us through it, providing several humorous moments. The gym equipment and construction is interesting in itself, but the glimpses we are given of the characters that populate it leave an even bigger impression. Personalities are well-captured here, often simply through gesture.

Finally, rounding off the programme was Brendan Canty’s Cork-based Christy, which received quite a few cheers from the home crowd. This short follows a 16-year-old as he goes on a disappointing job interview and is brought back to good spirits by his friends. Showing off plenty of Cork charm, in a similar vein to The Young Offenders, the film deftly moved between heartfelt moments and humour, ending the Screen Ireland World Premiere Shorts with plenty of laughs.

 

The Screen Ireland World Premiere Shorts programme screened on 16th Nov 2019  as part of the Cork Film Festival (7 – 17 November 2019).

 

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Review of Irish Film @ Cork Film Festival 2019: Cork on Camera

Emma Keyes checks out a programme of Cork-themed films from collections at the IFI Irish Film Archive. 

The Cork on Camera programme, put together by the Irish Film Institute, consisted of short films made in and about Cork between, with the earliest from 1902 and the latest from 1978.  The sound section included a short documentary about the sculptor Seamus Murphy, “The Silent Art” from 1959, directed by Louis Marcus, a half-travelogue, half-advertisement commissioned by the DuPont Chemical Company in 1978, “Travels Through Erin”, and a short film directed by Colin Hill in 1972 called “Dark Moon Hollow”. The silent section included three very short films by the Kenyon and Mitchell Film Company from 1902 and an un-finished travelogue, “Car Touring,” directed by Jim Mullerns in 1965. Paul Smith provided improvised piano accompaniment to the silent portion of the program.

“The Silent Art” looks at Cork through the lens of Murphy’s work there. The narration states, “These are people of character in a city of contrasts,” but the twelve-minute film does not much delve into what exactly makes Cork a city of contrasts. Still, the film lingers over Murphy’s work all over Cork, including the Church of Annunciation and sculptures and carvings at University College Cork and the Cork City Hospital. The bells of Shandon Tower serve as a auditory through line as the film returns to them again and again. We get an inside look at Murphy’s studio and Murphy and his young daughter as he works on a bust of her. The film ends with some musings on Cork and art. The film is a worthwhile historical glimpse of a city and one of its storied residents. “The Silent Art” can be viewed on the IFI Player online.

“Travels Through Erin” shows Ireland through the eyes of outsiders. (“Beauty abounds in the land of the leprechaun” is a real line that is said in this short.) The film could be compared to cotton candy for its airy quality and lack of substance, but it was an enjoyable watch nonetheless. More than a film, this piece is an advertisement for the sweaters made out of the acrylic yarn created by the DuPont Chemical Company, but the models are charming and beautiful and they pose in all kinds of picturesque locations around County Cork. Sometimes there’s no need for more.

An elderly man (played by James Dempsey with voiceover narration by Dan Donovan) goes on a journey “walking the River Lee to its source in Gouganne Barra” in “Dark Moon Hollow.” This lovely little film takes its time following this man from one end of County Cork to the other and listening to his musings about life as he goes. As the man says at one point, “London is a long way off from this place.” The bells of Shandon feature again, of course, as one of County Cork’s most distinctive sounds and views. Although mostly in English, the man includes some Irish, some of which he translates and some of which he leaves untranslated: a small prize for those in the know. And Gouganne Barra looks much the same now as it does in the images in this film from 1972. 

The three Kenyon and Mitchell films are examples of early “actuality films”. Each short is only a minute or two long and shows Cork City people going about their lives. “Tram Ride from King’s Street to St. Patrick’s Bridge, Cork” and “Views of the Grand Parade, Cork” both show the streetscape, complete with streetcars with open double-decker tops, horses pulling carts, and people of all stripes walking the streets. “Cork Fire Brigade Turning Out” showcases the Cork Fire Brigade as they go through various fire-fighting exercises. These three shorts are entertaining as a small anthropological glimpse into Cork City of more than a century ago.

Finally, the last film in the programme, the unfinished travelogue, “Car Touring” exudes 1960s vibrancy. The clothing, the hairstyles, the cars, the furniture, and just about everything else speak to such a specific historical moment. The unnamed people/characters eat and drink their way around County Cork, seeing Ireland in the way that most people say you should: just driving around and stopping when you feel like it. They kiss the Blarney Stone, they go to Kinsale, they stroll the streets of Cork City. Life unfolds around them in both color and black and white footage. The film match cuts scenes of a young woman driving one car with a young man in the passenger seat with another young woman driving a second car. That film also cuts to various gorgeous shots of the Cork landscape. It’s just a shame this film was never finished, but I found it delightful to watch nonetheless and the piano accompaniment here was particularly good.

 

The Cork on Camera programme screened on Fri., 16th Nov 2019  as part of the Cork Film Festival (7 – 17 November 2019).

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