‘Trampoline’ Available to Rent Online

trampoline-still-01

Trampoline, a new award Irish independent feature film, is now available to rent at the online movie streaming site SeedandSpark.com

Set and shot in Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, Trampoline is a light-hearted drama which follows a young woman named Angie (Aide Spratt) who returns to Tipperary after finishing college and gets a job teaching at her old secondary school. While home she must reconnect with her family and friends as well as trying to figure out what her next step in life should be.

Written and directed by Tom Ryan who also produced the movie on a budget of less than €1000, Trampoline has been a major success not only in independent cinema but for Irish film also. The coming of age movie has picked up Best Film awards in New York and Canada with lead actor Aide Spratt also taking home a Best Actress award in LA for her work on the film.

The film is now available to rent for only €2.99 on seedandspark.com and the DVD will be released on September 22nd and is available for pre-order now at trampolinemovie.com.

 

Share

Trampoline

trampoline

 

Chris Lavery checks out Tom Ryan’s low-budget debut feature Trampoline, which is set to screen in Cork on Thursday, 12th June 2014 at the Beggarman.

 

Directed by first-time writer-director Tom Ryan, Trampoline follows the story of directionless Angie (Spratt), who returns home to Tipperary from London to reconnect with her family and friends. After securing a teaching job in her local school, taking after her retired teacher mum (Walshe), Angie begins to settle back into life at home. But she soon finds her old life isn’t as easy to readjust to as she first thought.

 

Filmed for less than €1,000, Trampoline started life as a debut feature of modest ambitions, but since its Irish premiere at last October’s IndieCork Film Festival, Trampoline hasn’t gone unnoticed. First, Spratt was the recipient of the award for Best Leading Actress in a Feature Film from the Los Angeles Indie Fest awards in November. Then came recognition from the Williamsburg Independent Film Festival in New York a few weeks later when Trampoline won Best Narrative Feature. This then culminated in a limited theatrical release in Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, the town in which the film is set.

 

Given Ryan’s background as an understudy to Andrij Parekh – cinematographer for films such as Half Nelson and Blue Valentine – and his experience working as a camera trainee on films such as Steve McQueen’s Shame, it’s clear he was paying attention, with Half Nelson particularly being an influence here. What strikes you initially about Trampoline is its visual aesthetic. Together with his director of photography, Cian Moynan, Ryan shows an adept skill at capturing beautiful exterior scenes of Dublin as well as atmospheric settings for Angie’s social life around Nenagh.

 

The juxtaposition of these colourful, vibrant shots together with the relatively mundane interiors of Angie’s home and school life, provides an additional narrative (together with the dialogue) that highlights Angie’s aimless and unsure life ambitions.

 

It could’ve been considered a risk, placing the fortunes of a debut feature film in the hands of a single central character, rather than an ensemble. But with Angie, Ryan has created a completely believable, fully rounded character who, despite her flaws, we are easily able to warm to.

 

But praise for this cannot be shared by Ryan alone. As Angie, Spratt is the heart and soul of Trampoline and delivers a superb performance. Not just in the delivery of dialogue, but also in her unspoken scenes. Most notably, a scene where she watches her absentee musician father play in the local pub is a moving scene of a young woman looking towards her future by reconciling with her past – a triumphant display despite not a single word being spoken.

 

Despite able support from a range of background characters (all local actors), Trampoline belongs to Spratt.

 

As Ryan, and producer Claire Gormley, continue to bring Trampoline to more festivals, some attention is now being turned to the team’s next project – one which will be eagerly anticipated by many given this accomplished debut.

 

Trampoline will be screened upstairs in the Beggarman on Gillabbey Street Cork on Thursday, 12th June at 8pm. Tickets are €5 at the door and includes free popcorn for the event.

Share

‘Trampoline’ Screens at Little Cinema Galway

trampoline-still-01

Trampoline screens tonight at 9PM at the Little Cinema Galway.

Set and shot in Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, Trampoline is a light-hearted drama directed by Tom Ryan, which follows a young woman named Angie (Aoife Spratt) who returns to Tipperary after finishing college and gets a job teaching at her old secondary school. While home she must reconnect with her family and friends as well as trying to figure out what her next step in life should be.

 

Tickets are available for  €5 at http://www.eventbrite.com/myevent?eid=10595783273

Share

‘Trampoline’ Secures Limited Theatrical Release

trampoline-still-01

Trampoline a new Irish independent feature film has secured a limited theatrical release at the Ormond Cineplex Nenagh.

The film which has won Best Feature at the Williamsburg Independent Film Festival in New York and Best Leading Actress at the Indie Fest Awards in LA, will run at the Ormond Cineplex for a week beginning Friday Februrary 21st.

Set and shot in Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, ‘Trampoline’ is a light hearted drama which follows a young woman named Angie (Aoife Spratt) who returns to Tipperary after finishing college and gets a job teaching at her old secondary school. While home she must reconnect with her family and friends as well as trying to figure out what her next step in life should be.

26 year old writer/ director Tom Ryan is thrilled with the news that the film will receive a cinema release in his home town. “Having Trampoline screen at the Ormond means more to me than any film festival. I got my first ever job in that cinema when I was 16, I started off checking tickets and now, ten years later I get to come back with my first feature as a writer – director. It’s an amazing achievement!”

The film was made for a budget of €1000 which was raised by local businesses in Nenagh sponsoring the film. It has already screened in festivals both at home and abroad and has scooped many major awards.

Tickets will be available soon on the Ormond Cineplex website – http://www.ormondcineplex.com/
More information on the film can be found at trampolinemovie.com

Share

‘Trampoline’ Wins Best Feature in NY

Best Feature

 

The independently produced Irish feature film ‘Trampoline has just won the Best Narrative Feature award in New York.

 

The small Irish drama set and shot in Tipperary has been selected as Best Feature at this years Williamsburg Independent Film Festival in Brooklyn NY.

 

Trampoline is a drama about a young woman who returns to her hometown in Tipperary and gets a job teaching at her old school. She soon realizes that she is not cut out to teach and must figure out the next step in her life while struggling to reconnect with her broken family.

 

Written and directed by 26 year old Tipperary native Tom Ryan, the film stars Wexford actor Aoife Spratt in the lead role of Angie who recently won an award for Best Leading Actress at the Indie Fest Film Festival in LA for her performance in Trampoline.

 

The movie was shot with a tiny but dedicated crew on a budget of less than €1000 raised by sponsorship from local businesses in Nenagh in exchange for a shot of their shopfront in the movie and a name-check in the end credits.

 

The film has also screened in Ireland at the Indie Cork Film Festival and the Clones Film Festival earlier this year.

 

 

 

trampolinemovie.com

Share

Aoife Spratt Wins Best Leading Actress in a Feature Film at LA Indie Fest

 

1465370_667762446575355_1627040508_n

Aoife Spratt has won the award for Best Leading Actress in a Feature Film for her role in Trampoline at the Indie Fest awards in LA.

Written and directed by Tom Ryan, Trampoline tells the story of a young woman named Angie, played by Aoife, who returns home after finishing college and gets a job teaching at her old school. While at home she struggles to reconnect her broken family and tries to readjust to the life she left behind and figure out the best way to move forward with her life.

Set and shot in Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, Trampoline was funded by local businesses in the town. The movie was made for less than €1000 and recently premiered at the Indie Cork film festival.

You can read our interview with writer/director Tom Ryan here 

 

Share

Interview: Tom Ryan, director of ‘Trampoline’

trampoline

 

Trampoline, the independent Irish feature about a woman returning home and having to readjust to the life she left behind, had its world premiere at the Indie Cork film festival last week. Glenn Caldecott bounced some ideas around with first-time writer/director Tom Ryan about the film and the challenges of independence. 

 

What inspired you to make Trampoline?

Trampoline was born out of a lifelong desire to be a writer/ director. After finishing college I worked within the film industry as a camera assistant for three years which was a huge learning curve for me. Working on shoots with the camera department meant I was always privy to watching how different directors interact with actors. Late last year I eventually felt confident enough to write a feature script and put it into production. I wrote the script around my production limitations. For example, I knew that it would more cost effective to shoot it in my hometown of Nenagh than it would a big city like Dublin, Cork or Galway. I was drawn to the idea of people my age who feel lost and directionless after finishing college. I have many friends in that position so that was the basis of the script. I really didn’t think that there were any Irish movies that dealt with this kind of idea so that was another reason for me to want to make it.

 

What considerations are there when making an independent film?

Making an independent film is a tough but extremely rewarding process. The only problem is that you don’t get any of the rewards until you have the entire project completed. Being an independent movie means that you have no safety net, no major financial support and absolutely no promise that it will ever be screened. All of this can be quite daunting but it is also an incredible learning experience. You also have to choose your cast and crew carefully, it’s an intense process and you need people that you can count on and who you trust. I was incredibly lucky with my cast and crew. Filmmaking is a collaboration and in order to get through the stress and torture that can sometimes arise from shooting you need a team of people who are all incredibly willing to support each other.

 

Can you talk about how the film was financed? What was the motivation behind getting local Nenagh businesses to sponsor the film?

We were unable to get any official funding of any kind so we decided to ask the local businesses in the town of Nenagh if they would help sponsor the film. In exchange for a donation they would get a mention in the credits and a shot of their shop-front in the movie. It was product placement of sorts but it worked. One of the major advantages of shooting your first film in your hometown is that there is amazing goodwill and support from everybody there so we were extremely fortunate that the local businesses were so kind to us, otherwise we really wouldn’t be where we are today with the movie.

 

How did you work with the DOP to get such a great looking film on a budget? 

My DOP, Cian Moynan, is one of those rare talents in the business. He has such a good eye for visuals and he is very confident when it comes to setting up shots. I found early on in the shoot that the best way to get natural performances from the actors would be to let them have free reign of the room during the scene. This way they would not have to worry about hitting marks or delivering lines certain ways as they turn to hit specific lights on set and things like that, so as a result of this Cian had to throw his shotlist out the window and improv his shots around the actors. That might sound a bit crazy but Cian was more than capable of stepping up to that challenge and he did a fantastic job. It is very important for the director to have a cinematographer that he/she can trust implicitely. We didn’t have the budget for any monitors or equipment like that so I put a lot of trust in Cian to get the right shots and he went above and beyond the call of duty for us.

 

What was the most valuable thing that you learnt while working as a camera assistant that you could apply to making Trampoline?

I have worked on good shoots and bad shoots throughout my years as a camera assistant and the difference between and enjoyable experience and a horrible one is all down to the way the set is run and whether or not there is a mutual respect there for everybody involved. It doesn’t matter if you are the director or the camera assistant, there should be no real hierarchy. Everybody is their to do their job and make sure that things run smoothly so that you can all get the best results for the finished film. Filmmaking is a team effort and every member of that team is essential, that was one of the most important things I learned while working as a camera assist.

 

The film  played last week at the IndieCork Film Festival, what’s the plan for it going forward?

Going forward we are hoping that Trampoline will have a healthy and successful festival life. We are thrilled to bits with the wonderful reactions that it has been getting so far. We would ideally love for it to get picked up by a distributor. We strongly believe that there is an audience for this kind of film in Ireland and we’re eager to get it out to more people. We are being screened as part of the Clones Film Festival on Sunday, 27th October, which is going to be a great experience. We are also in the early stages of development with our second feature so fingers crossed I’ll get all the team back and we can get cracking on the next one soon!

 

Share

‘Trampoline’ World Premiere at IndieCork

Quad Clean

Trampoline, a new and exciting independent Irish feature film, will be getting its world premiere at the inaugural IndieCork film festival on 17th October.

Trampoline tells the story of a young woman named Angie who returns home after finishing college and gets a job teaching at her old school. While at home she struggles to reconnect her broken family and tries to readjust to the life she left behind and figure out the best way to move forward with her life.

Written and directed by Tom Ryan and produced by Claire Gormley, the movie is intended to speak to young people who feel lost in life after finishing college. ‘We hope that everyone who sees this film can relate to it somehow,’ says director Tom Ryan, ‘in particular people in their twenties who don’t know what to do with themselves after finishing college.’
Set and shot in Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, Trampoline was funded by local businesses in the town. The movie was made for less than €1000.

The film stars Aoife Spratt in the lead role of Angie and Audrey Hamilton as her best friend Kate. Trampoline features strong female leading roles and honest relatable characters. The film is highly influenced by American independent cinema. ‘I love American indie movies and I was very eager to transfer that sort of style to Irish film. I’m confident that it will appeal to audiences here who may need a break from all the gritty crime dramas that are being turned out at the moment,’ says Tom.

The film will be screened on Thursday, 17th October at the Gate Cinema in Cork city centre as part of the IndieCork Film Festival. This will be the first year of the festival which was set up by Mick Hannigan and Una Feely and promises to showcase the best in upcoming independent film. ‘IndieCork is the perfect festival for Trampoline to receive its World Premiere,’ says producer Claire Gormley. ‘We are thrilled to be getting such fantastic support and recognition from Mick, Una and all involved in the festival.’

More information on the film can be found at trampolinemovie.com

Share

Post-production underway on ‘Trampoline’

FilmIreland01
Maggie Donovan (left) and Aoife Spratt (right) as Jenny and Angie

 

Post-production is currently underway on the new, upcoming Irish feature film Trampoline.

 
Written and directed by Tom Ryan and produced by Claire Gormley, Trampoline tells the story of Angie, a girl in her early twenties who returns to her home town to become a teacher at her local school while also dealing with the absence of her father from her family.

The film was produced independently and financed by local businesses in Nenagh, Tipperary where it was also shot. Aoife Spratt stars in the lead role as Angie, with support from Audrey Hamilton, Maggie Donovan, Eddie Murphy and Niamh Algar.

Trampoline is a contemporary drama which deals with relevant issues that many people in their mid twenties are forced to deal with after finishing college.

The movie is currently in post-production with the aim of being completed by the end of the summer for festival entries.

follow on facebook- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Trampoline-Movie/501194433232158

Share