In Conversation with Emer Reynolds

Emer Reynolds

Emer Reynolds

 

On Friday, 22 March 2019, 6 – 7:30pm TCD will host anin conversation’ event with Emer Reynolds, writer and director of The Farthest (2017) chaired by Prof Ruth Barton(TCD) co-organised by Trinity School of Creative Arts and CONNECT.

Award-winning editor, writer and documentary director, Emer Reynolds, will discuss her acclaimed film,The Farthest  with Associate Professor in Film Studies, Ruth Barton, and CONNECT Principal Investigator, Marco Ruffini, in the Long Room Hub on Friday March 22, at 6pm.

The Farthest tells the inspiring story of Nasa’sVoyager space probes in the words of the men and women who designed and built the spacecraft. Interspersed with extraordinary imagery from the journey through space,The Farthest played at festivals worldwide, culminating in winning an Emmy in the category of ‘Outstanding Science and Technology Documentary’ in 2018. A celebration of the possibilities of scientific vision and of the humanity of those behind these experiments, including the creators of the ‘golden record’ made to enlighten possible alien encounters about life on earth,The Farthest is a testament to the potential of the human imagination.

Register here 
The interview will include sequences from The Farthest alongside a discussion of the film.

Accessibility: Yes
Campus LocationTrinity Long Room Hub
Room: Neill Lecture Theatre
Audience: Undergrad, Postgrad, Alumni, Faculty & Staff, Public
Cost: Free (but registration is essential)
More infowww.eventbrite.ie…

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‘The Farthest’ Emmy Success

Emer Reynolds’ documentary The Farthest won the Emmy for Outstanding Science and Technology documentary at the 39th News & Documentary Emmys on Monday evening.

Producer John Murray accepted the award with the team behind the film saying it was “a privilege” to be able to make a film about the Voyager spacecraft.

Reynolds is currently in pre-production for a documentary about Phil Lynott.

You can watch the acceptance speech below:

 

 

Podcast: Emer Reynolds, director of ‘The Farthest’

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Irish Film Review: The Farthest

DIR/WRI: Emer Reynolds • PRO: John Murray, Clare Stronge • DOP: Kate McCullough • ED: Tony Cranstoun • MUS: Ray Harman • CAST: Frank Drake, Carolyn Porco, John Casani

Winning the Audience Award at the Audi Dublin International Film Festival this year says a lot about The Farthest. Many films were well-received at the festival, yet a science documentary is the one that left the biggest impact on the audience. This is not only because of the mind-blowing implications of its subject matter; the story of the farthest man-made object from Earth. The assured direction of Emer Reynolds (http://filmireland.net/2017/02/19/podcast-interview-with-emer-reynolds-director-of-the-farthest/) presented the story with cinematic presence. When documentaries feature impressive visuals such as those here, it commands its place on the big screen.

The Farthest tells the story of the two Voyager spacecrafts, launched into space by NASA in 1977 and currently leaving the outer boundaries of our solar system. In marking the 40th anniversary, The Farthest gathers an impressive assortment of interviews from people closely involved in the Voyager program. The purpose of the project was to send two spacecrafts on a reconnaissance mission of the solar system’s planets, transmitting new discoveries back to Earth before leaving the solar system and hurtling off into interstellar space forever. If not strictly “forever”, the spacecrafts were designed to last for billions of years and could potentially outlast planet Earth itself and be the only trace that we ever existed.

Not one to miss the bigger picture, Carl Sagan realised the Voyager program had an entirely unique but time-sensitive opportunity; sending a time capsule of Earth’s civilisation into space. With only months to go before the launch, Sagan received NASA’s blessing to lead a team producing a Golden Record that would be stored onboard with visual instructions on how to play it. It is virtually impossible that Voyager will ever be intercepted by an alien civilisation but IF one discovers it, they could transfer frequencies on the record onto a screen and see 115 images of Earth. They would also hear a selection of the Earth’s noises and human languages as well as a 90-minute selection of music from across the world’s cultures. It is worth listening to the record’s contents online and reflecting on humanity’s presentation of itself in the 1970s.

Since the chances of its discovery by extra-terrestrials are miniscule, the Voyager Golden Record is primarily a statement for ourselves; a reflection of our higher values and an invaluable thought experiment on how we would present ourselves to a galaxy many have yearned to explore. It was created during a very specific sliver of time in the 1970s; the threat of environmental destruction loomed, the threat of nuclear holocaust persisted. The world was being torn in all sorts of directions amid an unprecedented technology boom yet it was beginning to be perceived as a global community facing common responsibilities. Sending a message in a bottle to outer space was a bold statement for the time, suggesting a species optimistic enough that it would triumph over its problems.

So fascinating are the implications of the Golden Record that it often gets the most focus over Voyager’s scientific team and their amazing discoveries about our solar system. Emer Reynolds weaves these threads together, each given equal weight to the Voyager’s physical journey of mind-blowing proportions and to the stories of the people who worked on this incredible project. Candour is drawn from a diverse range of people involved in this project and distilled into a two-hour running time packed full of information presented with clarity and momentum.

The thrill of discovery that scientists felt about each planet is conveyed with great impact. The long stretches of travel between planets are when the focus shifts to broader issues at play or the contents of the Golden Record, whose selection could justify a documentary of its own. This narrative structure allows The Farthest to take a broader view of the project and build chronologically towards the stunning realisation that objects made by human hands are now outside of our solar system.

As incredible as this story is, a lesser director would not have made the subject come alive as a cinematic experience. Emer Reynolds crafts a strong audio-visual sensibility to The Farthest. A soundscape of radio frequency noises and an eclectic soundtrack engage the viewer. Ray Harman’s poignant compositions complement music taken from the Voyager Golden Record’s collection. Other licensed tracks, apart from the closing song, all come from 1977 or earlier, grounding the film’s vibe in the era during which Voyager left Earth never to return. This imbues the Voyager with a character insofar as it can be but the visual sensibility on display here is anything but dated.

Opening shots of the sky are beautifully sharp compositions by cinematographer Kate McCullough. That McCullough has worked primarily in documentary before illustrates that strong visuals needn’t be absent from the form of documentary nor should they be. Visual effects are refreshingly alternated between CG shots of Voyager in space and close-up footage of paints, chemicals and dyes mixing together in fabulous galactic tableaus. The latter technique was pioneered by Douglas Trumbull for stunning sequences in 2001: A Space Odyssey and The Tree of Life.

A particularly jaw-dropping visual accompanies the approach to each planet by showing the actual approach to each planet. Black-and-white photos from Voyager during their long approach towards planets are edited into an enthralling montage as each grey world looms out of the immense darkness. There are so many surprises from Voyager’s images and from rich archive footage precisely selected to build the story’s momentum.

This is all edited together into a superb cinematic experience and one with a far more global consciousness than any Irish film to date. The cosmic perspective it instils makes threats to the environment seem inexcusably reckless and national boundaries seem petty. It also makes space exploration seem daunting yet utterly captivating for its possibilities. The Farthest has a profound impact on viewers such that it would make them appreciate these words of Carl Sagan, “How lucky we are to live in this time, the first moment in human history, where we are in fact visiting other worlds”.

Jonathan Victory

120 minutes
PG (See IFCO for details)

The Farthest is released 28th July 2017

The Farthest – Official Website

 

 

This review originally appeared March 22, 2017 @ http://filmireland.net/2017/03/22/adiff-2017-irish-film-review-the-farthest/

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ADIFF 2017 Irish Film Review: The Farthest

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Jonathan Victory voyages to The Farthest, Emer Reynolds’ documentary on NASA’s Voyager mission.

Winning the Audience Award at the Audi Dublin International Film Festival this year says a lot about The Farthest. Many films were well-received at the festival, yet a science documentary is one that left the biggest impact on the audience. This is not only because of the mind-blowing implications of its subject matter; the story of the farthest man-made object from Earth. The assured direction of Emer Reynolds (http://filmireland.net/2017/02/19/podcast-interview-with-emer-reynolds-director-of-the-farthest/ ) presented the story with cinematic presence. When documentaries feature impressive visuals such as those here, it commands its place on the big screen.

The Farthest tells the story of the two Voyager spacecrafts, launched into space by NASA in 1977 and currently leaving the outer boundaries of our solar system. In marking the 40th anniversary, The Farthest gathers an impressive assortment of interviews from people closely involved in the Voyager program. The purpose of the project was to send two spacecraft on a reconnaissance mission of the solar system’s planets, transmitting new discoveries back to Earth before leaving the solar system and hurtling off into interstellar space forever. If not strictly “forever”, the spacecraft were designed to last for billions of years and could potentially outlast planet Earth itself and be the only trace that we ever existed.

Not one to miss the bigger picture, Carl Sagan realised the Voyager program had an entirely unique but time-sensitive opportunity; sending a time capsule of Earth’s civilisation into space. With only months to go before the launch, Sagan received NASA’s blessing to lead a team producing a Golden Record that would be stored onboard with visual instructions on how to play it. It is virtually impossible that Voyager will ever be intercepted by an alien civilisation but IF one discovers it, they could transfer frequencies on the record onto a screen and see 115 images of Earth. They would also hear a selection of the Earth’s noises and human languages as well as a 90-minute selection of music from across the world’s cultures. It is worth listening to the record’s contents online and reflecting on humanity’s presentation of itself in the 1970s.

Since the chances of its discovery by extra-terrestrials are miniscule, the Voyager Golden Record is primarily a statement for ourselves; a reflection of our higher values and an invaluable thought experiment on how we would present ourselves to a galaxy many have yearned to explore. It was created during a very specific sliver of time in the 1970s; the threat of environmental destruction loomed, the threat of nuclear holocaust persisted. The world was being torn in all sorts of directions amid an unprecedented technology boom yet it was beginning to be perceived as a global community facing common responsibilities. Sending a message in a bottle to outer space was a bold statement for the time, suggesting a species optimistic enough that it would triumph over its problems.

So fascinating are the implications of the Golden Record that it often gets the most focus over Voyager’s scientific team and their amazing discoveries about our solar system. Emer Reynolds weaves these threads together, each given equal weight to the Voyager’s physical journey of mind-blowing proportions and to the stories of the people who worked on this incredible project. Candour is drawn from a diverse range of people involved in this project and distilled into a two-hour running time packed full of information presented with clarity and momentum.

The thrill of discovery that scientists felt about each planet is conveyed with great impact. The long stretches of travel between planets are when the focus shifts to broader issues at play or the contents of the Golden Record, whose selection could justify a documentary of its own. This narrative structure allows The Farthest to take a broader view of the project and build chronologically towards the stunning realisation that objects made by human hands are now outside of our solar system.

As incredible as this story is, a lesser director would not have made the subject come alive as a cinematic experience. Emer Reynolds crafts a strong audio-visual sensibility to The Farthest. A soundscape of radio frequency noises and an eclectic soundtrack engage the viewer. Ray Harman’s poignant compositions complement music taken from the Voyager Golden Record’s collection. Other licensed tracks, apart from the closing song, all come from 1977 or earlier, grounding the film’s vibe in the era during which Voyager left Earth never to return. This imbues the Voyager with a character insofar as it can be but the visual sensibility on display here is anything but dated.

Opening shots of the sky are beautifully sharp compositions by cinematographer Kate McCullough. That McCullough has worked primarily in documentary before illustrates that strong visuals needn’t be absent from the form of documentary nor should they be. Visual effects are refreshingly alternated between CG shots of Voyager in space and close-up footage of paints, chemicals and dyes mixing together in fabulous galactic tableaus. The latter technique was pioneered by Douglas Trumbull for stunning sequences in 2001: A Space Odyssey and The Tree of Life.

A particularly jaw-dropping visual accompanies the approach to each planet by showing the actual approach to each planet. Black-and-white photos from Voyager during their long approach towards planets are edited into an enthralling montage as each grey world looms out of the immense darkness. There are so many surprises from Voyager’s images and from rich archive footage precisely selected to build the story’s momentum.

This is all edited together into a superb cinematic experience and one with a far more global consciousness than any Irish film to date. The cosmic perspective it instils makes threats to the environment seem inexcusably reckless and national boundaries seem petty. It also makes space exploration seem daunting yet utterly captivating for its possibilities. The Farthest has a profound impact on viewers such that it would make them appreciate these words of Carl Sagan, “How lucky we are to live in this time, the first moment in human history, where we are in fact visiting other worlds”.

The Farthest screened on Sunday 26th February 2017 at the Savoy as part of the Audi Dublin International Film Festival.

 

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Podcast: Interview with Emer Reynolds, Director of ‘The Farthest’

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Jonathan Victory talks to Emer Reynolds about her stunning documentary on NASA’s Voyager mission, which screens at this year’s Audi Dublin International Film Festival. 

It is one of humankind’s greatest achievements. More than 12 billion miles away a tiny spaceship is leaving our Solar System and entering the void of deep space – the first man-made object ever to do so. Dying within its heart is a nuclear generator that will beat for perhaps another decade before the lights on Voyager 1 finally go out. But this little craft will travel on for millions of years, carrying a Golden Record bearing recordings and images of life on Earth. In all likelihood Voyager will outlast humanity. The Farthest will celebrates these magnificent machines, the men and women who built them and the vision that propelled them farther than anyone could ever have hoped.

The Farthest screens on Sunday, 26th Feb 2017 at 2:00pm at the Savoy cinema.

Director Emer Reynolds and Voyager Project Manager (1977) John Casani will attend this screening.

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Women in Film & Television Ireland Podcast: In Conversation with Emer Reynolds & Lisa Mulcachy

Editor-Emer-Reynolds-300x247

In Conversation with Emer Reynolds & Lisa Mulcahy

Film Ireland is delighted to be working with Women in Film and Television Ireland to record, archive and share the organisation’s monthly events.

Women in Film and Television Ireland‘s first monthly members’ event (21st October 2015) featured award-winning Irish film editor Emer Reynolds and award-winning film and TV director Lisa Mulcahy in conversation.

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In Conversation with Emer Reynolds and Lisa Mulcahy took place on Wednesday, October 21st at 6pm.

For membership details click here

 

Emer Reynolds – Editor and Director

Emer Reynolds, multiple award winning Film Editor, and Grierson-nominated Director, is based in Dublin, Ireland. Her feature editing credits include I Went Down, The Actors, The Eclipse, Patrick’s Day, My Name is Emily and the recently completed adaptation of the Carol Shields novel, Unless. Her documentary work includes One Million Dubliners, We went to War, Broken Tail and the multi-award winning series The Secret Life of the Shannon. TV Drama includes the opening two series of C4’s groundbreaking drama Shameless. Emer has written and directed four short films and directed the RTÉ drama series Trouble in Paradise. Her feature documentary on the Cuban Missile Crisis, Here Was Cuba, also her documentary directorial debut, was screened in festivals worldwide, on More4 and was nominated for a Grierson Award 2014. She is currently directing The Farthest, a feature documentary space opera, featuring the plucky Voyager spacecraft.

 

Lisa Mulcahy – Director

Lisa has recently been IFTA nominated for Best Director – Soap/Comedy for her work on Red Rock the critically acclaimed ensemble drama for TV3. She has completed 16 episodes (including the season 1 finale) and is about to shoot the first four episodes for Season 2. Her award winning feature film The Legend of Longwood which she directed and co-wrote will be in Cinemas in Ireland from October 23rd 2015 and was released in the US and Holland in June 2015 and Germany in September. Her first feature film Situations Vacant, a comedy shot in Dublin, was released nationwide in Ireland in December 2009. Her Hallmark Movie Gift of the Magi was broadcast over the 2010/2011 Christmas season in the US. Her short movie Coming Home has received thousands of hits on the internet. She was the lead director on the award winning RTÉ drama series The Clinic and directed twelve episodes in total over five seasons. She also directed episodes of On Home Ground, another RTÉ drama.

She has directed documentaries and short films as well as numerous commercials for Television and cinema. In a previous existence she was a first Assistant Director on many films and television dramas in Ireland and abroad and began her career in the industry as an assistant film editor in Dublin and then London.

 

Women in Film and Television Ireland

Women in Film and Television International is a voluntary foundation promoting greater representation of women on screen and behind the camera, with a membership of over thirteen thousand professionals worldwide.

Women in Film and Television Ireland is a branch of Women in Film and Television International. The Irish branch is a voluntary body run by film and TV professionals of international standing. Our committee members represent the creative, business and technical divisions of the Irish audiovisual sector. We are all internationally credited and the recipients of industry-recognized awards. Our intention in creating this organization is to ensure that the film and television industry functions as a meritocratic, sustainable and successful force into the future.

 

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InConversation with Emer Reynolds

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This episode of InConversation features Emer Reynolds, writer, director and IFTA-winning film editor. Emer has won IFTAs for Timbuktu (2003), her work on the opening series of Channel 4’s groundbreaking Shameless (2004) and My Brothers (2011). Emer’s other feature credits include The Good Doctor, The Eclipse, The Actors, Small Engine Repair, and I Went Down. Most recently, Emer has worked on Terry McMahon’s Patrick’s Day and Aoife Kelleher’s One Million Dubliners.

Notable documentaries include The Asylum, Today is Better Than Two Tomorrows and We Went to War. Emer has written and directed four short films: Slumber, Man, The Widow’s Son and White, and directed the RTÉ drama 6 part-series Trouble in Paradise. Here Was Cuba was her documentary directorial debut.

 

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InConversation is an ongoing series of  personal interviews with people working across the many aspects of the Irish filmmaking industry.

Follow InConversation on twitter @InConversation1 & like on Facebook

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Irish Documentary ‘Here Was Cuba’ Screens on More 4

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Screening on More 4 this Saturday, 16th November at 9pm, Here Was Cuba is a landmark documentary exploring what happened over 13 days in October 1962 when the fate of the world lay ultimately in the hands of just three men.

The documentary screens as part of More4’s  season of films around the JFK Assassination. The film is listed as Kennedy’s Nuclear Nightmare.

Directed by Emer Reynolds and John Murray, the doc tells the inside story of the Cuban Missile Crisis, delves into how, in October 1962, the earth teetered on the very brink of nuclear holocaust. In the first major feature documentary on the subject, the film brings to life the three central characters Kennedy, Castro and Khrushchev and explores how the world’s most powerful men fell into an abyss of their own making and what courage and luck it took to climb out again. With nuclear brinkmanship high on the international agenda today, the events of October 1962 hold invaluable lessons for a generation too young to remember just how close we came to the end.

 

Click here for an interview with Emer Reynolds, one of the film’s directors

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Preview of Irish Film at IFI Stranger Than Fiction: Here Was Cuba

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IFI Stranger Than Fiction (26 – 29 Sep, 2013)

Here Was Cuba

Sunday, 29th July

18.15

Directed by Emer Reynolds and John Murray, Here Was Cuba tells the inside story of the Cuban Missile Crisis, exploring how in October 1962 the earth teetered on the very brink of nuclear holocaust. In the first major feature documentary on the subject, the film brings to life the three central characters Kennedy, Castro and Khrushchev and explores how the world’s most powerful men fell into an abyss of their own making and what courage and luck it took to climb out again. With nuclear brinkmanship high on the international agenda today, the events of October 1962 hold invaluable lessons for a generation too young to remember just how close we came to the end.

Emer Reynolds told Film Ireland: “We are thrilled to be screening Here Was Cuba at the wonderful, eclectic and educational Stranger than Fiction Festival. It’s the film’s first outing in Dublin, and we are very excited to be showing it to an audience of documentary-lovers.”

 

There will be a post-screening Q&A hosted by Alan Maher with directors Emer Reynolds and John Murray.

 

Tickets for all IFI Stranger Than Fiction films and panel discussions are on sale NOW at the IFI Box Office on 01 679 3477 and can also be booked on www.ifi.ie/stf where you can find out full details for all the films and events in IFI Stranger than Fiction.

 

You can read an interview with Emer Reynolds here

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Irish Film at the Galway Film Fleadh preview: Here Was Cuba

Here Was Cuba

The 25th Galway Film Fleadh (9 – 14 July, 2013)

Here Was Cuba

Thursday, 11th July

Town Hall Theatre

17.00

Emer Reynolds and John Murray’s documentary, Here Was Cuba, screens tomorrow, 11th July, at the 25th Galway Film Fleadh. It is the first major feature documentary on the Cuban Missile Crisis.

On screening the documentary at the festival, the Dublin-based director and triple IFTA winning editor Emer Reynolds told Film Ireland, ‘We are looking forward very much to screening Here Was Cuba at the Fleadh. It’ll be our first screening here in Ireland, and we are very much looking forward to hearing the home-crowd response. The audience in Galway are always very receptive, enthusiastic and vocal, and it’s very exciting to be able to present the film there. ‘

Here Was Cuba explores how in October 1962 the earth teetered on the very brink of nuclear holocaust. The documentary brings to life the three central characters Kennedy, Castro and Khrushchev and explores how the world’s most powerful men fell into an abyss of their own making and what courage and luck it took to climb out again. Featuring revealing interviews with key witnesses and experts, including Sergei Khrushchev, son of the former Soviet Premier, and, in one of his last-ever interviews, Kennedy’s trusted advisor Ted Sorensen, Here was Cuba is an edge-of-your seat tale of espionage and intrigue at the highest level, offering a fascinating perspective on one of the most harrowing times in modern history. With nuclear brinkmanship high on the international agenda today, the events of October 1962 hold invaluable lessons for a generation too young to remember just how close we came to the end.

Tickets are available to book from the Town Hall Theatre on 091 569777 or at www.tht.ie.

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