‘Love Eternal’ Screens at Twisted Celluloid Film Festival

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Love Eternal, which was partially shot in Cobh, County Cork, will have its Cork premiere as opening film of the Twisted Celluloid Film Festival in the Triskel Arts Centre on Thursday 15th May. Actress Emma Eliza Regan will introduce this special screening of Love Eternal.

Love Eternal, directed by Brendan Muldowney (Savage), recently won the Dublin Film Critics Circle Best Irish Feature Award at the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival, and will be released in Irish cinemas by Wildcard Distribution on July 4th.

Featuring the Emmy-nominated Dutch actor, Robert de Hoog, and Scottish actress Pollyanna McIntosh, and based on the Japanese novel In Love With The Dead, from acclaimed author Kei Oishi (Apartment 1303, The Last Supper), the film centres on an isolated and death-fixated young man who tries to make sense of the world, and his existence, in the only way he knows how…by getting closer to death.

Love Eternal was produced by Conor Barry, Morgan Bushe and Macdara Kelleher at Fastnet Films, with Luxembourg co-producers Red Lion, Dutch co-producers Rinkel Film, TO Entertainment from Japan, with support from the Irish Film Board / Bord Scannán na hÉireann, the Film Fund Luxembourg, the Netherlands Film Fund and Atlantic Screen Music.

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Podcast: Filmmakers Roundtable – Part II

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In Part II of this Film Ireland podcast Stephen Shields, Conor McMahon, Ciarán Foy, Conor Barry and Brendan Muldowney talk about the place of reviews, critics, bloggers and trolls in the age of social media. They also discuss how audiences consume film, pitching & marketing film, ‘Irish’ film and the Irish accent in film.

Stephen Shields is the screenwriter on RTE Storyland winner Zombie Bashers, Republic Of Telly, and Newsbag.

Conor McMahon is the director of Stitches, Dead Meat and The Braineater.

Ciarán Foy is the director and writer of Citadel.

Brendan Muldowney is the director of Savage and Love Eternal.

Conor Barry is the producer of Savage and Love Eternal and was selected as Ireland’s ‘Producer on the Move’ for this year’s Cannes International Film Festival.

 

You can listen to Part I of this podcast here, in which Stephen Shields, Conor McMahon, Ciarán Foy, Conor Barry and Brendan Muldowney talk about their paths into making films and discuss the crafts of writing, acting, editing, directing and producing.

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Podcast: Filmmakers Roundtable – Part I

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In Part I of this Film Ireland podcast Stephen Shields, Conor McMahon, Ciarán Foy, Conor Barry and Brendan Muldowney talk about their paths into making films and discuss the crafts of writing, acting, editing, directing and producing.

Stephen Shields is the screenwriter on RTE Storyland winner Zombie Bashers, Republic Of Telly, and Newsbag.

Conor McMahon is the director of Stitches, Dead Meat and The Braineater.

Ciarán Foy is the director and writer of Citadel.

Brendan Muldowney is the director of Savage and Love Eternal.

Conor Barry is the producer of Savage and Love Eternal and was selected as Ireland’s ‘Producer on the Move’ for this year’s Cannes International Film Festival.

 

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Irish Film at the Galway Film Fleadh preview: Love Eternal

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The 25th Galway Film Fleadh (9 – 14 July, 2013)

Love Eternal

Friday, 12th July

Town Hall Theatre

19.00

Following the success of his debut feature, Savage, director Brendan Muldowney returns to the screen with his new film, Love Eternal, which screens at the 25th Galway Film Fleadh. Based on the Japanese novel In Love with the Dead, by Kei Oishi, the film focuses on a death-fixated young man trying to make sense of the world.

Conor Barry and the team behind Dublin based Fastnet Films co-produced the film with Rinkel Films of the Netherlands, Red Lion and T.O. Entertainment. A truly international venture, post-production took place in Luxembourg, making it the first Irish/Luxembourg feature to go into production following the signing of a co-production treaty at the 2011 Galway Film Fleadh.

Brendan Muldowney told Film Ireland, ‘I’m delighted to be screening Love Eternal at the 25th Galway Film Fleadh. It’s festival I have a long history with and one which was instrumental in moving my career forward’.

When Ian Harding’s (Robert de Hoog) mother dies, this isolated man must venture into a world that he no longer understands. Unable to comprehend basic human emotions, he takes the decision to end it all in a snowy forest clearing, but a rare chance encounter will change his life. Love Eternal is a rich cinematic experience, and, in his exploration of notions of life, death and the universe as a whole, Muldowney has created a bold cinematic landscape all his own.

Tickets are available to book from the Town Hall Theatre on 091 569777 or at www.tht.ie.


LOVE ETERNAL // a film by Brendan Muldowney… by reelsuspects

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Interview: Conor Barry

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The 14th edition of Producers on the Move will be held during the Cannes Film Festival ( 18-21 May). Since its launch 14 years ago, Producers on the Move has brought 270 producers together over four days during Cannes and aims to lay the foundation for future collaborations at round table meetings and co-production lunches. This year 29 producers from 29 different European countries will take part in the event. Among them is Irish producer Conor Barry.

Conor graduated from the IADT in Dun Laoghaire (the National Film School). He has worked very closely with the writer/director – Brendan Muldowney over the years, producing his IFTA award-winning feature film Savage, and eight short films including Innocence and The Ten Steps. He has also produced two IFTA-nominated documentaries In Sunshine or in Shadow and Gualainn le Gualann (w/d – Andrew Gallimore). He is currently producing the feature film Love Eternal (w/d – Brendan Muldowney) with Morgan Bushe and Macdara Kelleher in Fastnet Films and is serving as the Irish co-producer on Simon Pummell’s transmedia project Brand New-U and is now in advanced development on Muldowney’s next project Pilgrimage.

Conor co-founded SP Films, an award winning Dublin-based film production company, with Brendan Muldowney, with the aim of developing and producing feature films for an international audience.

Niamh Creely caught up with Conor just before he headed off to Cannes as this year’s Irish Producer on the Move.

 

You must be very pleased to be selected as one of the 25 Producers on the Move at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.

 

Yes. Producers on the Move is obviously a great brand and it gives me a tremendous opportunity to pitch some of the projects I’m involved with and also to get to hear about the projects all those other Producers on the Move have as well.

 

I was reading what it entails and it sounds great –lots of networking and also getting a chance to meet Producers on the Move from previous years.

 

Yes, and I know for a fact that an awful lot of Producers on the Move end up working together and that is again a great opportunity to put the projects in the shop window.

 

How does the selection process work?

 

I think in each country the film board or whatever selects a particular producer, and I was lucky enough to be selected by the Irish Film Board this year.

 

I read that it has to be someone who has done some work on an international film already.

 

Love Eternal was a co-production with Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Ireland and Japan and also we’ve just finished shooting another co-production with the UK and the Netherlands, Brand New-U, directed by Simon Pummell.

 

Love Eternal is based on a novel and directed by Brendan Muldowney – can you tell us a little about it? I see you’re working with Fastnet Films – how did that connection come about?

 

Love Eternal is a Fastnet Films project. Macdara Kelleher, the MD of Fastnet, was at the Cannes Film Festival in 2007 and he came across a treatment of a novel by a Japanese author Kei Ôishi called Loving The Dead. The book is quite dark but has a heart to it and he contacted both of us in relation to that. We loved the material and have been developing it since 2008.

 

I noticed that the Dutch production company Rinkel Film, who worked with Fastnet Films on The Other Side of Sleep, are involved with Love Eternal – is that how that connection came about?

 

Funnily enough the Producer on the Move in 2008 was Macdara Kelleher and Reinier Selen of Rinkel Film was the Dutch Producer on the Move in the same year  – and out of that came a project Nothing Personal, which was led by Rinkel Film, and that was the start of a relationship on several projects between Fastnet Films and Rinkel Film – Nothing Personal,  The Other Side of Sleep and Love Eternal. Coincidentally Brand New-U, which is done through SP Films – myself and Brendan’s company – our Dutch co-producer on that is Rinkel Film. So there’s connections there alright!

 

You also attended the EAVE 2010 European Producers Workshop and the ACE Producers Network as well – so you’ve been using all these opportunities that have arisen.

 

Totally. In this day and age your natural networks are probably the most important thing. You just can’t finance a film through one country or through one partner;  you need multiple partners – and EAVE 2010 and ACE and, to a certain extent hopefully Producers on the Move allow producers to be able to engage with talent in each other’s countries in a very natural manner. The whole purpose of EAVE and ACE is to get to know people over a period of time and it becomes a very natural process rather than  just showing each other projects or becoming  attached to one or just looking for advice. It gets rid of all those borders… in your headspace anyway.

 

Making it more of a human connection…

 

Yes.

 

You’ve had a long-term creative partnership with Brendan Muldowney. How did that begin?

 

We were in film school together, doing the degree in Dún Laoghaire College  IADT now. His graduate short film was called The Church of Acceptance and that was screened at the Clermont-Ferrand International Short Film Festival a very prestigious festival and we just kicked on from there doing a number of short films together and moving on into features with Savage.

 

For people who want to get into film would you say your route was ‘textbook’ – going to college; making short films…

 

You know, I hate reducing it to a game but sometimes it’s like Snakes and Ladders – and I’ve definitely never taken the elevator; it’s always one step at a time. It’s what I would call a well-worn traditional path – doing a Filmbase course, or some film-related course, using that to get a portfolio together to allow you to get into film school, then making a graduate film, and then using that film to get into festivals and then kicking on in terms of various different short-film funding awards and then gradually developing into features – very much one step at a time. It’s good to know that there is some sort of a route out there – but it’s a long-term route and a lot of work.

 

So what’s the plan for Cannes?

 

I’ll be there from the 17th to the 22nd with John Keville, my producing partner at SP Films  and as usual we will be pushing the projects we have and also keeping our ears open for anyone who’s looking to speak to us about other projects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Conor Barry among Producers on the Move at Cannes

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Irish Producer Conor Barry has been named among this year’s Producers on the Move programme, which is now in its 14th year at the film festival in Cannes.

29 producers from 29 different European countries will take part in the event from 18 to 21 May, 2013. Financial support for the project, which sees new trans-national co-productions being developed each year, comes from the MEDIA Programme of the European Union and the participating EFP member organisations.

Barry graduated from the IADT in Dun Laoghaire (the National Film School). He has worked very closely with the writer/director – Brendan Muldowney over the years, producing his IFTA award-winning feature film SAVAGE, and eight short films including INNOCENCE and THE TEN STEPS. He has also produced two IFTA nominated documentaries IN SUNSHINE OR IN SHADOW and GUALAINN LE GUALAINN (w/d – Andrew Gallimore). He is currently producing the feature film LOVE ETERNAL (w/d – Brendan Muldowney) with Morgan Bushe and Macdara Kelleher in Fastnet Films. He attended EAVE 2010 and ACE21.

Barry co-founded SP Films, an award winning Dublin-based film production company, with Brendan Muldowney, with the aim of developing and producing feature films for an international audience.

Scheduled during the Cannes International Film Festival, the programme provides its participants with an additional visibility they get at this melting pot for filmmakers, sales agents, financiers and the international media. Producers on the Move’s schedule with pitching sessions, one-on-one speed-dating meetings and various opportunities to build up business relationships and to exchange knowledge enables the selected filmmakers to return home with advanced film projects and, sometimes, with a co-production deal. At the Producers’ Lunch, they can, moreover, get in contact with participants from previous years.

The emerging and independently working producers are selected by EFP member organisations from the respective countries. The participants have already realized joint European film projects which were noticed on the international radar, but they still are on their way to becoming international players. Many of them produced feature films as well as documentaries, and some are additionally active in the field of animation films.

For the fourth time, EFP will be cooperating for Producers on the Move with the pan-European co-production fund Eurimages.

 

The full list for this year’s programme can be found here

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'Savage' Available for Rental on DVD

Brendan Muldowney’s debut feature, Savage, is now available for rental on DVD in Ireland and the UK via High Fliers Films. It will also be available to purchase on DVD from 14th March.

Savage, starring Darren Healy (Eamon, Once) and Nora-Jane Noone (The Descent, The Magdalene Sisters), is an exploration of violence and masculinity – a story of obsession and revenge, as a man tries to come to terms with a brutal, random attack and its consequences.

Savage was produced by Conor Barry for SP Films and funded by the Irish Film Board.

 Visit the film’s official sites on facebook and www.savage-the-movie.com

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Galway Film Centre – The Path to Distribution Seminar

The Path to Distribution

Making a feature length film takes a long time, sometimes years. When the film is completed however, the journey is just beginning. The road to successful distribution of your film is difficult and many films don’t complete this step. A panel of industry experts will discuss film distribution in Ireland, looking at the type of work being distributed, securing distribution abroad, current trends and the importance of festivals. These are:

  • Conor Barry, Producer of Savage
  • Siobhán Farrell, Eclipse Pictures
  • Felim McDermott, Former Artistic Director, Galway Film Fleadh
  • Audrey Shiels, Element Distribution

Dates: 11am to 1pm, Thursday, 9th December 2010
Course Fee: €5. Places are limited so reservation is necessary.
Venue: The Studio, The Town Hall Theatre, Galway City
Contact: Mary at education@galwayfilmcentre.ie or phone 091-770748 for more information.

www.galwayfilmcentre.com

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Short Horror Films at Exchange Arts Centre Sat Nov 20th

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A free literary reading and screening of short horror films will take place this Saturday, 20th November at 9pm at the Exchange Arts Centre, Exchange Street Upper in Temple Bar.

The evening will begin with a reading at 9pm of the Dublin-born 19th-century author Sheridan Le Fanu’s celebrated novella ‘Carmilla’, the fictional story that invented the female vampire as a literary character (later to become so popular with filmmakers and cinema audiences). Set in central Europe, this story was to greatly influence another Dublin-born author, Bram Stoker, in the writing of his novel ‘Dracula’ and also served as the basis for several 20th-century films, including Hammer’s The Vampire Lovers (1970), Roger Vadim’s Blood and Roses (1960), Danish director Carl Theodor Dreyer’s Vampyr (1932) and Harry Kümel’s Daughters of Darkness (1970).

The ‘Gothic literature’ reading will be followed (from approx 10pm or so, until 11pm closing) by the screening of a programme of horror/chiller short films, as another part of the same ongoing inaugural festival of horrors (soon to draw to a close for this year).

This programme will consist entirely of shorts chosen to suit the horror/chiller theme of this new festival and will include several short films directed by Brendan Muldowney and produced by Conor Barry for SP Films including ‘The Ten Steps’, ‘Innocence’, ‘The Honourable Scaffolder’, ‘Beauty Queen’ and ‘Final Journey‘. Other filmmakers’ shorts to be screened at this event will include the recent documentary ‘Fear’ (dir Conor Horgan – 2009; running time 25 mins approx), Irish narrative shorts ‘Vale Road’ (dir Glenda Cimino), ‘Th3 Room’ (dir Sean Breathnach), ‘Death Is Red’ (dir Gerry Wade), ‘The Hollow Girl’ (Dave McCabe) and ‘Circus Porcalina’ (dir Aaron O’Reilly) and the brand new music video ‘Taking Lives’ by Irish band Zombie Cops (dir Eoin Heaney).

Glenda Cimino’s lengthy first short ‘Vale Road’ won third prize in the ‘Clontarf Bram Stoker Horror Film Competition’ that was held at the end of October at Clontarf Castle Hotel. Its large cast included Conor Drum, Tommy O’Neill, Phyllis Carty, Seamus Whelan, Ian Walsh, Kathy Kavanagh, Jason Nelson, Siobhan Hearty and the late Rhiannon Lee Doyle (who sadly passed away shortly after filming ended in 2007).

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SAVAGE – Special Mention at Leeds International Film Festival

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Brendan Muldowney’s debut feature ‘Savage’ picked up a Special Mention in the Méliès Competition at the recent Leeds International Film Festival, see here.

The jury commented that SAVAGE was “a brutal, powerful and brave piece of filmmaking with an impressive central performance at the heart of it”.

In December ‘Savage’ will be screening at the upcoming Capital Irish Film Festival (CIFF) in Washington DC, for more details click here.

‘Savage’, starring Darren Healy (’Eamon’, ‘Once’) and Nora-Jane Noone (’The Descent’, ‘The Magdalene Sisters’), is an exploration of violence and masculinity – a story of obsession and revenge, as a man tries to come to terms with a brutal, random attack and its consequences. It was produced by Conor Barry for SP Films and funded by the Irish Film Board.

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Savage-The-Movie/339916004056

http://www.savage-the-movie.com/

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Issue 128 – You Won't Be Able To Look Away

Ross Whitaker talks to Brendan Muldowney and Conor Barry about their low-budget feature Savage.

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I don’t mind telling you that I was a little worried when Film Ireland asked me to put the spotlight on Savage, the debut feature film by Brendan Muldowney (director) and Conor Barry (producer).

With low-budget Irish films you just never know what you’re going to get and I hadn’t seen the film yet. In fact, nobody had seen it. Ever. So I was concerned that I was going to end up interviewing the makers of Savage without having enjoyed their film…

They sent me over a screener. I watched it. I loved it. I was the first person to watch the final cut of the film and now the makers of Savage have a 100% record. One viewer, one fan.

Savage is an exploration of violence and masculinity – a story of obsession and revenge, as a man tries to come to terms with a brutal, random attack and its consequences.

Darren Healy plays Paul Graynor, a shy, mild-mannered press photographer who is set upon in an alley by two lads on his way home from a night out. In a hugely powerful scene, Muldowney brilliantly captures the intimidating ‘Look at me! Look at me! Watcha lookin’ at?’ patter that will be all too familiar to anyone who has been caught in that frightening position. It’s an uncomfortable, harrowing scene that will have you squirming in your seat and the gentlemen in the audience crossing their legs. But you won’t be able to look away.

The violent assault leaves Graynor a shadow of his former self, at first cowed but later very, very angry. Muldowney is clearly influenced by films like Taxi Driver and Straw Dogs in depicting a man who is pushed to the edge and contemplates taking the 
next step.

Uncompromising
The film takes you on a visceral, violent journey that is utterly compelling. It’s not for the faint-hearted but then it’s not aimed at the faint-hearted. Indeed, probably the most pleasing element of this film is its unflinching desire to not let the audience off the hook. It is uncompromising but all the better for that. It puts the audience in an uncomfortable but fascinating place, leaving you wondering whether revenge could be acceptable if the initial crime is heinous enough.

‘I wanted to make people feel something and then they could make up their own minds about it,’ says Muldowney. ‘I wanted the audience to understand this character and to almost feel sorry for him despite the violent acts that he carries out. It’s a bit twisted. The whole point was to put the audience in this grey area, so they could see both sides of the story. I was happy to not be didactic.’

While it’s difficult to pinpoint the exact budget of Savage, it seems to me that they received less cash in hand than is often wasted on an hour of prime-time reality TV. They had just four weeks to shoot the film and ended up with less coverage than they would have liked, though I must admit that I didn’t notice. Barry and Muldowney are also quick to point out that their low budget brought benefits as well as drawbacks.

‘If we’d had more money, I probably would have used CGI to help me depict the violence and bloodshed in certain scenes but in hindsight it became more about performance and using the length of the scene to get me there. I think it works just as well and that it’s just as disturbing and if we’d been more explicit it might not have been as good,’ says Muldowney. Barry adds a crucial point, ‘the other thing about low-budget filmmaking is that it gave us the freedom to make the film we wanted to make.’

Barry and Muldowney originally aimed to make Savage as part of the Catalyst Project – BSÉ/IFB, BCI, TVt3 and Arts Council scheme that aimed to get three low-budget features made – but when it wasn’t picked as one of the final projects, they decided to make it anyway.

Natural progression
‘We didn’t get Catalyst but we had put so much work into it at that point, it reinforced the fact that we really wanted to make it,’ explains Barry. ‘Funnily enough, all of the work you put into trying to get a Catalyst application together, all of the encouragement and meetings and so on bring you on the road towards making your film. It all became a weird, natural progression towards achieving funding for Savage.’

They make no secret of their gratitude to BSÉ/IFB, who strongly backed the project, ‘they put together the model that allowed us to get the film made,’ says Barry. And they commend Filmbase, which was also very supportive. In addition, the team raised money outside of the normal channels by sending an investment proposal to family, friends and, well, everyone they could. It worked.

It’s quite remarkable what they’ve achieved with the budget they accumulated and there are films out there with ten times the budget that don’t look half as good. Using the RED ONE, cinematographers Michael O’Donovan and Tom Comerford have created a stark, monochrome Dublin that is gritty without appearing in any way cheap. Muldowney is clearly adept at using sound and it is employed to great effect throughout the film and, in particular, to build the internal journey of Graynor.

It’s a tribute to the BSÉ/IFB ‘can do’ attitude that so many small, high-quality films are making their way to audiences. But the flipside is that there is increasing competition for berths at festivals even within Ireland. The makers of Savage hope to debut the film at Galway and take it from there.

Beyond Savage, Barry and Muldowney have two more films loaded up and ready to go and they’re just waiting to finalise funding before pulling the trigger. I’m genuinely looking forward to seeing what they do next.

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Words from the Wise – Short Film

Tamara Anghie has been working in the film and new media industries for the past 15 years after completing a Degree in Film & Media Studies in Melbourne, Australia. She has worked in various production capacities in Australia, South-East Asia and Europe on television commercials, music videos, short and feature films as well as for computer games and new media companies. She now works as a producer for Zanzibar Films in Dublin and Make Ireland in Belfast. Read more

Conor Barry graduated in film production from DLIADT in 2000. Since then he has produced seven short films for writer/director Brendan Muldowney and SP Films, including the award winning Innocence and The Ten Steps. He also wrote the short The Honourable Scaffolder. The Irish Film Board Short Short Final Journey is the latest short he has produced for Brendan. Presently SP Films have two feature projects in development with the Irish Film Board, Soul Broke and Savage, and aTV series in development with RTÉ, The Getter. Read more

Aidan Beatty is a student, and the writer and director of two short films. Read more

Sasha King and NYC music producer Bill Snodgrass founded Princess Pictures with a slate of features, documentaries and music driven projects. Sasha’s previous productions include the Conrad Gallagher documentary for RTÉ TV, Nostradamus & Me (New Line Cinema funded and winner of Galway Film Festival 2004), Shaving the Baby, Ros, and she is producer of two IFB/RTÉ TV Short Cuts for 2005 Never Judge a Book and The Anarchic Hand Affair. Read more

Start the Short Revolution! A practical guide to short film funding. Read more

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