The Actors’ Room: Geraldine McAlinden

In this episode of The Actors’ Room, Lynn Larkin chats to Geraldine McAlinden. Originally from County Armagh, Geraldine trained originally as a solicitor and worked in the UK and Ireland.

She trained and worked part-time as an actor and director for theatre until 2012 when she left law to take up a place in the first one year Screen Acting programme run by the Factory now Bow Street Academy. During that time she trained with Kirsten Sheridan, Shimmy Marcus, Lance Daly and Maureen Hughes during the one year Screen Acting Programme in The Factory (now Bow Street) and with the Gaiety School of Acting and the Focus Theatre. She is a member of The Actor’s Studio in Bow Street.

 

Film credits include the features The Secret Scripture, The Truth Commissioner, How to be Happy, ANTON and Portrait of a Zombie (Winner of the 2013 Underground Film Festival’s Best Independent Feature award). Geraldine’s performance in Portrait of a Zombie led to her being long listed for an IFTA for Best Actress in a leading role in a feature film in 2013.

Geraldine’s TV acting credits include the IFTA winning Red Rock and Cumann na mBan 100 as well as Scup and RTE’s children’s show Spooky Stakeout.

Geraldine’s recent theatre credits include One Day by Dick Walsh, Remember to Breathe (Dublin Fringe 2015), Friendly Fire, Mary Stuart, Beyond Therapy!, Philidelphia Here I come!, and various characters in the longplay improv Spoonfed (Dublin Fringe 2005).

Geraldine’s directing credits include the plays Orphans, The New York Monologues and The Cripple of Inishmaan and the short film Helmets and Thorny Island.

Her writing credits include the tiny play Knowing (which was published and produced by  Fishamble’s Tiny Plays for Ireland) and the short films The Crack and Any Given Night (which she co-wrote).

Her film production credits include Enough (selected for screening at the 2015 Corona Fastnet Short Film Festival).

Geraldine is one of the two founding members of Alchemy 8 Productions whose production of Orphans was highlighted as one of the theatre highlights in Dublin for 2015. Geraldine can be seen soon in the new season of Striking Out   on Rte and in the upcoming feature films Zoo, Dark lies the island and Black 47.

Currently she can be seen playing Jennifer in the web-series Fix Me by Tom Moran.

Showreel

http://www.lbmactors.com/members/geraldine-mcalinden/

IMDB
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2697506/?mode=desktop&ref_=m_ft_dsk

Fix Me web series

https://m.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNMthVn48itG8lgGVMh4oBCo4xKgbWqKG

 

Film Ireland Podcasts

Share

The Actors’ Room: Eddie Jackson

eddie-jackson-1

In this episode of The Actors’ Room, Lynn Larkin is joined by Eddie Jackson.

Eddie’s most recent credits include the feature film Red Room, directed by Stephen Gaffney, Game of Thrones (‘Battle of the Bastards’ and ‘Book of the Stranger’), directed by Miguel Sapochnick, Riegn (TV Show) and Ripper Street (TV Show). He is also currently shooting Acceptable Risk, a six-part series.

 

Eddie studied theatre studies at Inchicore College and later completed the Dublin Acting Class with Terry McMahon. His other film and television credits include Vikings (T.V.) J.A.M (Short), Gold (Feature), Justlikeabitch (Short), Dog Eat Dog (Short), Proclaim (Short), Bridge Station (Short), Promised Land (Short), Windows (Short), The Last Frame (Short) and The Light of Day (Feature).

 

Eddie also appeared in the short films A House of Cards and Normal, written and produced with fellow actor Mark McCabe. Both films had successful festival runs with Normal most notably being selected for the Cork Film Festival. Normal won Best Screenplay at The Underground Film Festival and was also nominated for best film, with Eddie also being nominated for best actor.

 

He directed the short Lennon v McCartney, starring Seamus Brennan and Ruaidhri Conroy in 2015, which was based on the play by the same name, written by Stephen Kennedy.

 

eddie-jackson-game-of-thrones-206x300

 

imdb.com

 

 

Eddie Jackson features on an Actor’s Panel hosted by Lynn Larkin at this year’s DubWebFest, joined by Aiobheann McCaul (Fair City), Tony Kelly (The Hurler)  and Karen Healy (Pondering Media). The actors will discuss their experiences, future projects and the changing nature of traditional TV versus online TV.The Actors Panel takes place at Filmbase on Friday, 18th November at 7pm 

href=”http://dublinwebfest.com/festival-programme-2016/” target=”_blank”>dublinwebfest.com/festival-programme-2016/

Share

The Actors’ Room: Maureen O’Connell

img_2754

In this episode of The Actors’ Room, Lynn Larkin is joined by Maureen O’Connell.

Maureen has a Higher National Diploma in Film Production from Ballyfermot College & a BA in Acting from RADA, London.

 

Maureen has over 10 years experience as an actor & filmmaker. She has many theatre and tv credits to her name, most notably, ‘Mary’ in Juno & the Paycock alongside Niamh Cusack, and ‘Oonagh’ in BBC 1’s Father Brown alongside Mark Williams and James Fleet.

 

She has written and directed 3 short films, the most recent of which Proclaim! has just won the Best 1916 Centenary Short Film Award at Fingal Film Festival and Best Script at the Dublin International Short Film & Music Festival.

 

Maureen also teaches Acting at Filmbase.

 

Maureen is currently directing her first feature film.

 

Share

Interview: Stephen McCormack, Co-Founder Mediacon Global TV Summit

mediaconlogonew2

Lynn Larkin talked to Stephen McCormack Co-Founder of Mediacon Global TV Summit ahead of the 2016 MediaCon Global Entertainment Summit, which aims to position Ireland as a creative hub for global content. The Summit runs from 13 – 14 September at City Hall and the Parliament Street area in Dublin.

 
 
This is your second year of Mediacon, what’s the thinking behind having an event like this in Ireland now.

I think the opportunity globally for content is exploding. I was at a talk recently where Shane Smith, co-founder and CEO of media company Vice, said that when millennials get more buying power they’re buying more screens. I would add that when they get the screens they connect, communicate and consume. The consume part of that is all about content. We’ve gone from a situation where there was one screen in the house to now when you have 5 or 6 screens. The sheer explosion of content is a huge opportunity.

Ireland is perfectly positioned to take advantage of this. While we punch above our weight in film and animation we don’t do as well in the business of Television and Digital Entertainment. So I think it’s time to join the dots and become a global creative hub for visual storytelling across all platforms. What we’re doing is bringing the best around the world to listen, talk to and learn from. And then we want to get all the stakeholders from the local industry, such as the Broadcast Authority of Ireland, RTÉ, Enterprise Ireland, Virgin Media, the Irish Film Board  and bring them all together. A bit like what Denmark did when it reinvigorated its drama sector, create a nationwide content strategy and promote home-grown content.

 

This year the event is two days – what can we expect?

This year we’re able to do a lot more extra programming, with workshops, masterclasses and business meetings. To be honest, we could actually do 5 days!

 

You touched earlier on the recent success of Danish drama. What is it you think we can learn from them?

From talking to people involved, the thing that came up time and time again was joined-up thinking –  a way of thinking  in synchronisation with all the people involved in the creative sector. I think it’s fair to say in Ireland we’re not great at doing that. We all tend to work in our own little empires. If you look at other sectors,  like software and tech start-ups, a few years ago they started joined-up thinking and it has worked.

We want to take all the state agencies that are involved in creative storytelling and make them have a joined-up coherent strategy. We want to take all the private companies and bodies involved and have them have joined-up thinking, and people like Enterprise Ireland and IDA have to join up their thinking. If we say we’re going to make this a 3 or 4 billion dollar industry we’re going to have all think about that and apply the same target approach.

We’ve probably pumped in the region of half a billion to a billion a year of financing into content – but we sell very little of it internationally. We’ve got to rethink how this works.

 

For information on this year’s schedule, please visit – http://mediacon.ie/schedule/

 

 

Share

The Actors’ Room: Susan Barrett

IMG_2538

 

In this episode of The Actors’ Room, Lynn Larkin is joined by Susan Barrett.

Susan trained as an actor in Dublin before moving to London to pursue her training further. Returning to Ireland in 2010, she has worked in both theatre and film, featuring in a number of short films, including Engraved (2014), which she also wrote and produced.

In 2015, Susan made her feature debut in The Hit Producer directed by Kevin de la Isla O’Neill.  

 

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on Soundcloud

Subscribe on Stitcher

Subscribe to the Film Ireland RSS feed

 

Share

The Actors’ Room: John Connors

John Connors

 

In this episode of The Actors’ Room, Lynn Larkin is joined by John Connors. John is an actor and writer, whose features include King of the Travellers, Stalker and Monged. John will also feature in Jim Sheridan’s upcoming film, The Secret Scripture, and Mark O’Connor’s Cardboard Gangsters, which he co-wrote with Mark. John’s television work includes Love/Hate, Charlie and Rebellion.

 

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on Soundcloud

Subscribe on Stitcher

Subscribe to the Film Ireland RSS feed

Share

The Actors’ Room: Glenn Keogh

IMG_2299

 

Film Ireland are delighted to be launching The Actors’ Room, a new series of podcasts featuring conversations with actors. To kick off the series, Glenn Keogh dropped in for a chat with Lynn Larkin to give us the insight on working in LA.

Glenn has been living and working in LA for the past 9 years, picking up roles on a number of high-profile TV series, including Castle, Criminal Minds, Undercovers, Days of Our Lives, Ray Donovan, Sons of Anarchy, Once Upon a Time, Scorpion and New Girl. Glenn’s feature film credits include working alongside fellow Irish actor Jack Reynor in Transformers: Age of Extinction.

 

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on Soundcloud

Subscribe on Stitcher

Subscribe to the Film Ireland RSS feed

 

Share

Video: Brooklyn Premiere

brooklyn

Lynn Larkin is on the red carpet at the Savoy Cinema in Dublin for Film Ireland and #FilmMe for the Irish premiere of Brooklyn.

Lynn chats to actor Saoirse Ronan (Eilis), director John Crowley, actor Jenn Murray (Dolores), actor Jane Brennan (Mary Lacey), screenwriter Nick Hornby, novelist Colm Tóibín, and producer Finola Dwyer.

Along the way Lynn partakes in a bit of Bono-spotting.

 

Share

On The Reel Interview Steven O’Riordan, director of ‘No Limbs No Limits’

Steven OD inteview still2

 

Steven O’Riordan dropped into the studio this week to chat to Lynn Larkin for On The Reel, in association with Film Ireland, about his documentary No Limbs No Limits –  a story of hope and triumph over adversity, a story of how human resilience can conquer all by overcoming many obstacles to achieve what others would deem impossible.

No Limbs No Limits is released in Irish cinemas 11th April 2014.

Share

On The Reel At The IFTAs

Faasbender copy

Lynn Larkin (second left) closes in on Fassbender’s IFTA

On the Reel’s Lynn Larkin, in association with Film Ireland, hits the red carpet in her blue guna and and gets in among the celebs at the Irish Film and Television Awards ceremony, which took place at the DoubleTree by Hilton venue in Dublin 4 on Saturday, 5th April 2014.

Check out the video below and get the low-down on the night from Michael Fassbender, Colin Farrell, Liam Cunningham, Will Forte, Mary Murray, Amy Huberman,  Andrew Scott, Fionnula Flanagan, Antonia Campbell-Hughes

 

Share

On The Reel On The Red Carpet – Russell Crowe, star of Noah

Lynn Larkin interviews Russell Crowe © Michael Chester

Michael Chester (www.chester.ie)

Russell Crowe sailed into Dublin this weekend for the Irish premiere screening of his latest film, Noah, at the Savoy cinema.

Lynn Larkin was there for On The Reel in association with Film Ireland to fire him questions 2 by 2.

Check out the video and find out how Russell felt about getting the call to play Noah, working with giraffes and elephants, and realising that Noah is just a bloke.

Noah is released in Irish cinemas on Friday, 4th April.

 

Share

On the Reel at Jameson Cult Film Club screening of ‘Jaws’

photo

 

Check out the latest video from On the Reel in association with Film Ireland. Lynn Larkin hooks up with Hollywood legend Richard Dreyfuss and finally gets to confront him face to face about his responsibility for her fear of swimming in the ocean.

Lynn then finds herself trapped in a cage not knowing what beast will attack. Will she survive this underwater nightmare? Is this Lynn’s last ever On the Reel? Will Gemma be left minus a partner and be forced to do the next red carpet…?

Find out:

On the Reel

 

Share

JDIFF: Irish Film Review – Short Film

Pat-Deery-Atrophy

Lynn Larkin checked in on the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival’s selection of  Irish short films.

Friday the 14th was all SHORT of romantic. Valentine’s day started with a selection of short films at the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival and I was romanced by not one, but eight fantastic Irish short films. Each short film had a wonderful scene of something much bigger than the tiny clip-it we were lucky to catch a glimpse of. They all left me intrigued and longing for more, perhaps a feature film in the making? Playing to a full house in the Light House cinema, filled with a sense of anticipation, the lights dimmed and a soft russell of popcorn munching began. Our Valentine’s treat was a quick romp with comedy and drama filled with a foray of emotion.

 

Breakfast Wine
Director: Ian Fitzgibbon
Writer: Kevin Barry
Running Time: 11 minutes
Starring Ruth Bradley, Dylan Moran and David Pearse. A young woman makes an appearance into a country town pub much to the pleasant surprise of two alcoholics who are solely responsible for keeping the small bar running. Boozing and chatting the night away revels her past is coloured with lifetime of experiences. This short feels like it was taken from a feature film and placed into the line-up. It’s an interesting place to start and finish a short and it definitely makes you wonder what happened next?

Atrophy
Director: Mairtín de Barra
Writer: Matthew Roche
Running Time: 13 minutes
Atrophy examines the sacrifices made in the name of development, and the effect they have upon people. A tale of old versus new, loss, friendship and an old farmer and his dog. I have to admit I had a lump in my throat while watching this film, meaning it was successful in tackling the topic at hand. This little film will pull at your heart strings and make you want to call your granddad more often, which makes things a little difficult for me, considering, they’re both dead.

Rúbaí
Director: Louise Ni Fhiannachta
Writer: Anton Beag Ó Colla
Running Time: 11 minutes
The First Holy Communion is fast approaching but as an atheist, eight-year-old Rúbaí refuses to be a part of it. Rúbaí faces emotional blackmail, religious and philosophical debate and out and out intolerance in today’s supposedly diverse and modern Ireland. Rúbaí is a super funny Irish short that deals with some real drama. Oh to be an eight-year-old atheist fuelled with wit and knowledge and a blunt tongue. I really enjoyed this film. I don’t know what else to say, other then go see this film, you’ll love it.

Morning
Director: Cathy Brady
Writer: Cathy Brady, Sarah Woolner
Running Time: 20 minutes
Mary wakes up on the sofa with a banging headache. Her morning routine is interrupted by a persistent reporter. She is a broken lost soul that has suffered a devastating life tragedy. But this morning is the morning she decides to deal with what has happened. Morning is a truly gripping drama. Brady has managed to give a sneak peek into a world no one would ever wish to experience.

Uisce Beatha
Director: Shaun O’Connor
Writer: Tadhg Hickey
Running Time: 8 minutes
Set in 1912, Uisce Beatha is the true story of Tom, a young man who leaves his home in rural Ireland to cross the ocean on the ill-fated Titanic. But a night of celebration beforehand results in a twist that will affect Tom’s fate drastically. Does everything in life happen for a reason?

The Ledge End of Phil (From Accounting)
Writer-director: Paul Ó Muiris
Running Time: 6 minutes
An animation about a man called Phil who is forced to take a look at the life that he has been ignoring and neglected for so long. With nowhere left to turn he has no choice but to take a giant leap into the unknown. It’s fly or die.

Mechanic
Writer-directors: Tom Sullivan, Feidlim Cannon
Running Time: 15 minutes
A heartfelt story about a mechanic fed up with what life has dealt him but finds consolation and peace in ageing gracefully.

4 Bhanríon
Director: Vittoria Colonna
Writers: Vittoria Colonna, Eoin Rogers
Running Time: 15 minutes
4 Bhanríon (4 Queens) is a black comedy about four elderly sisters who play a game of poker to decide who will take care of their elderly mother. Proving that blood isn’t always necessarily thicker than water, not while one sister might get stuck looking after their wheelchair-ridden mother. However, sometimes life doesn’t work out the way it’s planned.

 

A couple of the short films that stood out for me were Louise Ni Fhiannachta’s Rúbaí and Mairtín de Barra’s Atrophy.

Rúbaí had an exceedingly good storyline entwined with some comedy and heartfelt drama. The acting was fantastic and the dialogue was very well thought-out. A definite must see for all age groups.

Mairtín de Barra’s Atrophy storyline is very current and one that I’m sure will resonate with a lot of people. The acting from Pat Deery is so expressive and endearing, proving the strength and talent of Deerly’s ability as an actor. De Barra made a fantastic choice in casting him.  The set captures the life of the old man perfectly. Everything about this short film was very well executed.  Another short to add to the list of must sees.

All in all it’s apparent that the Irish film industry is safe in the hands of the new and emerging Irish talent that are storming through the film festival circuits. And of course, they made my Valentine’s super pleasant and even managed to give my heart a little flutter.

 

Click here for further coverage from the 12th Jameson Dublin International Film Festival.

JDIFF’s selection of  Irish shorts screened on Friday, 14th February 2014 as part of the 12th Jameson Dublin International Film Festival (13 – 23 February 2014).

Share

On The Reel on the Red Carpet at JDIFF Irish premiere of ‘Calvary’

Check out the video report from the Red Carpet at JDIFF’s Irish premiere of Calvary from our bestest buddies On The Reel in association with Film Ireland.

Lynn Larkin glammed up to meet the stars as they rocked into Dublin’s Savoy cinema for the Irish premiere of John Michael McDonagh’s new film, Calvary, which opened this year’s Jameson Dublin International Film Festival.

Lynn chats to the film’s star, Brendan Gleeson, about being a total legend, and director John Michael McDonagh about assembling such a great cast.

Lynn also gets the low-down on Gleeson from co-star Marie-Josée Croze, asks Dylan Moran about boozing and riding, and chats to Killian Scott and Aidan Gillen about their bromance.

And be sure to catch special guest John Hurt bust a move on the red carpet…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHM-0rTzs9E

Share

On The Reel On The Red Carpet at Anchorman 2 Premiere

Anchorman - Paul 2

On The Reel‘s Lynn Larkin managed to catch up with the cast of Anchorman 2 at the Irish Premiere in the Savoy Cinema on O’Connell street.

Anchorman 2 left San Diego and came to Dublin for the film’s Irish premiere at the Savoy cinema. Will Ferrell, Paul Rudd, David Koechner, Steve Carell and director Adam McKay all entered the glass case of emotion on O’Connell Street to meet and greet their Irish fans.

During their chat Paul Rudd explains to Lynn why Fantana will continue to be as naughty as ever and Steve Carell talks about Brick’s new love interest, Kristen Wigg, and what it was like working with her.

David Koechner (Champ) licks the microphone and explains why it’s not just the women in the movie that are strong characters but women globally. And director Adam McKay explains how difficult it was to keep a straight face during the shoot.

Finally, Lynn gives Will Ferrell (Ron Burgundy) a special little gift and in return Will serenades Lynn with Ron’s moving love song to a shark named Doby.

 

 

Anchorman 2 opens in cinemas on Wednesday, 18th December

Share

Anchorman 2 – Dublin Premiere: Will Ferrell Sings for Film Ireland

Anchorman - Will 2

 

Last night, Anchorman 2 left San Diego and came to Dublin for the film’s Irish premiere at the Savoy cinema. Will Ferrell, Paul Rudd, David Koechner, Steve Carell and director Adam McKay all entered the glass case of emotion on O’Connell Street to meet and greet their Irish fans.

Lynn Larkin was there for Film Ireland and On The Reel to present Will Ferrell with The Little Book of Moustaches. In return Will serenades Lynn with Ron Burgundy’s moving love song to a shark named Doby.
 

 
Keep an eye on On the Reel for full red carpet footage.
 
Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues officially opens in Irish cinemas on 18th December.

 

Share

Cinema Review: Call Girl

CALL-GIRL-3-LARGE

DIR: Mikael Marcimain • WRI: Marietta von Hausswolff von Baumgarten• PRO: Mimmi Spång • ED: Kristofer Nordin • DOP: Hoyte Van Hoytema  DES: Michael Higgins, Lina Nordqvist • CAST: Sofia Karemyr, Simon J. Berger, Josefin Asplund

Like most good stories it seems reality wins out over fiction every time. Call Girl tells the story of underage prostitution in the world of high society. Hidden behind a curtain of glitz and glamour a truly painful and disturbing story of child grooming is unveiled.

Set in Stockholm in the late 1970s on the cusp of a Swedish scandal known as Bordellhärvan, the story is based around a shamefully corrupt world of politicians, prostitution, drugs, and stripping discotheques. Iris Dahl (Sofia Karemyr) is a young adolescent girl who is living in a youth house for troubled teens when she is recruited into a sordid underworld with her friend. Dagmar Glans (Pernilla August) is at the heart of the recruitment, buying the girls clothes, giving them money and fuelling them with alcohol and drugs under the rouse of befriending and mothering the girls. This gives a very tangible and dark look into how grooming takes place with disconcerting ease for the abusers involved. There are scenes that make for somewhat difficult and uneasy viewing at times. It is shot fly-on-the-wall style, albeit one that could be swatted at any moment if discovered.

Casting was fantastic both for the believable performances and the non-conventional Hollywood glamorized body types we are all accustomed to seeing in movies nowadays, which works well with the film’s documentary style, however it could have moved along a lot faster. Understandably the director has shown the amount of time and effort that goes into grooming when money is at stake.

Dagmar Glans is portrayed as a successful and enigmatic woman loved by “her girls” and clients. Nevertheless she herself partakes not only in the “parties” but in prostitution which makes her quite perplexing but also intriguing. Unfortunately due to the underdevelopment of some of the main players and the missed opportunity to delve more into Glans’ world you’re left with lots of unanswered questions. This might have been the idea behind some of the choices in the film but obviously not all of them. I really wanted to know why Glans involved herself as much as she did in the repugnant lifestyle, we might have been able to empathise or understand her a little if this was explained slightly, instead, I couldn’t have cared less what happened to her!

Overall it works as whistle-blower type movie managing to shine a light on certain people in authority, surrounding the alleged illegal underage prostitution and sleazy activities occurring in the Swedish government department and high-profile organizations.

 

Lynn Larkin

140 mins
Call Girl is released on 16th August 2013

 

Share

Cinema Review: Blackfish

black-mnn
DIR: Gabriela Cowperthwaite • WRI: Gabriela Cowperthwaite, Eli B. Despres •  PRO: Manuel Oteyza • DOP: Ross Emery • ED: Gabriela Cowperthwaite, Eli B. Despres • Cast: Samantha Berg, Dave Duffus, Dean Gomersall, Tilikum

Blackfish is truly captivating in every sense of the word.

The story centres around the life of the 31 year-old, 6-ton killer whale Tilikum, who has been directly responsible for the death of 3 people, including Dawn Brancheau, the former senior trainer at SeaWorld in Orlando. Most of us can remember the explosive news item when it first hit the press back in 2010 and the uproar from activists around the world that followed.  Now, Blackfish explores the reasoning behind the likely “psychosis” Tilikum has experienced in captivity and exposes how the executives at SeaWorld have tried to cover-up the truth and lay the blame at their “beloved” trainers.

The documentary stems back to when the Orcas were first captured for human entertainment and the heartache these magnificent creatures face when a member of their family is captured and stolen before their very eyes. Some Orcas were so badly traumatised as to suffer a massive heart attack during the event; later to be disposed of by their attackers – by being gutted and filled with stones to anchor their lifeless bodies to the seabed to prevent raising suspicion from authorities. Shockingly SeaWorld themselves carried out these horrific abductions under a different name. The real-life footage of these Orcas crying in distress and the harrowing interviews with former SeaWorld trainers is almost too much to bear.

Since the 1970s, killer whales have attacked just two dozen people worldwide. But critics claim the animals can become aggressive when kept captive due to higher levels of stress and the unnatural living conditions. In November 2006, a 3-ton killer whale dragged its handler, Ken Peters, underwater more than once at the SeaWorld theme park in Florida during a routine trick. It seems all living creatures have their limitations.

Blackfish, along with the 2009 Oscar-nominated film The Cove, have no doubt changed how a vast amount of people view captivity and theme parks. Hopefully, it will do the same for many more across the world. The only way to stop captivity and make a real change, one that SeaWorld will notice, is to make a dent in their pocket by not attending their parks and shows.

Director Gabriela Cowperthwaite has done an incredible job shining a light on this sordid industry. The footage is gripping throughout the entire film. This movie will have an everlasting influence on those that watch it. How many movies can you say that about? Go on and take the plunge; you’ll hardly be able to come up for air.

Lynn Larkin

90 mins
Blackfish is released on 25th July 2013

Blackfish – Official Website

Share

JDIFF 2013: Call Girl

Lynn Larkin makes a call on Call Girl, which screened as part of the 11th Jameson Dublin International Film Festival (14-24 February 2013)

Call Girl

Thurs, 21st February

Light House 1

20.20

 

For most good stories it seems reality wins out over fiction every time. Call Girl tells the story of underage prostitution in the world of high society. Hidden behind a curtain of glitz and glamour a truly painful and disturbing story of child grooming is unveiled.

Set in Stockholm in the late 1970s on the cusp of a Swedish scandal known as Bordellhärvan, the story is based around a shamefully corrupt world of politicians, prostitution, drugs, and stripping discotheques.  Iris Dahl (Sofia Karemyr) is a young adolescent girl who is living in a youth house for troubled teens when she is recruited into a sordid underworld with her friend. Dagmar Glans (Pernilla August) is at the heart of the recruitment, buying the girls clothes, giving them money and fuelling them with alcohol and drugs under the rouse of befriending and mothering the girls. This gives a very tangible and dark look into how grooming takes place with disconcerting ease for the abusers involved. There are scenes that make for somewhat difficult and uneasy viewing at times. It is shot fly-on-the-wall style, albeit one that could be swatted at any moment if discovered.

Casting was fantastic both for the believable performances and the non-conventional Hollywood glamorized body types we are all accustomed to seeing in movies nowadays, which works well with the film’s documentary style, however it could have moved along a lot faster. Understandably the director has shown the amount of time and effort that goes into grooming when money is at stake.

Dagmar Glans is portrayed as a successful and enigmatic woman loved by “her girls” and clients. Nevertheless she herself partakes not only in the “parties” but in prostitution which makes her quite perplexing but also intriguing. Unfortunately due to the underdevelopment of some of the main players and the missed opportunity to delve more into Glans’ world you’re left with lots of unanswered questions. This might have been the idea behind some of the choices in the film but obviously not all of them. I really wanted to know why Glans involved herself as much as she did in the repugnant lifestyle, we might have been able to empathise or understand her a little if this was explained slightly, instead, I couldn’t have cared less what happened to her!

Overall it works as whistle-blower type movie managing to shine a light on certain people in authority, surrounding the alleged illegal underage prostitution and sleazy activities occurring in the Swedish government department and high profile organizations.

Just keep in mind it’s a subtitled dark thriller. So, let’s just say, it’s not the type of film you’d go to see with popcorn and jellies in hand!

 Lynn Larkin

Share

JDIFF 2013: Jump

 

Lynn Larkin takes a look at Jump, which screened as part of the 11th Jameson Dublin International Film Festival (14-24 February 2013).

Jump

Tue, 19th February
Light House 1
21.00
82 mins

Jump opens with some beautiful colourful shots of Derry, which are accompanied by the VO of our main character Greta (Nichola Burley). She is battling deep depression surrounding her life due to the people closest to her. This black comedy tackles the very serious issue of suicide, while maintaining the story’s entertainment factor.

The backdrop for Jump is Derry and it’s New Year’s Eve. Just like the title, the story jumps and intertwines three stories throughout the film.

Standing on top of the stunningly shot Derry Peace Bridge is ‘our’ Greta deciding if she can muster up the courage to bungee off minus the cord but with her makeshift wings in tow. Her concentration is distracted when her knight in torn and blood-stained armour shows up in the form of Pearse Kelly (Martin McCann). However, this damsel is in no mood to be rescued. The two exchange heated words to find they share a common interest. Their hatred for local gangster Frank Feeney (Lalor Roddy), who just happens to be Greta’s father. The two set off into the night with a creative adventure in mind.

The film’s fast-paced tempo keeps you locked in the story from start to finish. Some of the secondary characters could have featured a little more. Good-time players Marie and Dara’s one-liners and unusual scenarios the pair find themselves in throughout the course of the night are hilarious.

The passionate UK-born director Kieron J. Walsh spoke after the screening with a small Q&A. The inspiration for Jump came to him after he heard that someone he admired and looked up to mention that ‘A story always needs a beginning, middle and end. However, not exactly in that order.’

This really sums up what Walsh did with this movie, making it a fresh and pleasant watch. He spoke about why he chose Derry, not only for its beautifully magnetic Derry Peace Bridge; but since everyone in Derry dresses up in costume for all major events, not just at Halloween, it was the obvious choice.

Jump is endearing and enchanting; words I didn’t think I’d use to describe a dark comic crime thriller that tackles the topic of suicide… but there you go; life’s full of surprises, just like the movie.

Take a leap of faith and Jump, it’s a free-fall extravaganza.

Lynn Larkin

Share