The Movie Brothers – Part 2: Patrick Houlihan


John and Patrick Houlihan at Newsman Scoring Stage at 20th Century Fox Studios (pic: John Houlihan)

The Movie Brothers – Part 2: Patrick Houlihan

By

James Bartlett

Last month we spoke to John Houlihan, Senior Vice President of Music at 20th Century Fox film studios, and this month we’re going to get the other side of the sibling story by seeing what his younger brother Patrick (who also has the same job at the same studio!) has to say for himself.

Patrick was born in Waukegan, Illinois (just outside of Chicago), and the family moved to the East Coast when he was very young. Like John he was largely brought up in New Jersey, and he also agreed that “rowdy” was a “very accurate description of our childhood. I am still not sure how our parents survived the chaos,” he laughed.

Today Patrick lives in Los Angeles with his wife and two young teenage daughters, but he still remembers growing up hearing some legendary stories about the Houlihan’s Irish ancestry.  

“As far I am aware, we are direct descendants of Fionn mac Cumhaill himself,” he said, adding that his brother John has been investigating their lineage. “He keeps promising that we will need to go scour every pub in Ireland to verify his findings, so I keep a bag packed, my passport close to hand, and I patiently await his call to action.”  

Patrick has visited Ireland before, spending a summer taking some courses at University of Galway during his college years.

“While pretending to study, I spent most of my time trying to see and experience as much of the country as I could. Some memorable moments took place at the Cliffs of Moher, the Guinness Factory and the Dingle Peninsula, but most of all I enjoyed spending time at local pubs meeting the incredible folks of Ireland – friendliest people on the planet. All in all, it was an incredible experience.”

Asked about his job as a music supervisor, Patrick said that “most days I’m on urgent conference calls from the moment I pull out of my driveway. Then I may go to a “spotting session” with a composer and set of filmmakers to figure out the best way to use songs and score throughout each scene of their film.”

There could be many other tasks, including going to vocal sessions to work with an actor who must pre-record their singing for an upcoming music scene, “grinding” on song deal negotiations to get prices down, or simply convincing the owners of a song to approve a clearance request.

There are of course lots of meetings – “sometimes I even have meetings about meetings!” – and every couple of weeks there is usually a test screening “where 400 people from the real world are watching a rough cut of a film and rating all of the elements including the music.”

No two days are the same it seems, but Patrick reckons he is fortunate to have a job that provides him with so many varied experiences. John and Patrick work together regularly, and Patrick says that “while we don’t know absolutely everything about all music, we do know how to discover it all and how to apply it to a film.”

Aside from the huge moments like the Disney takeover, the music business has changed a great deal over the last few decades too, going from vinyl to online streaming.

No matter what the format is however, Patrick says he “still enjoys looking for the needle in the haystack. I think that the digital age and streaming has really opened up a ton of incredible access to music and artists that 15-20 years ago I might not have ever been privy to. They’re very powerful tools.”

He admits that he misses holding CD artwork and thumbing through liner notes, but streaming and the internet is “such a deeper and quicker dive into a new artist. With just a few clicks you get videos, live performances, additional photos, interviews and more. Honestly, I find it pretty mind blowing.”

Unusually, Patrick and John work in the same job and at the same place – but both have different stories of how they ended up where they are today.

“Out of the Blue” by Electric Light Orchestra was the first album I ever bought,” said Patrick. “I was 10 years old, and my brother “co-financed” the deal with me – I guess you could say that is when our collaborative spirit began!”  

He admits that the pair have always loved discovering, creating and exploiting music, and that “it has always come naturally to us. One of us is always spouting out song ideas or suggesting composers for the other’s latest film project.”

As mentioned last month, it was John who was the first to move to Los Angeles with the express purpose to get into music supervision. The year was 1992 and he had just $200 in his pocket, but in time he hired Patrick at the small company he co-founded. John’s wife Julie and another of their brothers, Kevin, works with them today too.

“Yes,” said Patrick. “I do credit John with giving me my start and mentoring me through the dark art of music supervision when old dinosaurs like him roamed the earth, and it is a blast to be able to work closely with him every day.”

“However,” he adds ominously, “in regards to some of John’s “superiority” claims in his interview… well, that is just the drink talking!”

Both brothers have had some memorable moments, and while John told us about using psychic powers on Aretha Franklin and tip-toeing past bodyguards to see a famous rap artist, Patrick says that he has to pinch himself all the time on what he calls a “rollercoaster ride.”  

He did mention a couple of times though.

“I have had the privilege to score Ridley Scott films at Abbey Road Studios, shoot music videos with Celine Dion and Ryan Reynolds in Las Vegas (the famous “Ashes” song from Deadpool 2, which went viral and has close to 60m views on YouTube), and I taught Emma Stone how to play bass. It’s all a dream!”

Outside of work, Patrick is soccer-obsessed. “Whether it is watching Liverpool inch closer to the EPL Title, coaching my girl’s teams, playing pick-up games, or googling “best goals ever scored,” I love everything to do with the sport, and it is what fills most of my time away from film music.”

As for his favorite project, Patrick said generously that his best moments come “when an original song and original score intertwine,” singling out one especially: the collaboration between film composer Teddy Shapiro and singer/songwriter Jose Gonzalez on their score to the Ben Stiller movie The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, which included the “stunning” original song called “Stay Alive.”  

As far as the worst one project he had even worked on, he was more discreet: “My mother taught us that “if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all!”

Finally, we asked Patrick about his most unusual interest. John had mentioned his love of painting houses, a habit he had picked up working for a company during college breaks, and Patrick had a similar outdoorsy hobby.

“I have a great affection for landscaping – specifically lawn mowing. As a kid, I monopolized the market in our neighborhood, and professional landscapers despised me because I undercut their fees and would end up doing a better job than they could. I find it to be incredibly soothing and get such instant gratification from the end result. In fact, the high art that I bring to lawn mowing is often compared to Michelangelo!”

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Review of Irish Film @ DIFF 2019: When Hitchcock Met O’Casey

 

David Deignan checks out  Brian O’ Flaherty’s documentary When Hitchcock Met O’Casey,  which tells the fascinating story of Irish playwright Sean O’Casey and English filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock’s 1930 collaboration on one of the early British ‘talkies’ – an adaptation of O’Casey’s Juno and the Paycock.


It’s not often that Sean O’Casey and Alfred Hitchcock are mentioned in the same sentence, let alone thought of as close collaborators. The latter, oft hailed as the ‘Master of Suspense’, is a household name; renowned as one of the most significant and influential filmmakers to have ever lived. The former was, and still is, a widely celebrated writer and memoirist whose work is synonymous with Dublin’s Abbey Theatre. The Abbey produced the three plays collectively recognized as O’Casey’s crowning achievement: The Shadow of a Gunman (1923), Juno and the Paycock (1924) and The Plough and the Stars (1926).

O’Casey emerged from Dublin’s poorest people; he was the first playwright of note to write about the experiences of the city’s working class, electrifying the Abbey stage – which was sustained in its early years by his work. By the end of the 1920s, with his art receiving international acclaim, O’Casey had moved to London where Alfred Hitchcock had already directed ten films, the majority of which were silent.

It was the London premiere of Juno and the Paycock, in 1925, which brought the pair together for an unlikely project. Hitchcock adored the play and approached O’Casey with a view to adapting it for the silver screen. The Dubliner gave the filmmaker his blessing and the resulting film, released in 1930, turned out be something of an anomaly; an oft-forgotten and rarely talked about footnote in the outstanding careers of the two men. This documentary by director Brian O’Flaherty sets out to tell the story behind this altogether strange production and assess its place in the canon of each artist’s work.

O’Flaherty’s film opens by contrasting the dichotomous backgrounds and upbringings of the two men. Through examining their early lives and careers, we learn about their totally different personalities and the documentary begins to hint that maybe – just maybe – the pair aren’t going to see eye to eye on every issue  that arises during the production of Juno. The documentary decides to act as a study of these two characters just as much as it focuses on the making of the film. Structurally, this approach works well. It serves to ground the audience in the lives of both Hitchcock and O’Casey, while contextualising the world to which the screen adaptation of Juno arrived.

The medium of cinema was still in its relative infancy, and Juno – which the doc states Hitchcock originally envisioned as a silent film – was produced during a period of great change, as sound-on-film was fast becoming the standard for motion pictures. As a result, Juno inadvertently became one of Britain’s first “talkies”. What’s so fascinating about this from a contemporary point of view is seeing Hitchcock who was still unfamiliar with this unheralded form of cinema and, like everyone else, had to learn the ropes.

O’Flaherty’s documentary does a brilliant job of depicting this side of the production, showing the great director getting to grips with the new technology and exploring how this presented inevitable problems for his shoot. The documentary has managed to obtain a great deal of archive footage as well as clips from the film and snippets of interviews with Hitchcock himself, which imbue these stories with an immediacy and intimacy, making them feel contemporary despite being almost a century old.

The stories of Juno’s production are really interesting, and the documentary is smart to intersperse the clips of Hitchcock – with his droll demeanour and wry sense of humour – throughout the film, with the director almost guiding us through the story of his project. The documentary also features a host of other engaging interviewees, the majority of whom are associated with O’Casey. These include Joe Mooney of the East Wall Historical Group and the writer’s daughter Shivaun, both of whom give valuable insight into the Dubliner’s life and, in the case of the latter especially, provide a sense about how he felt personally about Hitchcock and the eventual final version of Juno. Alongside the talking-head interviews and found footage, the documentary is punctuated by inserts of still drawings by Peter Marry.

As a fan of Juno, as well as both artists’ work, I can’t help but wonder whether the documentary would need an audience to be familiar with the play to fully appreciate this documentary. It wouldn’t be strictly necessary, but some of the production stories are undoubtedly helped by a knowledge of the source material.

The fact that Alfred Hitchcock and Sean O’Casey are so different, both as artists and as people, is what makes this story enticing. The documentary is at its strongest when it focuses on the interaction between the pair, as their lives and careers dovetailed momentarily, and there is part of me that wishes O’Flaherty had been able to focus more on their relationship and deliver a more personal account of their brief partnership.

Nevertheless, When Hitchcock Met O’Casey is a well researched and executed historical study of a truly enigmatic film and a fascinating examining of an oft-forgotten collaboration.




When Hitchcock Met O’Casey screened on 21st February 2019 as part of the Dublin International Film Festival (20th February – 3rd March).

 

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Review: Little

DIR: Tina Gordon • WRI: Tina Gordon, Tracy Oliver • PRO: Kenya Barris, James Lopez, Will Packer • ED: David Moritz • DES: Keith Brian Burns • MUS: Germaine Franco • CAST: Justin Hartley, Regina Hall, Marsai Martin

Little pits its three gifted comedic actors against the conventions of mainstream Hollywood comedies. In the battle what’s left is a middling film with some intermittently very funny scenes. It does not reach the highs of say Girls Trip or Spy but ranks above dreck like Identity Thief or The Change-Up.

Rising star Issa Rae (HBO’s Insecure) plays April, the overworked assistant to Scary Movie’s Regina Hall’s Jordan, a ruthless highly-strung tech mogul. As a result of being bullied as a child, the boss has grown cruel, treating everyone at her office like trash. After Jordan berates the daughter of a street vendor who made her angry, the young girl places a spell on her. The boss wakes up the next morning in the body of her young self, played by Black-ish’s Marsai Martin.

Based on an idea by its 14-year-old lead and executive producer, Little works best as a star vehicle for Martin and Rae. The film really comes alive in its middle portion, putting April and young Jordan together for a string of misadventures – such as having to deal with a child protective service agent (the great Rachel Dratch). It’s always funny when children act like grown-ups and Martin manages to charm while nailing the ‘take no prisoners’ attitude of her adult self. Bounce that against the perpetually cheery Rae and it’s a winning combination.

However, like a lot of plot-driven comedy, somewhere along the way the jokes grow infrequent. This is because the movie starts hammering home its simple message – that adults should embrace their inner child more as kids are purer and more idealistic. Concluding with Jordan taking part in the same talent show that led her to be bullied in the past, performing one of the movie’s many dance routines, the viewer just wishes that time was seeded to more of Martin and Rae’s witty banter.

There’s also other issues like the completely redundant bookending narration by Regina Hall and the fact that even before the magical sub-plot is introduced, nothing in the movie feels rooted in any tangible reality. In regards the latter, if anyone acted like Hall’s Jordan in real life they would be arrested. While this is forgivable as Little is a fantastical comedy, it’s hard not to feel that if the movie made adult Jordan feel even slightly realistic and had her tech company offices resemble a real-life workplace, the viewer might relate more to Little’s characters by the time the shift into fantasy comes.

Lacking gross-out gags, the movie will appeal to all audiences – something uncommon in the landscape of modern Hollywood comedies. If you are looking for a light movie where talented comediens dress in the most fabulous clothes, Little is a fine way to spend about 100 minutes.

Stephen Porzio

108 minutes

12A (see IFCO for details)

Little is released 12th April 2019

Little – Official Website

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Alan Mulligan, Writer/Director of ‘The Limit Of’

James Allen (Laurence O’Fuarain) is a successful, controlling, thirty-something banker living alone and working in Dublin city at the tail-end of the recession. When a family tragedy occurs at the hands of his employer he decides to take action which forces him to face a terrible childhood secret. Meanwhile, his mysterious co-worker Alison (IFTA-nominated Sarah Carroll) has her own agenda, which puts her on a collision course with James, triggering a dark spiral of deceit, revenge, and murder.

Gemma Creagh met up with writer/director Alan Mulligan to talk about his look at modern-day greed and desire, and society’s ever-growing need for control.


The Limit Of was released in cinemas on 5th April 2019 and is still playing in The Eye Galway and Mayo Movie World.

 

Film Ireland Podcasts

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Irish Film Review: Greta

DIR: Neil Jordan WRI: Ray Wright, Neil Jordan PRO: Lawrence Bender, James Flynn, Sidney Kimmel, John Penotti DOP: Seamus McGarvey ED: Nick Emerson PRO: Anna Rackard CAST: Isabelle Huppert, Chloë Grace Moretz, Maika Monroe, Stephen Rea

Boston native Frances (Moretz) is newly moved to New York and working as a waitress in an upmarket restaurant. Still grieving the death of her mother, she is warned by her housemate Erica (Monroe) that her good-natured ways could be taken advantage of in the Big Apple and that she needs to become more streetwise. Frances doesn’t heed Erica’s advice when she finds a designer bag left on the subway and tracks down its owner, Greta (Huppert), a lonely, widowed pianist. Frances and Greta immediately strike up a bond, Greta becoming the mother-figure Frances yearns for. However, it soon becomes apparent that there may be more malevolent elements to Greta’s character than first appeared.

Neil Jordan returns to our screens with this entertaining, daft thriller which calls to mind 90’s stalker films such as Single White Female. Unquestionably the highlight of the film is the peerless Isabelle Huppert, who you can sense is having an enormous amount of fun in such a scenery-chewing role. Huppert has evidenced time and again her capacity to author a film through her performance. While her role here does not allow for the same level of complexity as she had in the recent Elle, the material and role are unquestionably elevated by her imagination and charisma. Of the other actors, Moretz gives solid support as the naive Frances. Monroe works hard in a somewhat thankless role that could have done with further development. Stephen Rea’s appearance in a cameo role confirms that we are indeed watching a Neil Jordan film.

There’s a breeziness to Jordan’s direction here which suits the material well. He’s well aware of the film’s silliness and milks it for as much fun as he can. Seamus McGarvey’s cinematography is lush and seductive in a very classical sense, while Dublin does a good job of standing in for New York. There are some fairly gaping plot-holes and the film’s script is often quite predictable, particularly one final twist, which feels utterly signposted. Flaws such as these, however, don’t seem out of place in the heightened, winking world of the film.

Beyond another masterclass from Huppert, this not a film that will likely linger long in the memory, but it remains a polished, self-aware and highly diverting piece.  

David Prendeville

99 minutes
15A (see IFCO for details)
Greta is released 19th April 2019

 

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Film Ireland Podcast: Episode 34 – Eat Your Slops

 

In a Brexit-themed show, our podders, Sarah Cullen and Richard Drumm, discuss junk-checking in Captain Marvel, whip out the Irish Bleakometre for The Miami Showband Massacre, The Hole in the Ground, and Shooting the Mafia. There’s chat about the buffed fingers of Free Solo, the Peeping Toms of Under the Silver Lake, the harsh yellows of At Eternity’s Gate with Willem Dafoe’s demon face and the tragic horror of Us.

 

Film Ireland Podcasts

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Call For: Inward Production Coordinator @ Screen Ireland

Reporting directly to the Inward Production Manager this role supports the Inward Production Department in attracting international film and television production to Ireland as well as supporting national projects in Ireland.  The candidate will be responsible for project monitoring, online locations database management and website content as well as the creation of marketing materials for producers/ studio executives. The candidate will assist the Inward Production Manager with project queries, locations recces and scouts, and in the key priorities of enhancing film production across Ireland and the promotion of the Irish film industry on an international level.  Key to this role will be providing necessary administrative support to the Inward Production Manager in a very fast-paced, dynamic environment.

Click here To find out more about the role, including key responsibilities and the application process.

 

Fis Eireann/Screen Ireland is the national development agency for Irish film and animation investing in Talent, Creativity and Enterprise. The agency also supports and promotes the Irish film industry and the use of Ireland as a location for international production.

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Call For: Applications for Pitching Forum at the Norwegian Short Film Festival

 

PARTICIPATE IN A PITCHING FORUM AT THE NORWEGIAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL

Calling all filmmakers! As a Screen Talent Europe partner, the Galway Film Centre is delighted to announce that applications for the Pitching Forum at the Norwegian Short Film Festival are now open. Screen Talent Europe in collaboration with The Norwegian Short Film Festival invite emerging producers, directors and screenwriters from Europe to pitch new short film projects at the festival in Grimstad, Norway, June 12th–14th 2019.

It is free to participate and the costs of transportation and accommodation (3 nights) will be covered by Screen Talent Europe. The best pitch will receive a production grant of €4000.

10 short films will be pitched during the Pitching Forum. In a 5-minute pitch, each participant will present their project to a pitching jury and an audience of potential co-producers, financiers and filmmakers attending the festival.

The Galway Film Centre selected Mia Mullarkey to pitch at the 2018 Norwegian Film Festival. Read all about her experience here.

Applications terms

Producers, directors and screenwriters must have produced at least 2 films (short fiction or documentary).

You must apply with a project in development (fiction or documentary) with a maximum length of 30 min.

What you get

As well as attending the pitch you will take part in:

  • a pitching workshop
  • networking activities
  • speed dating with the partners in the Screen Talent Europe network. During these meetings you will be informed about co-support and co-production possibilities available within the partners support systems

You will also get a free accreditation for the entire festival program.

Application deadline: May 8th 2019. APPLY HERE

For further information, please contact:

Jade Murphy – jade@galwayfilmcentre.ie

About:

Screen Talent Europe
Screen Talent Europe is a network of film centers working with talent development in Europe. Screen Talent Europe aims to create more co-production, network and collaborations between emerging filmmakers in Europe.

The Norwegian Short Film Festival
The Norwegian Short Film Festival is a short film and documentary festival with a competition programme for Norwegian and International short film, Norwegian documentaries and Music Videos. In addition to the award programmes, the festival present international documentaries, arrange workshops and seminars, concerts and boat trips.

The competition programme for international short films attracts filmmakers from all over the world to Grimstad, and the festival facilitates for bonds to be tied between the Norwegian and the international film community.

The Pitching Forum is organized by Mediefabrikken, the Screen Talent Europe partners and The Norwegian Short Film Festival.

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Cinemagic Film & Television Festival

Cinemagic Film and Television Festival for Young People returns to Dublin this May and June with a programme jam packed full of diverse creative opportunities to inspire and motivate young people. This year will see a number of new exciting elements added to the programme and visits from representatives from Aardman Animations, Brown Bag Films and Cartoon Saloon! A new screening series entitled Talking Pictures will offer the chance to view Irish movies with talks from filmmakers and film professionals involved in the productions. Among the industry names who will take part will be Frank Berry, Carmel Winters, Lee Cronin, Aislinn Clarke, Paddy Breathnach and Andrew and Ryan Tohill. For an even more immersive experience, young people can be part of the first Cinemagic Talent Lab Boot Camp  for 16+yr olds and it will include masterclasses, seminars and Q&A’s with film professionals who will provide insight into the industry in a range of disciplines such as Production Management, Assistant Directing, Editing, Camera, Sound, Art Department & Costume, Hair and Makeup and Location Management.

Cinemagic Chief Executive, Joan Burney Keatings MBE said “We are thrilled to present our 12th Cinemagic Dublin Festival programme and we are really excited about this year’s line-up of diverse, creative film opportunities. We are looking forward to meeting lots of festival goers and celebrating film talent across a wide range of disciplines and in doing so helping to educate, inspire and motivate young people.”

For the full programme and how to book tickets go to: cinemagic.ie

OPENING FILM:

The opening film of the 2019 festival will be an Irish Premiere of Racetime, a wild adventure through the trials and tribulations, passions, joys and little victories of childhood. The premiere takes place on the 28th May at 7.00pm in ODEON Point Square.

 

BOOT CAMP

The Cinemagic Talent Lab Boot Camp is a one-day event in Liffey Trust Studios for new entrants to the film and television industry or those interested in entering. The Boot Camp programme is aimed at aged 16+ year olds and will include masterclasses, seminars and Q&A’s with film professionals who will provide insight into the industry in a range of disciplines. This is a great opportunity for new entrants to learn more about the film and television industry, gain insight from industry professionals, network with other new entrants and develop knowledge and key skills.

 

TALKING PICTURES:

A series of film screenings and talks with filmmakers and film professionals celebrating Irish filmmaking talent and offering advice and top tips for young people with an interest in a career in film.

Screenings include the winner of Best Irish Film at Galway’s Fleadh, Michael Inside plus Q&A with Frank Berry; Float Like A Butterfly plus Q&A with Carmel Winters, a gloriously unruly collision of vivid romanticism and tough, unsentimental truths about the hardscrabble lives and casual discrimination faced by Irish travellers; the suspense filled supernatural thriller, The Hole In The Ground plus Q&A with Lee Cronin; The Devil’s Doorway plus Q&A with Aislinn Clarke, a confident and timely chiller and the first feature horror film written and directed by an Irish woman; Rosieplus Q&A with Paddy Breathnach, an examination of how even in times of crises, the love and strength of a family can endure and The Dig plus Q&A with brothers Andrew Tohill and Ryan Tohill, a gripping debut feature from award-winning Irish directors Andrew and Ryan Tohill. Filmmakers Lee Cronin and Andrew and Ryan Tohill are success stories from Cinemagic Film Festival as winners of Cinemagic’s annual Young Filmmaker Competition.

 

SHORTS FOR SHORTIES:

A new addition to the programme this year will be a collection of new short animations designed to appeal to young children. They express colourful, exciting and easy to follow stories, either in English or with no dialogue.

These short movies packaged over 60 minutes take place in ODEON Point Square and include Sam’s Dream, about a small mouse who decides to make his dream come true; A Tiger With No StripesMatilda, a little girl who overcomes her fear and discovers magic of the night, Belly Flop, a story of persistence; Miriam By The Lake, the story of a restless chicken who makes the acquaintance of spooky night creatures; a beautiful story of inclusion in CoucouleursCycle, where a young girl discovers that true adventure begins where the road ends; 6.1, a story with a girl and a cat that is full of surprises; To & Kym, two little creatures who chase each other around the busy streets of Toyko as they re-enact a game that has lasted hundreds of years and Lost & Found, about a clumsy crochet dinosaur must unravel itself to save the love of its life.

MOVIES FOR KIDS:

Young film buffs will be spoilt for choice as the festival invites them to immerse themselves in a myriad of movies all screening at the ODEON Point Square over the first weekend of the festival, the 1st and 2nd of June.

Choose from Revolting Rhymes, your favourite Nursery Rhymes retold by the master of story-telling, made complete with an ever-so wicked Roald Dahl twist; family favourites The Gruffalo’s Child and The Highway Rat, a fabulous, rollicking adventure inspired by the famous Alfred Noyes poem, and ‘Princess Emmy, animated entertainment aimed at fans of princesses and magic.

 

NEW FAMILY FILMS

Cinemagic will also bring a whole range of new films to the ODEON Point Square for the whole family to enjoy over the June bank holiday.

The fast paced, adventure packed titles include Dino King: Journey To Fire Mountain, an action-packed family adventure that combines the realism of ‘Walking with Dinosaurs’ with the heart of ‘Finding Nemo’; Alone In Space, a high concept, family sci-fi, bolstered by sharp production design and visual effects; the magical Ötzi And The Mystery Of TimeBelle And Sebastian, Friends For Life, the story of a loving grandfather and grandson set out on a quest to save their dog, set high in the French Alps and Captain Morten And The Spider Queen where viewers will follow Morten on his shrunken adventure!

 

WORLD CINEMA

Cinemagic will present a feast of films from all over the world for 12+ year olds focusing on themes of love, justice, friendship and family. A Colony, a film that sees young teenagers in search for a place where they can be themselves; Dilili In Paris, the latest offering from movie maestro, Michel Ocelot with an evocative animation that see a young girls fight for justice; The Runaways, an atmospheric and uplifting celebration of childhood and family; My Extraordinary Summer With Tess, a young boy learns the importance of family and friends during his adventures with his new friend, Tess; Fight Girl which explores real life issues around family and an acrimonious divorce; Funan, a thrilling story of love, loss and enduring hope in the most trying of times; the irresistible comedy AmateursThe War Game, a thought-provoking and tense youth drama and Bruce Lee And The Outlaw, a modern-day Oliver Twist story set under the streets of Bucharest.

FILM JURIES

The Festival is recruiting three film juries for June to watch new films from around the world, take part in in film reviewing and critiquing workshops and meet like-minded young people.  For more information email juries@cinemagic.ie for details on sessions for 8—11 yr olds, 12-14yr olds and 15-18yr olds.

 

 

CREATIVITY CORNER

Highlights include Lego Animation workshops with Joel Simon and ‘Model Making’ with Aardman Animations, where participants will learn how to make their very own Feathers, Gromit or Shaun the Sheep character. Mårten Jönmark, Brown Bag Films (Doc McStuffins, Peter Rabbit) will host a storyboarding workshop sharing skills on telling stories visually and Caoimhe Ní Bhrádaigh, Cartoon Saloon (The Secret of Kells, Song of the Sea, The Breadwinner) will present a workshop exploring the science behind the magic of animation.

Young people can also learn how to tell a short story in a storyboard with David Bunting’s fun-filled workshop inspired by his 20 years’ experience working on projects such as Disney’s The Tigger Movie, Shaun The Sheep, Bob The Builder and Dennis & Gnasher.

 

FILM EDUCATION (Schools)

Secondary Schools and Colleges can avail of costume making, props making and creative writing workshops and unique film screenings accompanied with short talks from production crew members. The films include Keepers of the Flame and a Q&A with its Writer/Director, Nuala O’Connor and The Camino Voyage and a Q&A with Director Donal O’Ceilleachair and Zoo with a Q&A by Producer Katy Jackson and Director Colin McIvor.  These will provide an invaluable insight to the filmmaking process and the social issues around the stories. The highly acclaimed filmFree Solo will be introduced by Mountaineering Ireland, and a screening of Captain Marvel is accompanied with a workshop on film classification from IFCO.

Primary Schools have a feast of film events to choose from with How To Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World, The Gruffalo’s Child The Highway Rat, The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part, Dumbo, Revolting Rhymes and a workshop ‘The Science of Roald Dahl’, Aladdin and Disney Ireland/Industry Trust Q&A, Peppa Pig: Festival of Fun and a Drama session, and Matilda andstorytelling with Jack Lynch.  Both Secondary Schools and Primary Schools can enjoy movie screenings of shorts packages in their classroom accompanied by review sessions with the Cinemagic team.

Nursery schools can get involved in drama workshops and screenings of short animations from around the world in their own nursery/pre-school and immerse themselves in a cinematic experience.

Cinemagic Chief Executive, Joan Burney Keatings MBE said “We are thrilled to present our 12th Cinemagic Dublin Festival programme and we are excited about this year’s line-up of diverse, creative film opportunities. We are looking forward to meeting lots of festival goers and celebrating film talent across a wide range of disciplines and in doing so helping to educate, inspire and motivate young people.”

Cinemagic Dublin is funded by the Department of Education and Skills.

 

Booking Details:

All public films and events www.eventbrite.ie or www.cinemagic.ie

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Irish Film Review: The Limit Of

 

DIR/WRI: Alan Mulligan • PRO: Taine King, Alan Mulligan, Anthony Mulligan, Tim Palmer • DOP: Daniel Sorin Balteanu • ED: Alan Mulligan, Tim Palmer, Daniel Sorin Balteanu • DES: Lilla Nurie • CAST: Laurence O’Fuarain, Joanne Brennan, Des Carney

 

In Alan Mulligan’s The Limit Of, we are introduced to our lead character James, a distant, meticulous figure, as he runs through Dublin at night, headphones in, ignoring all around him. Immediately, the film’s visuals work hard and effectively to situate James within the wider context of 21st century, modernizing Dublin as we see him run along the Samuel Beckett Bridge and by other recognizable modern landmarks and architecture. And soon, as we cut to the next day when James’ day job is revealed to us, we can see why. James is a banker and the film is, to a certain extent, a kind of state of the nation (or at least state of the city) piece.

James witnesses first-hand the cruelty of his employers to a stranger and then to a loved one. He sits through meetings whose participants could have been side characters in Glengarry Glen Ross, except that their seediness and vile intentions would have overshadowed that film’s main cast.

Indeed, characterization in this film can be somewhat lacking. The bankers in this film, with two exceptions, are just evil. Aside from James himself, characters are generally one-note and their motivations simplistic. In the case of the bankers though, their uncomplicated evil does make it clear the stance this film is taking on the state of 21st century Ireland: banks exert an inordinate amount of control on the lives of Irish people, especially on the sick, elderly, and otherwise vulnerable, and the manner in which control is exerted is entirely avaricious. It is not a nuanced take on the state of modern Ireland, but an admirably bitter diatribe against the impersonal state of modern financial institutions, though it is perhaps a bit undercut by the cartoony, villainous dialogue of characters who run those institutions.

Dialogue and the relationships among the film’s small cast of characters in general are often an issue in this film, which does not aid in the believability of these characters or their plight.  In particular, a sexual subplot involving James which features awkward dialogue with a co-worker and lingering shots of him staring at her groin feels stilted at best and a bit exploitative at worst. That’s not to say that these actors don’t give strong performances. Special praise must go to Sonya O’Donoghue who gives a wonderful performance in the brief time she is in the film. The issue is just that the relationships between characters are not compelling or heartfelt enough to carry the film.

To uncover the real strength of the film we must turn back to its visuals. There’s a coldness to them. We do not often see the Georgian centre of Dublin, but instead see rectangular architecture and cold fluorescent lights. Inside James’ work place, there’s a bleak impersonality to everything around him. Characters are framed against quasi-symmetrical backdrops, often with vertical lines and barriers like thin doorways or bland posters hanging between them, implying a forced distance between people as demanded by institutions that value impersonal control. Interestingly though, these barriers are almost never centred just right. Mulligan seems to subtly emphasize the “quasi” in “quasi-symmetrical” when it comes to his compositions. In these slightly off-kilter visuals, the movie at first appears to be displaying a clear narrative about control, and then appears, upon closer inspection, to subtly resist it. Even as we see overhead shots outside the office building, where we follow the Liffey past rows of impersonal, rectangular buildings, the staid sameness of these buildings actually serves to emphasize the subtle curvature of the river, which resists that sameness. It’s almost as if there is something inherently chaotic here that upsets this narrative of impersonality and control.

These visuals work well to elucidate the film’s themes. As the events of the film progress and James begins to viscerally encounter and resist the injustice of his employer, such visuals remain the most powerful weapon in Mulligan’s arsenal to make his examination of the limits of cold calculation and, eventually, the seeming impossibility of clear narratives of control and justice strike home. I’ll be thrilled to see when Mulligan’s keen visual eye gets married to a script and characters that complement this skill.

Sean O’Rourke

92 minutes
15A (see IFCO for details)
The Limit of is released 5th April 2019

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The Loopline Collection

 

The Irish Film Institute has unveiled the first volume of The Loopline Collection, showcasing materials from Loopline Film, one of Ireland’s most influential production companies. Founded in 1992 by filmmaker Sé Merry Doyle, this pioneering company specialised in documentary and TV series, producing a number of hugely important films including significant portraits of prominent cultural figures and work highlighting pressing social issues. Among the material is previously unreleased footage of U2 playing live on Sheriff Street in 1982.

The material is accompanied online by never-before-seen outtakes, interviews and additional material, giving unparalleled access not only to the subjects themselves, but to Merry Doyle’s immersive, detailed and committed filmmaking approach.

This first volume of the collection documents fascinating moments in recent Irish social history: most timely is Liam McGrath’s Essie’s Last Stand, a look at an elderly woman’s fight to stay in her home as developers look to take over her apartment block for redevelopment. Alive Alive O: A Requiem for Dublin features original poetry from Paula Meehan, and examines a time when the livelihoods of Dublin’s iconic street traders were under threat and when drugs became a scourge of the inner city; the film, directed by Merry Doyle, includes footage shot by cinematographer Robbie Ryan, Oscar-nominated this year for his work on The FavouriteLooking On focuses on a vibrant inner city festival in 1982, spearheaded by activist Mick Rafferty and the late politician Tony Gregory, and features the early rooftop appearance by U2.
Other titles to feature as part of the collection include the intimate portrait Patrick Scott: Golden Boy, produced by Andrea Pitt and Maria Doyle Kennedy of Mermaid Films as part of RTÉ Arts Lives, which gives an unparalleled insight into the work of one of Ireland’s foremost abstract painters; the film includes footage shot by Seámus McGarvey, the Oscar-nominated cinematographer of Atonement and Anna KareninaPatrick Kavanagh: No Man’s Fool is a focus on the life of the renowned poet, with contributions from poets John Montague and Macdara Woods, writer Dermot Healy, and singer Jimmy Kelly.

The Imprint series, hosted by Theo Dorgan and first broadcast on RTÉ between 1999 and 2001, features in-depth and revealing interviews with some of the literary world’s most notable figures such as Margaret AtwoodRichard FordGore Vidal, Eavan Boland and Colm Tóibín, while the six-part series The Good Age, originally broadcast in 1997, is an intriguing look at the issues facing older people, with candid personal testimonies about intimacy, self-care and ageism.

The Loopline Collection Volume 1 is available now on the IFI Player.

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Review of Irish Film @ DIFF 2019: Greta

Anthony Kirby gets trapped in Neil Jordan’s latest film, Greta, which screened at this year’s Dublin Film Festival.

After a six year hiatus auteur/director Neil Jordan makes a brilliant return to cinema with this suspenseful gothic chiller.

Boston-born Frances McCullen (Chloë Grace Moretz)  finds a designer handbag on the subway while returning from work as a waitress in a five-star restaurant. She’s anxious to return it and tracks down the owner, Greta Hideg, (Isabelle Huppert). Greta is a French-born piano teacher who lives in a beautiful brownstone apartment and  loves Liszt, especially his haunting Liebestraum . Visiting her for afternoon tea, Frances is troubled by a loud banging which even Greta’s piano virtuosity can’t drown out. “ Oh they’re remodelling the next apartment,” says Greta offhandedly.

Frances is mourning the recent death of her mother and immersing herself in work. Greta still mourns the death of her daughter some years earlier. The younger and older women seem to find succour in each other.

Frances shares a sumptuous apartment with streetwise New York native Erica ( Malika Monroe , Widows).  Erica is cautious about Frances’s new friendship and says so . Then on a subsequent visit while looking for condiments while about to enjoy dinner with Greta, Frances opens a wrong drawer and finds ten bags identical to the designer bag she returned to Greta. Alarmed, she makes a lame excuse and a quick exit. It is then that things take a turn for the worse as Frances realises she has been lured into Greta’s web.

Great actors such as Christopher Plummer in All the Money in the World , Fay Dunaway in  Mommie Dearest  and Glenn Close in Fatal Attraction enjoy the challenge of playing demented characters.  Isabelle Huppert is no exception and relishes giving a no holds barred performance. Kudos again to Jordan for his encouragement. What follows is a masterful tale of obsession and suspense, co-written by Jordan alongside Ray Wright.

It’s hard to say who’s having more fun Hubbert or Jordan . Of course neither have anything to prove at this point in their careers. Seamus McGarvey’s camera work is excellent without being obtrusive especially in the final scenes. The only sad thing about this thriller is that Jordan stalwart Stephen Rea and Irish Canadian Colm Fiore are so underused.

Ultimately the film is a triumph on the part of Jordan and Huppert and certainly a feather in young Chloe Grace Morentz’s cap.  Perhaps like Fatal Attraction  it will become something of a classic.

Greta screened on 2nd March 2019 as part of the Dublin International Film Festival (20th February – 3rd March).

 

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Irish Film Review: Out of Innocence

DIR/WRI: Danny Hiller • PRO: Paul Cummins • DOP: Seamus Deasy • ED: Geraint Huw Reynolds • DES: Ray Ball • MUS: Colm Mac Con Iomaire, Gary Lightbody • CAST: Fiona Shaw, Alun Armstrong, Judith Roddy, Nick Dunning. Fiona Shaw

 

Sometimes a film will require suspension of disbelief because the fiction is too fantastical, but in this case the truth is undoubtedly more bizarre. Out of Innocence focuses on preconceptions, prejudices, and misogyny, as one woman is about to become infamous throughout the nation when both Church and State combine forces to pillory a family in crisis, forcing an elastic band around your diaphragm as you struggle to draw a breath due to the heavy tension.

Written and directed by Danny Hiller, Out of Innocence is the dramatised story of The Kerry Babies Case in 1984, and therefore understandably emotive viewing. The opening images are of a beach so picturesque that it could only be the West of Ireland, as the waves loll in, laden with tranquility. But everything is about to change, as the body of a newborn baby washes up in a fertilizer bag. Such an unnatural event, powerfully juxtaposed against the beauty of the scenery. This kind of incident simply doesn’t happen in these parts of Ireland, and the local Gardaí are flummoxed by the arrival of the Murder Squad from Dublin. Meanwhile, 80 kilometers away, Sarah, our protagonist, is having an affair with a married man, Paudi, a vacillating excuse for a boyfriend or husband. They already have one child as a result of their affair, and unknown to anyone but him, another is on the way. Blood will simmer as the plot evolves into a case of vilification, when Detective Callaghan (Alun Armstrong) goes above and beyond rational measures in order to prove Sarah Flynn guilty, but instead, all he demonstrates is his unfettered misogyny to the audience. Unshakeable in his resolve and distaste for what he deems to be iniquitous women, his face turns acetous at even the suggestion of women and premarital sex. He not only casts a blind eye to blood evidence, but he manufactures the most unlikely versions of a possible truth, as he’s as fond of fabricating theories as Tom Walsh is of tagging furniture.

In contrast to Callaghan’s bullish-ness, we have the meekness of Catherine Flynn, Sarah’s mother. Fiona Shaw was perfectly cast in the role and provides a measured and terse performance. As a god-fearing countrywoman, she lives for religion and family in the wake of her husband’s death, and all that she believes in is crumbling around her shoulders as she struggles to keep a stiff upper lip. Her desire to return to normality is effectively shown as she persists in routinely tucking hot water bottles into absent beds, despite having just confessed to being a conspirator to murder. But the standout performance is Fionnuala Flaherty (Sarah Flynn), who in her tribulation represents all the women of Ireland in an emotional and reflective manner. Hillen captures a moment of genuine poignancy as the camera focuses deliberately on the Harp that presides over the courtroom. Being synonymous with Ireland, due in part to The Society of United Irishmen, the irony here is that the society’s seal depicts a harp with the mottos “It is now strung and shall be heard”, as well as “Equality”, both of which were completely flouted in Sarah Flynn’s case. Recognition must also be given to Colm Mac Con Iomaire’s score, which pensively and effectively encapsulates the beauty and sorrow of this country, as its history is so inextricably entrenched within the duality of these descriptives.

In this age of documentaries about confessions made under police duress, Out of Innocence puts its own harrowing spin on false truths. Women are persecuted from all aspects; from when Sarah was termed to have an “empty womb” (a negative perspective on simply not being pregnant), to the witch hunt for a woman with a child out of wedlock, and god forbid, one that was involved in an affair with a recreant married man, and eventually to evolve into a murder trial without parameters. Yet there are moments of hope, as the trial gathers an indomitable crowd of both female and male supporters, infuriating the prosecuting side, but also unfortunately the judge. As Detective Armstrong combs the strand in the hopes of finding another dead baby at the hands of our protagonist, we realise that although progression has been made, it doesn’t necessarily mean that we are completely through the other side. There is a long road ahead of us yet, one for which the foundations have been laid, but we must also continue to persevere with forging the path. Otherwise there but for the grace of Church and State go we.

Jemma Strain

www.ruledlines.com 

108 minutes

15A 

Out of Innocence is released 12th April 2019

 

 

 

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Key Changes Introduced to Section 481 Including a New Requirement For a Skills Development Plan

The Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht has issued new guidelines on Section 481, the Irish tax incentive for the film, television and animation industry. There are a number of key changes in how to apply for the incentive, together with a new requirement for producers to submit a Skills Development Plan for approval by Fís Éireann/Screen Ireland (Screen Ireland) for all projects with eligible expenditure in excess of €2 million.

Producers will now need to set out the estimated number of employees on set likely to be upskilled in the course of the film and submit a Proposed Skills Development Plan to Screen Ireland, which must be agreed in advance with the agency.

The Production Company is responsible for submitting their approved Skills Development Plan to Screen Ireland. Applications will be reviewed by Screen Ireland and Screen Skills Ireland (SSI) and amendments may be requested to the application, especially where specific skills deficits have been identified by the skills audit and industry engagement.

Applications will also require details on gender equality initiatives, diversity and inclusion initiatives together with a sustainability plan. The production company will be required to furnish a full compliance report in order to receive a final compliance certificate to accompany an application for the final 10% of the Tax Credit.

Applications must be made 20 working days prior to making an application to the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht for certification under Section 481 Taxes Consolidated Act 1997. Applications should be emailed directly to section481@screenireland.ie

Other changes to the incentive are as follows:

  • The Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht will now be administering the incentive, with payments still made by the Revenue
  • The producer company must apply to the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht for a certificate stating that the project is to be treated as a ‘qualifying film’ for the purpose of Section 481
  • This application must be made to the Minister at least 21 working days prior to the commencement of Irish production
  • Where the Minister issues a certificate in relation to a qualifying film and all other provisions of Section 481 are complied with, a producer company may then make a claim for the film corporation tax credit.
  • The system will work on a self-assessment model in which Revenue will no longer issue a certificate indicating the amount of tax credit the production should be entitled to.

Commenting on the changes James Hickey, Chief Executive, Screen Ireland said: “We welcome the new changes to the administration of Section 481. The new skills development requirement linked to the tax credit will provide a strong structured basis for the sector to grow and develop in the coming years, focusing on the skills of the individuals working within the industry. The new skills development requirement is wide-ranging and inclusive, covering skills development across all levels of production, focusing on quality over quantity in terms of the outcomes it delivers.

“We look forward to working with the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, who will now be administering the incentive with the Revenue. We also look forward to the expected publication of guidelines on eligible expenditure and PAYE/Schedule D employees from the Revenue, which will help ensure the incentive works more efficiently.”

For more information visit https://www.screenireland.ie/filming/section-481

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Call For: Expression of Interest: Irish Delegation to BANFF World Media Festival and Vancouver Trade Mission

Fís Éireann/Screen Ireland has partnered with the Canadian Embassy Dublin, Creative BC and CMPA (Vancouver) to bring a delegation of Irish producers to the Banff World Media Festival (9th  12th June 2019) and Vancouver, BC (13th & 14th June 2019) with a particular emphasis on TV Drama.

BANFF WORLD MEDIA FESTIVAL (9th – 12th June)
The Banff World Media Festival (http://www.banffmediafestival.com/) takes place in Banff, Alberta, Canada from 9-12 June 2019.

Screen Ireland will provide support to up to 8 Irish production companies to participate at this networking event. Screen Ireland will cover the cost of accreditation to the festival in Banff and provide subsidy to alleviate the cost of travel and accommodation for the trip. This offer is available to one producer applicant per company, and we can sponsor a maximum of eight companies.

Celebrating its 40th year in 2019, BANFF has grown into a must-attend annual conference attracting over 250 international buyers and a wide-ranging cross-section of television and digital media professionals from around the world, BANFF delivers a comprehensive examination of the most critical issues facing the television and digital media industries through keynotes from industry leaders, contentious panel discussions, pre-booked Face-to-Face Meetings with industry decision-makers, expert forecasts, celebrity Master Classes, networking opportunities, critical case studies, key strategy sessions and more.

The 2019 program and speaker list will be announced soon and updates can be found here

VANCOUVER TRADE MISSION (13th – 14th June)
The eight producers will then travel to Vancouver, BC to attend B2B meetings and networking events. The trade mission will provide producers the opportunity to explore co-production possibilities with Canadian producers though events and meetings organised in collaboration with Creative BC and CMPA.

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA
As places are strictly limited, in applying you are engaging in a competitive process. Screen Ireland will access applications with regard to criteria 1 – 3 below.

  1. An applicant company should have an active slate of TV projects with significant interest from an Irish/international broadcaster or SVOD operators pointing to commercial engagement.
  2. The company should have active relationships with Canadian co-producers and ideally have a track record of at least one official Irish/Canadian Co-Production.
  3. The company representative joining the delegation should be a senior producer, production executive or development executive.

HOW TO APPLY
If you believe you meet the criteria, please email markets@screenireland.ie by Friday 12th April 2019 with your expression of interest. Emails received after this deadline will not be considered.

Please include “Irish Delegation – Canada” in the subject line, along with the following information in the body of your email:

  1. Your company name.
  2. The name of the participant from your company – maximum is 1.
  3. The job title of the participant.
  4. The applicant company should set out its rationale for participating in the Trade Mission and a detailed explanation of why participation in the delegation will be of benefit to your company, addressing in detail each eligibility criteria 1-3 above. Ensure you supply details of any official Irish/Canadian co-productions that you have structured in the past.
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‘Locus of Control’ Released On Amazon Prime

The award winning debut feature film from writer/director Sean Clancy is now available to buy or rent on Amazon Prime. The film is described as a dark comedy about decision and control as a floundering stand-up comedian reluctantly takes a teaching job and struggles to make sense of his slowly unravelling life.

Locus of Control recently finished its festival screenings where it won the Jury Special Recognition Award at the Silk Road International Film Festival 2018. Dublin Sci-Fi Film Festival Director, David Desmond was also impressed by the film and said “Sean Clancy’s outstanding debut feature is a surreal and unnerving mixture of dark comedy and disquieting tension. Featuring top class performances from its main cast, Locus of Control is a fine example of budget filmmaking reaching far beyond its economic strictures.”

The cast includes John Morton, Seamus O’Rourke, Peter McGann and Gus McDonagh with original music composed by Callum Condron.L

Stuck repeating the same pattern of mistakes again and again, Andrew Egan reluctantly accepts a teaching job to support his floundering, stand-up comedy career. As an increasingly anxious Andrew grows accustomed to the droll institution and its occupants he suspects that one of the students may be his downfall and that the previous teacher may not have left of his own accord. His life slowly unravelling, Andrew’s lessons fall on deaf ears and he soon becomes part of a larger cosmic joke.

Link to Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Locus-Control-John-Morton/dp/B07Q5MTS2R


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‘The Man Who Wanted To Fly’ Festival Screening & Nomination

After a fantastic opening weekend at the Irish box-office with further expansion this week, The Man Who Wanted To Fly has been officially selected for Newport Beach Film Festival and also nominated in the Single Documentary category of the Celtic Media Festival.

The largest international cinema event in South California, the 20th Newport Beach Film Festival will take place from April 25th to May 2nd. The Celtic Media Festival, which is held in a different Celtic heartland each year, will be situated in Aviemore in the Scottish Highlands this time round, and will run from June 4th to 6th.


“The reactions we’re getting from audiences are astounding,” said Trisha Canning, producer of The Man Who Wanted To Fly.

“What’s been really pleasing for us is the large cross section of audience with which the film is striking a chord. People of all ages seem to be really enjoying it, with one of the film’s core themes of never giving up on a dream, particularly resonating.”

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Take Part in the European Film Academy’s Young Audience Award

The Galway Film Fleadh and Galway 2020 are looking for young film fans to take part in the European Film Academy (EFA)’s Young Audience Award. The EFA Young Audience Award is a simultaneous, Europe-wide, film viewing event for young people aged between 12 – 14 years. Participation is free.

On Sunday 5th May, three nominated films are screened in 56 different cities, in 35 different European countries. Each participating city has an audience of young people, who act as a jury and vote for their favourite film. And all participating cities interact with each other via video conference and social media.

In between screenings, film educators lead the audience in discussions about the films they’ve seen.

The entire day culminates with the audience transmitting the results of the national vote – a bit like the Eurovision Song Contest.

Being on the jury for the Young Audience Award offers a unique opportunity to discover great films, that don’t normally play in the your local multiplex. It presents films which reflect the realities of young people all over Europe and raises interest in European stories, people, cultures and societies, building bridges to exchange different points of view and increasing awareness of important social issues.

The three nominated films are: Fight Girl, about a headstrong 12 year old named Bo whose parents’ divorce is distracting her from the Dutch national kickboxing championship; Los Bando,a crazy road movie about a young band from Norway who journey across the country to attend the National Championship of Rock in a race against time, the police and their parents; and Old Boys, set in an all-boys boarding school in England, where social misfit Amberson finds himself playing matchmaker for the school hero Winchester, who has a crush on the French teacher’s fiery daughter Agnes. 

To join the Galway jury of the Young Audience Award, you must be aged 12 to 14, be attending school in Galway City or County and have an active interest in films. The EFA Young Audience Award will take place on Sunday May 5that Pálás Galway, from 9:30a.m. – 6p.m.

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Call For: Submissions for Kerry Short Film Bursary

Kerry Short Film Bursary 2019 is now open.


The Film Bursary Award aims to foster talent, creativity and activity in film making in County Kerry. The Bursary is for a short drama film of 10 to 12 minute in duration & is set as a grant and valued at €10,000 for 2019.

Guidelines & applications forms are available on: http://www1.kerrycoco.ie/home3/kerry-film-bursary/ …

Closing date 5pm Tuesday 30th April

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Review: Shazam

Shazam review

DIR: David F. Sandberg • WRI: Henry Gayden • PRO: Peter Safran • DOP: Maxime Alexandre • ED: Michel Aller • DES: Todd Cherniawsky • MUS :Benjamin Wallfisch • CAST: Zachary Levi, Marta Milans, Michelle Borth

After the hard-earned lessons of the Zack Snyder movies, DC have been keeping their films less brooding and a lot lighter; as witnessed in their recent fare, such as the much fiddled with, Justice League and the cheesy “I can’t believe it made over a billion” Aquaman. Not so much cheese is on display with Shazam (formerly known as ‘Captain Marvel’ back in the golden age of comics), whose self-deprecating tone and comedy muscle make it one of the most accessible of the recent wave of films from the DC stable.

Our hero this time round is fourteen-year-old Billy Batson, who finds himself the recipient of magic powers, given to him by the wizard Shazam. When Billy says the wizard’s name he is transformed into an adult version of himself, wearing the requisite spandex and endowed with super powers to equal Superman himself. The wizard has of late been chasing down potential, worthy, pure souls to carry on his mantle and prevent the living incarnations of the seven deadly sins from escaping into the world. Unfortunately the wizard has also inadvertently inspired Dr Thaddeus Sivana, an unsuccessful applicant for the role of hero to go the route of all-out evil and help the seven deadly sins do their thing. In the midst of planning an escape from his latest foster home, Billy becomes the recipient of Shazam’s powers and with the help of his new foster family he must save the day and learn the value of family and other things typical of this type of blockbuster film.

Known for horror films up until now (Lights Out, Annabelle-Creation), director David F. Sandberg leans a little heavy on the horror tropes in the earlier stages. Fortunately things get funnier when Billy starts dealing with his new-found powers with the help of Freddy, one of his fellow foster siblings. The cast are all on top form. Asher Angel as Billy Batson is a nice mix of cocky and fragile and Zachary Levi manages to pull off the adult version of Billy in tights with just the right sense of naivety even if his persona feels a little younger than Billy’s. Mark Strong does bad-guy duties as well as ever in the shape of Dr Sivana – he must have some kind of record at playing villains at this stage.

The mood is distinctly nostalgic. It riffs mightily off Tom Hanks’ Big – Big in spandex if you will, and has a giddy joy in its superpowered hero akin to that of the earlier Superman films. Whilst there is nothing significantly new here in terms of the main thrust of the plot. The charm and sweet nature of the family-oriented scenes and the Billy Batson character’s empowerment will keep the younger members of the audience entranced; he is after all an even more direct embodiment of the hero wish fulfilment for kids – having super powers and trashing super villains. If only real life were as simple.

Paul Farren

131 minutes

12A (see IFCO for details)

Shazam! is released 5th April 2019

Shazam!– Official Website

 

 

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Reel Horror Show: Episode 11

Our possessed podcast posse return after a hiatus in the netherworld. Summoned back to earth, Conor McMahon, Mark Sheridan, Ali Doyle and Conor Dowling cast a darkened eye over the likes of Suspiria, The Hole in the Ground, Halloween, The House that Jack Built, Anna and the Apocalypse, The Guilty, One Cut of the Dead, Overlord, Castle Rock, Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror, He’s Out There and The Monster.

Caution. This podcast may contain thigh-slapping.

Oo welcome, ahhh oo magu welcome to the Reel Horror Show.

 

 

 

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Review: Pet Sematary

Pet Sematary

 

DIR: Kevin Kolsch, Dennis Widmyer • WRI: Matt Greenberg, Jeff Buhler • PRO: Lorenzo di Bonaventura, Steven Schneider, Mark Vahradian • DOP: Laurie Rose • ED: Sarah Broshar • DES: Todd Cherniawsky • CAST: Jason Clarke, Amy Seimetz, Jete Laurence, John Lithgow

Doctor Louis (Clarke), his wife Rachel (Seimetz), and their two children, Ellie (Jete Laurence) and Gage, move from Boston to rural Maine. It doesn’t take long for Ellie to discover the local, paganistic ‘pet sematary’, befriending elderly local Jud (Lithgow) in the process. While Louis finds work at his new practice boring, Rachel is still suffering with memories of a childhood tragedy involving the death of her sister. When Ellie’s beloved cat Churchill gets killed, Jud gets Louis to bury the cat in the strange cemetery, suggesting it may have hitherto unseen powers. Sure enough, Churchill returns from the dead the next day, though there is something quite different about his behaviour.  Louis and Rachel’s’ differing engagements with mortality are pushed considerably further when Ellie dies in a horrific road accident.

This adaptation of Stephen King’s 1983 novel, previously brought to the screen by Mary Lambert in 1989, is a lean, entertaining and effective horror film. Kolsch and Widmyer do a fine job of balancing an absurdist sense of the macabre with resonant and eerie undercurrents and some impressive scenes of body-horror. The film has plenty of cliches and some incredulous moments. It’s never very well established as to why this family would move to a rural area in the first place. Rachel’s’ reaction to seeing to children adorned in Wicker Man-esque masks as they wheelbarrow animal bodies to the ‘sematary’ seems a bit too blasé. The flashbacks to Rachel’s sister’s death are also an occasion where it feels like the film is trying too hard to elicit jumps from the audience. For the most part, however, this is a film that works decidedly well on the terms it sets out.

The directing-duo are helped in no small part by fine performances from the cast. Clarke and Seimetz bring an earthy believability to their performances. Lithgow is superb, seeming alternately sympathetic and untrustworthy, wise and foolish. Laurence plays the dual roles of both her character’s normal and un-dead self excellently. The scene that sees her zombie-self, processing, as she talks to her father, that she is in fact dead, is terrifically eerie and nuanced. For a film with its fair share of jump scares, what stands out most about the film is an insidious sense of dread at our own mortality and an unmistakable streak of humour surrounding the very same thing.

David Prendeville

100 minutes

16 (see IFCO for details)

Pet Sematary is released 5th April 2019

 

Pet Sematary– Official Website

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VllcgXSIJkE

 

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Registration Open for the Irish Pavilion at Cannes Film Festival 2019

Screen Ireland has announced that registration for the Irish Pavilion at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival is now open.

The Irish Pavilion is located at No. 131, in the International Village.


Register online here.

Online registration will close on Thursday 18 April 2019 at 5 pm.


Screening or Selling at Cannes?
If you have a Screen Ireland-supported film or co-production screening or selling in the market, please let the Screen Ireland know so that they can list the details in their marketing materials. You can inform us of films screening and/or selling by filling out the online form.

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Moe Dunford to receive Breakthrough Artist Award at Newport Beach Film Festival

The 20th annual Newport Beach Film Festival will present the largest celebration of Irish Cinema in North America during its eight-day run (April 25 – May 2, 2019) in Southern California. Highlights include an Irish Showcase event, red carpet premieres, Breakthrough Artist Award presentation to Moe Dunford, eleven Irish feature length films, twenty Irish short films, the participation of Irish filmmakers and talent.

On Saturday, April 27th, the Festival will honour Irish Actor Moe Dunford with the Breakthrough Artist Award at the 2019 Festival Honors reception co-hosted by Variety Magazine at the Balboa Bay Resort. Dunford, who stars in three of the Festival’s Irish films (Metal Heart, Rosie, The Dig) and is best known for Vikings, Patrick’s Day and Michael Inside (a 2018 NBFF official selection), has emerged as one of Ireland’s most talented and versatile actors with a robust slate of films in the works, on the festival circuit and in theatrical release. On Sunday, April 28th, 2019, the Festival will present its Irish Showcase, an evening celebration of Celtic cinema and culture. The event will feature the premiere of the three highly anticipated Irish films, Metal Heart, The Belly of the Whale and Rosie followed by a festive post-screening reception. 

Other Irish feature length narrative films screening at the Newport Beach Film Festival include the international premiere of acclaimed Irish director Alexandra McGuinness’ film, She’s Missingas well as John Butler’s, Papi Chulo and Carmel Winters’ Float Like A Butterfly (US Premiere). The Irish animated feature Captain Morten and the Spider Queen (US Premiere) will screen in the Festival’s Family Film Series. The Irish short film Breastfriends will screen as part of the Festival’s Growing Up Shortly program. Irish feature length documentary films in the line-up include Loopers: The Caddie’s Long Walk and The Man Who Wanted to Fly (US Premiere). Two Irish feature length documentaries An Engineer Imagines (US Premiere), Citizen Lane (US Premiere) and the short Irish documentary Bordalo II: A Life of Waste will screen as part of the Festival’s Art, Architecture + Design Film Series. 

For further information see: www.NewportBeachFilmFest.com

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‘Taking Stock’ Screens at Newport Beach Festival


WAward winning film Taking Stock, will have its US premiere at the prestige’s Newport Beach Festival . This Irish drama short film was written and directed by Siobhán McMahon and produced by Galway native Emma Owen from Galway based production company Babyjane Productions. 

This ambitious project was funded by Kildare Short Grass Films; an initiative of Kildare County Councilheaded by Lucina Russell Arts Officer. Lucina brings together both professional and aspiring film makers in Kildare to create a film cultural legacy that will hopefully continue for many years to come.

Starring Kelly Gough, Michael O’Kelly and Rachel Lynch, the film tells the story of a farmer who battles through the aftermath of a cattle raid. It explores the affect this has on him and his family and how one copes in tough circumstances.

This story is not unique to Ireland. It happens all around the world. Thieves never think of the consequences their actions have on the farmer and their families. 

The project has been challenging and an absolute pleasure collaborating with all the cast and crew involved. There has been huge enthusiasm from all, which shows the necessity for schemes like Short Grass Films to continue.

‘We couldn’t have done it without the support of all the cast, crew and the locals – they are the ones who deserve all the credit’ says Emma Owen from Babyjane Productions. ‘The significant grant-aid awarded from Kildare County Council was further enhanced by sponsorship fromCreans Restaurant Killculllen, Ashover Lodge Killcullen, Cine Electric Ardmore Studios and Element Post Production. We owe them our sincerest gratitude’. 

‘We also want to thank our relentless crew who worked tirelessly throughout the project. We were extremely lucky to have IFTA winning Burschi Wojnar, award winning sound designer Paul Rowland and two-time Emmy nominated composer Joseph Conlan on our team’. 

We are excited to see how the film performs on the festival circuit both nationally and internationally. It’s a story that will resonate with all audiences throughout the world as it’s a real human story. 

Siobhán McMahon, director & writer, commented that ‘It was a privilege to work with such an amazing cast and crew on Taking Stock and I am thrilled to be launching the film onto the festival circuit’.

Producer Emma Owen commented ‘We are excited to take the next step with Taking Stock. Siobhan’s stunning directorial is a beautiful, poignant and a searingly honest portrayal of marriage and human emotions in a difficult time. ‘

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Foyle Film Festival’s Light In Motion Competition Open for Entries

Northern Ireland’s only Oscar® affiliated film festival has launched its 2019 Light In Motion (LIM) competition, open to filmmakers and animators across the world. Based in Derry~Londonderry, the Foyle Film Festival competition will remain open for entries until September 23, 2019.

The three competition categories under Light In Motion 2019 are:

·       Best Irish Short

·       Best International Short

·       Best Animation

The category winners will be announced at the closing evening Light in Motion Awards Ceremony, sponsored by City of Derry Crystal, on Sunday 24 November 2019.

Recipients of the LIM Awards qualify for consideration in the Short Film category of the Academy Awards® without needing the standard theatrical run. Foyle Film Festival is also an IMDb Qualifying Festival, granting all eligible film submissions a fast-tracked title page on IMDb.com.

Previous festival winners and competitors who have proceeded to win the Oscar® include: Terry George for The Shore (2012), Martin McDonagh for Six Shooter (2006), Andrea Arnold for Wasp (2004), Adam Elliot for Harvie Krumpet (2003), and Eric Armstrong for Chubbchubbs (2002).

The success continues with 2018 Oscar® nominations for LIM Award finalist The Silent Child directed by Chris Overton and 2018 BAFTA award in Short Animation for LIM Award finalist Poles Apart directed by Paloma Baeza and Ser En Low.

Funded by the Department for Communities through Northern Ireland Screen, by Derry City and Strabane District Council and Tourism NI, Foyle Film Festival delivers a comprehensive programme of documentaries, short films and feature films from all over the world.

Now in its 32nd year, it continues to be a platform for filmmakers, animators and artists to screen their films, network with industry professionals and gain access to the international market.

For more information on how to enter visit www.foylefilmfestival.org.

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Japanese Film Festival

The Japanese Film Festival returns for its 11th outing this April, with a packed programme that will bring the best of Japanese cinema to screens across Ireland.

This year the schedule includes 46 screenings of 16 feature films across Dublin, Galway, Tipperary, Cork, Limerick, Sligo, Waterford and Dundalk.

The festival kicks off this year on the weekend of Saturday April 6th and Sunday April 7th with screenings in Dublin and Galway, and will continue until Saturday April 20th with the final screenings in Dundalk and Waterford.

This year’s programme includes the brilliant yakuza thriller The Blood of Wolves, which recently picked up four Japan Academy Prizes. Born Bone Born is a crowd-pleasing family drama focused around the Okinawan custom of senkotsu (bone washing ceremony). Jesus is a true original from first-time director Hiroshi Okuyama, focusing on one lonely boy’s experiences when a miniature, dancing Jesus Christ shows up unexpectedly. Quirky rom-com Tremble All You Want boasts an extraordinary central performance from Mayu Matsuoka. Meanwhile, acclaimed director Shinya Tsukamoto (best-known for the Tetsuo series) returns with his latest film – the brutal but thoughtful samurai thriller Killing. Elsewhere, The Chrysanthemum and the Guillotineis an epic and intelligent drama in which the worlds of female sumo wrestling and anarchist violence collide.

The festival will host extra cinema screenings of the smash hit zombie comedy One Cut of the Dead plus an opportunity to discover a neglected one with the outrageous 1980s musical gem The Legend of the Stardust Brothers.

This year’s anime selection includes Irish premieres of two new films. The charming Penguin Highway marks the first full-length feature from Studio Colorido, and is a delight for all ages. Elsewhere, there will be few dry eyes in the cinema during the moving romantic drama I Want to Eat Your Pancreas.

Ticket sales information for screenings are available from each participating venue.

Ticketing links and listings are also available at www.jff.ie


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JFF 2019 Screening Schedule:
Dublin – Chester Beatty Library: Saturday April 6th
Galway – Eye Cinema: Sunday April 7th to Thursday April 11th
Tipperary – LIT Clonmel: Monday April 8th
Limerick – University of Limerick: Tuesday April 9th
Cork – Cork Institute of Technology:  Wednesday April 10th
Sligo – The Model Sligo: Wednesday April 10th
Cork – Gate Cinema: Thursday April 11th to Saturday April 13th
Dublin – Light House Cinema: Thursday April 11th to Sunday April 14th
Galway – Pálás: Friday April 12th to Monday April 15th
Tipperary – Tipperary Excel: Saturday April 13th to Sunday April 14th
Cork – Triskel Christchurch: Sunday April 14th to Thursday April 18th
Waterford – Garter Lane Arts Centre: Thursday April 18th to Saturday April 20th
Dundalk – An Táin Arts Centre: Saturday April 20th  

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Anti film Piracy Ad ‘The Movie Thieves’

The Movie Thieves

The Movie Thieves is a 40-second advert about film piracy. Its message is presented in the form of a heist sequence where a gang of professional thieves break into a cinema to steal a rare film print. Directed by Irish filmmaker Gerard Lough, the ad’s anti piracy message was one he felt passionate about as not only was his first feature film Night People illegally uploaded online, he sees it as a still viable threat to cinemas and the industry as a whole. As the narrator (played by Michael Parle) in the ad says, “What seems like a harmless vice would close down every cinema tomorrow if everyone did it.”

Lough: “Its too idealistic to expect a commercial to change people’s minds but hopefully this one will seed the idea that if you truly love movies then you should resist a dodgy download that will hurt the very people who make and exhibit them.”

The ad also served as an opportunity for Lough to work with up and coming actors Aidan O’Sullivan, Bobby Calloway and Kaireht Yovera who will also be in his next feature film, a thriller called Spears. The location used was Century Cinemas in Letterkenny, Co Donegal. The ad is now online and will be shown at selected cinemas across the country. 


Anti piracy organization The Federation Against Copyright Theft,  say that, “Making quality films and TV programmes is an expensive business and it is vitally important that people pay for the legitimate product. Accessing illegal content, whether it’s free or for payment, means that the very heart of the film and TV industries is at risk. Future films will not get made leading to a very rapid downward spiral of a lack of content for film and TV fans, job losses, damage to the local and wider economy, and an increase in criminal activity.This is not scaremongering – it’s a fact.”

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Irish Box Office Smash Hit ‘Black 47’ Launches on Netflix


The Irish box-office smash hit Black 47 directed by Lance Daly is available to view on Netflix from Sunday 31st March.

Set during the Great Irish Famine the film stars Hugo Weaving (Hacksaw Ridge, The Lord of the Rings, The Matrix), Jim Broadbent (Oscar®winner for Iris) and the prolific Irish screen and stage actor Stephen Rea (The Crying Game, Michael Collins).  Joining them are rising international actors James Frecheville (Animal Kingdom, The Drop) and Freddie Fox (King Arthur: Legend of the Sword) along with a strong young Irish cast including Barry Keoghan (Dunkirk, The Killing of a Sacred Deer), Moe Dunford (Michael Inside, Patrick’s Day) and Sarah Greene (Rosie, Noble).

It’s 1847 and Ireland is in the grip of the Great Famine that has ravaged the country for two long years. Feeney, a hardened Irish Ranger who has been fighting for the British Army abroad, abandons his post to return home and reunite with his family.  He’s seen more than his share of horrors, but nothing prepares him for the famine’s hopeless destruction of his homeland that has brutalised his people and where there seems to be no law and order. He discovers his mother starved to death and his brother hanged by the brutal hand of the English. With little else to live for, he sets a destructive path to avenge his family.

The screenplay was written by PJ Dillon (Rewind), Pierce Ryan (Standby), Eugene O’Brien (Eden) and Lance Daly (Life’s a Breeze, Kisses).  Produced by Macdara Kelleher for Fastnet Films with Tim O’Hair, Arcadiy Golubovich and Jonathan Loughran, Black 47 was financed by Primemeridian Entertainment, the Irish Film Board, the Luxembourg Film Fund, Wildcard Distribution, Altitude, BAI, TV3, Eurimages, Umedia, Samsa Films and Fastnet Films.

Watch the Trailer here

https://www.black47film.com
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Submissions & Funding Deadlines

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Looking for funding for your film? Want to submit your work to festivals? Keep an eye on upcoming deadlines here.

If you have a deadline you’d like us to include, please contact filmireland@gmail.com

Click on the link for further information:

TV Drama Production Funding 13th December 2019

Project Development Loans 13th December 2019

Documentary Development  13th December 2019

Screenplay Development  13th December 2019

Fiction: Irish Production 13th December 2019

TV Drama Development  31st October 2019

Project Development Loans 31st October 2019

Documentary Development  31st October 2019

Screenplay Development  31st October 2019

Eurimages Co-production Deadlines 22nd October 2019

TV Drama Production Funding 18th October 2019

Fiction: Irish Production 18th October 2019

NFF+HBF Co-production scheme 9th October 2019

Script + Project Development: Voices 1st September 2019

Project Development Loans 30th August 2019

Documentary Development  30th August 2019

Screenplay Development  30th August 2019

Eurimages Co-production Deadlines 22nd August 2019

TV Drama Production Funding 16th August 2019

Fiction: Irish Production  16th August 2019

Authored Works Funding Scheme 15th August 2019

Script + Project Development: Bright Future 1st August 2019

TV Drama Development  28th June 2019 

Project Development Loans 28th June 2019 

Documentary Development  28th June 2019

Screenplay Development  28th June 2019

TV Drama Production Funding 14th June 2019

Fiction: Irish Production 14th June 2019

TFL World Co-Production Fund 12th June

IBF Project Development  10th June 2019

IBF Production & Post Production  10th June  

Selective Distribution 7th June 2019

Cinema Distribution Selective Scheme  4th June 2019

TFL Audience Design Fund 3rd June

Television Programming 28th May 2019

Kerry Short Film Bursary 30th April

Screen Leaders 19th April 2019

Reel Art Funding Scheme 9th May 2019

Support To Film Festivals  7th May 2019

WRAP Development Support 30th April 2019

Project Development Loans 30th April 2019

Documentary Development  30th April 2019

Screenplay Development   30th April 2019

Creative Europe MEDIA Single Project Development 24th April 2019

Screen Leaders 19th April 2019

TV Drama Production Funding 16th April 2019

Fiction: Irish Production 16th April 2019

Irish Delegation to BANFF World Media Festival and Vancouver Trade Mission 12th April 2019

Promotion of European Works Online 5th April 2019

True North Shorts  3rd April 2019

IDFA Bertha Fund 1st April 2019

Shot by the Sea Submissions 31st March 2019

Young Irish Film Makers Screenwriting competition 31st March 2019

FilmOffaly Short Film Award  22nd March 2019

Newport Beach Film Festival Submissions 21st March 2019

Harp Media Student Short Film and Screenplay Competition 15th March 2019

Northern Ireland Screen’s Feature Documentary Development Funding 15th March 2019

Arts Grant Funding 14th March 2019

EFP Producers on the Move 2019 12 March 2019

Doc Fest Ireland Film Submissions 9th March 2019

Film Education 7th March 2019

Project Development Loans 28th February 2019 

TV Drama Development  28th February 2019

TV Drama Production Funding 28th February 2019

Documentary Development  28th February 2019

Screenplay Development  28th February 2019

Pitch Pilot Workshop Galway 22nd February 2019

Slate Funding Development  20th February 2019

WFT Members’ Short Film Showcase Submissions 20th February 2019

St. Patrick’s Film Festival London Short Film Submission – 15th February 2019

Fiction: Irish Production 15th February 2019

Access to Markets  7th February 2019

Beara Film Fest    31st January 2019

Arts Council Film bursary award  31st January 2019

First Cut! Youth Film Festival 14th January

Submissions for Writers Conference 11th January

SDGI Arri Alexa Take 11th January 2019

Galway Film Fleadh Feature Film Submissions 18th January 2019

Irish Film Festa Short Film Submissions 10th January 2019

Artist Residencies and Bursaries  @ Centre Culturel Irlandais 10th January 2019

Cinema Distribution Selective Scheme  8th January 

Newport Beach Film Festival 21st December 2018

Junior Entertainment Talent Slate 20th December 2018

Support To Film Festivals  20th December 2018 

Television Programming 18th December 2018 

Creative Europe MEDIA Single Project Development 18th December 2018

Irish Animation Awards Submissions 10th December 2018

Dingle International Film Festival  Submissions – 3rd December 2018

Dublin Smartphone Film Festival Submissions – 1st December 2018

Cartoon Movie 21st November 2018

BAI Sound & Vision Round 3 TV & Radio – 8th November 2018

BAI Sponsorship Scheme 2019 29th November

Shebeen Flick Submissions Late Deadline – 1st October 2018

Celtic Media Festival Submissions – 31st October 2018

Dingle International Film Festival  Físín Submissions  – 26th October

Festivals Investment Scheme – 25th October 2018

Celtic International Fund – 24th October 2018

Reel Art and Authored Works  –11 October 2018

BAI Archiving Funding Scheme  –4th October 2018

Shebeen Flick Submissions – 1st October 2018

International Co-Production Development Fund – 30th September 2018

BAI Canada-Ireland Co-development Incentive  – 28th September 2018

IMRO | RTÉ Scoring For Film Programme 28th September 2018

EWA Network Scriptwriter’s Residency 24th September

RTÉ | BAI Round 32  21st September 2018

Irish Screen America New York  Submissions Extended Deadline 14th September 2018

Irish Film Festival London Submissions 14th September 2018

Dublin Port Short Film Prize 13th September 2018

Annual Directors’ Finders Series Showcase 7th September 2018

Cinemagic Young Filmmaker 31st August 2018

Waterford Film Festival Late Deadline 31st August

Richard Harris International Film Festival Submissions Late Deadline 18th August 2018

Screen Ireland Film Project Award – 16th July 2018

Wexford Stories Short Film Funding 31st July 2018

ADIFF  Submissions 31st July 2018

Richard Harris International Film Festival Submissions 31st July 2018

Wicklow Screendance Laboratory 27th July 2018

Waterford Film Festival Short Films & Short Scripts 27th July 2018

Writing Mentorship Scheme 23rd July 2018

Film Mayo Creative Ireland Residency Award 18th July 2018

Underground Cinema Film Festival Submissions 14th July  2018

Spook Screen Submissions 30th June 2018

ilDÁNA Documentary Funding 21st June

IFI Documentary Festival Submissions 20th June 2018

Pitching Competition Galway Film Fleadh 8th June 2018

Galway Film Fair Marketplace 1st June 2018

Irish Film Board Production Funding 31st May 2018 

TV Programming Support Scheme 24th May 2018

Galway Film Fleadh Short Film Submissions 12th May 2018

Cork Film Festival  Feature Film Submissions 4th May 2018

Film Bursary Award 2018 27th April 2018

dlr First Frames Scheme Short Film Funding 27th April 2018

Arts and Disability Connect Funding Scheme 26th April 2018

Light Moves Festival of Screendance Submissions 20th April 2018

Support for Development of Audiovisual Content – Single Project 2018 19th April 2018

Screen Training Ireland Screen Leaders 13th April 2018

POV Training Scheme for female writers & directors  13th April 2018

Northern Ireland Screen’s Feature Doc Development 6th April 2018

Film In Cork 2018 Short Film Award Submissions 6th April 2018

OFFline Film Festival Animation Residency 30th March 2018

Artist in the community scheme Arts Council Funding 26th March

Film Offaly & Filmbase 2018 Short Film Award  23rd March 2018

EFP Producers on the Move 22nd March 2018

SHORT STORIES IFB Funding 23rd March 2018

Student Media Production Awards Funding 20th March 2018

Youth Music Video Competition 28th February 2018

IFB New Writing Development 28th February 2018

First Cut! Youth Film Festival Short Film Submissions 28th February 2018

IFTA Film & Drama Awards 15th February 2018

Arts Council Film Project Award  15th February 2018

Galway Film Centre & RTÉ Short Film Commission Scheme 14th February 2018

Hope: 1998 All Ireland Referendum Funding 9th February 2018

Creative Europe Slate Funding – Support for Development of Audiovisual Content 6th February 2018

Frameworks Scheme – 2nd February 2018

Irish Film Board Screenplay Development 31st January 2018

 Irelands Young Filmmaker of the Year 2018  26th January

Arts Council Film Bursary Award  25th January 2018

Bursary Information Day for Documentary Filmmakers 18th January 2018

Irish Film Festa Submissions 10th January 2018

BAI Sponsorship Scheme 4th January 2018 

Storyland Submissions 15th December 2017

Junior Entertainment Talent Slate 14th December 2017

IMRO Music for Screen Seminar 6th Dec 2017 

Dublin Smartphone Film Festival 1st December 2017

Sound and Vision 1st December 2017

BAI Sound & Vision Scheme Round 30 1st December 2017

Irish Film Festival, Boston 30th November, 2017

RTÉ ECommissioning – Irish Scripted Comedy 29th November 2017

Support for Development of Audiovisual Content – Single Project 2018 23th November 2017 

ilDÁNA 20th October 2017

IFTA Awards 2018 Submissions Deadline for Film & Drama 17th November 2017

TV Programming Support Scheme 16th November 2017

Reel Art 13th October 2017

Cine4 Development Scheme 6th October

Shebeen Flick 1st October 

Audi Dublin International Film Festival 1st October 2017

Irish Filmmaker Competition 27th August 2017

Foyle Film Festival 29th September 2017

TV3 Spring 2018 31st July 2017

Cork Film Festival  15th July 2017

Kerry Film Festival  14th July 2017

The One Minute Film Festival 30th June 2017

Light Moves Symposium 30th June 2017

Cine4 Development Scheme 22nd June 2017

Wexford Documentary Film Festival 19th June 2017

Galway Film Fleadh Pitching Competition 7th June 2017

Close Up – Filmbase Talent Development Scheme 5th June 2017

Jameson First Shot 1st June 2017

Film 48 Hour Challenge 31st May 2017

TV Programming Scheme 30th May 2017

Guth Gafa International Documentary Film Festival 29th May 2017

GAZE International LGBT Film Festival 12th  May 2017

Still Voices Short Film Festival 14th May 2017

Arts and Disability Connect 4th May 2017

TV3 Single Documentary Call Out 2017 31st April 2017

TV3 Autumn 2017 30th April 2017

dlr First Frames Scheme 28th April 2017

Support for Film Festivals 27th April 2017

Support for Content Development of a Single Project  20th April 2017

Science on Screen 19th April 2017

Galway Film Fleadh 31st March 2017

TV3 Studio Call Out 2017 22nd March 2017

The Short Film Festival of Ireland 17th March 2017

Sci-Fi Film Festival 15th March 2017

ilDÁNA 10th March 2017

Frameworks Short Film Scheme 10th March 2017

Support for Film Education 2nd March 2017

Arts Council Film Project Award 2nd March 2017

First Cut! Youth Film Festival  28th February 

Young Animator Of The Year Awards 28th February 2017

RTÉ Factual 20th February 20 17

SHORT SHOTS Filmbase/RTÉ Short Film Scheme 16th February 2017

Fastnet Film Festival 14th February 2017

Support for Development – Slate Funding  2nd February 2017

Short Film Commission Scheme 31st January 2017

Close Up – Development Scheme for Actors 26th January 2017

RTÉ Young Peoples Animated Shorts Scheme 18th January 2017

Factual Entertainment Series for RTÉ2 16th January 2017

Eurimages Co-production  12th January 2017

RTÉ  Comedy, Talent Development and Music proposals 5th January 2017

Irish Film Festa (short films) 20th December 2016

Film In Cork – Short Script Award 9th December 2016

Distribution – Selective Scheme  1st December 2016

Chicago Irish Film Festival 1st December 2016

Irish Film Board Development  30th November 2016

Irish Film Board Distribution 30th November 2016

Support for Film Festivals 24th November 2016 

TV Programming Scheme 24th November 2016 

Irish Film Festival London 23 – 27 November 2016

Support for Content Development of a Single Project – 17th November 2016

Irish Film Board Development 31st October 2016

Irish Film Board  Production & Distribution 28th October 2016

Audi Dublin International Film Festival  1st October 2016

IFB Production and Distribution Funding  30th September 2016

Canada-Ireland Co-development Incentive 28th September 2016

Northern Ireland Screen Short Film Funding 23rd September 2016

Radharc Awards 2016 23rd September 2016

Clones Film Festival Short Film Submissions 31st August 2016

Submissions for 10th Waterford Film Festival 26th August 2016

IFTA Gala Television Awards 22nd August 2016

IFB Focus Shorts  5th August 2016

IFB Real Shorts  5th August 2016

Underground Cinema Film Festival 31st July 2016

Cinemagic Belfast 25th July, 2016

Waterford Film Festival 15th July 2016

IFB Short Stories 15th July 2016

Kerry Film Festival 11th July 2016

Audi Dublin International Film Festival 11th July 2016

Galway Film Fleadh Pitching Competition 9th July 2016

Cork Film Festival 2nd July 2016

Fingal Film Festival 30th June 2016

IFI Documentary Festival 20th  June 2016

Galway Film Fleadh  The One Minute Film Festival June 23rd 2016 

IFB Production and Distribution Funding 17th June 2016

Distribution Selective Scheme 14th June 2016

Kerry Film Festival Short Film Submission 11th July 2016

Film on the Edge 10th June 2016

Galway Film Fleadh Pitching Competition 9th June 2016

Galway Film Fleadh 2016 Marketplace Applications 27th May 2016 

Light Moves 27th May 2016

Television Programming   26th May 2016  

Guth Gafa International Documentary Film Festival 15th May

Directors’ Finders Series Showcase 29th April 2016

Support for Film Festivals   28th April 2016

Single Project Development  21st April 2016

Eurimages Co-Production 15th April, 2016

Pitching Forum for Co-Production Projects April 15th 2016

March on Film 31st March, 2016

Feel Good Lost Filmmakers Competition  29th February 2016

Galway Film Fleadh  Feature Films 25th March 2016

Northern Ireland Screen’s Irish Language Broadcast Fund 18th March 2016

Frameworks 11th March 2016

Limerick Film Festival  4th March 2016

FilmOffaly Award 4th March 2016

Co-Production Funds 25 February 2016

IFB Production and Distribution Funding 19th February 2016

Jameson Gone in 60 Seconds 14th February 2016

Fastnet Film Festival 14th February 2016

March On Film 14th February 2016

First Cut! Youth Film Festival 12th February

Slate Funding 4th February 2016

Live Life National Film Competition 1st February

ASSET programme 30th January 2016

Short Shots @ Filmbase 28th January 2016

Access to Markets   28th January 2016

National Youth Media Awards 22nd January 2016

Fresh Film Festival 22nd January 2016

Arts Council Bursary Awards 21st January 2016

Young Directors Awards 2016 15th January 2016

Artists in Residence @ Centre Culturel Irlandais 11th January 2016

Jameson First Shot Film Competition 4th January 

Irish Film Festa (short film) 20th December

Belfast Film Festival Short Film Competition 18th December

Animation Dingle  December 4th 2015

Dingle International Film Festival 11th December 2015

Dublin Doc Fest 11th December 2015

EU Commission TV Programming Funding 3rd December, 2015 / May 26, 2016

Chicago Irish Film Festival 1st December 2015

Clermont-Ferrand International Short Film Festival 20th November 2015

EU Commission Single Project Development Funding 19th November 2015 / 21st April 2016

Splanc! Irish language Arts Documentary Scheme 16th November 2015

Boston Irish Film Festival 15th November 2015

Feature Documentary Development 6th November 2015

Animation Dingle Early Deadline 6th November 2015

Dublin International Film Festival Short Film Submissions  31st October 2015

Junior Galway Film Fleadh Story Pitching Competition 30th October 2015

Celtic Media Festival  30th October 2015

Short Film Proposal in the Irish Language 19th October 2015

Reel Art  16th October 2015

OFFline Filmmaking Challenge 8 – 10 October 2015

Clones 48 Hour Short Film Challenge 5th October 2015

Ronan Phelan Euroconnection Pitching Award 2015 4 – 11 October 2015

Cinemagic Young Filmmaker Competition 30th September

Capital Irish Film Festival  30th September

Irish Film Festival London  28th September

Feminist Film Festival Short Film Submissions  25th September

Foyle Film Festival 25th September

BBC Writersroom Script Room 24th September

Pitch 25-minute doc for TG4 18th September

Richard Harris International Film Festival  4th September

Clones Film Festival  30th August

Guth Gafa ‘Next Generation’ Short Documentary Student Competition  28th August

Creative Proposals for RTE 26th August

Documentaries for Guth Gafa International Documentary Film Festival 22nd August

Indie Cork 1st August

Irish Screen America  1st August

GAZE International LGBT Film Festival  30th July

Sky Road TV & Film Festival 17th July  [Early Bird]

The One Minute Film Festival  30th June

Fingal Film Festival  30th June

Underground Cinema Film Festival  30th June

IFI Documentary Festival  24th  June

Shortfilm48 12 – 14 June

Light Moves  10th June

Charlie Chaplin Film Festival  1st June

Arts and Disability Connect  21st May

Lady’s First International Film Festival 20th May

Short Films for Galway Film Fleadh 2015  15th May

Frameworks  15th April

FilmOffaly/Filmbase 2015 Short Film Award  20th March

Secrets of Offaly – Public Art Commission  13th February

 AFTER ’16  6th February

Jameson First Shot 2015 1st February

Dublin Doc Fest Short Documentary Film  30th January

Irish Animation Awards  23rd January

Youth Film Festival  9th January

 

 

 

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