‘The Other Side of Sleep’ on iTunes

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Rebecca Daly’s Irish psychological thriller The Other Side of Sleep starring Screen International’s “Star of Tomorrow” Sam Keeley and Antonia Campbell Hughes is now available on iTunes in Ireland and the UK.

 Click here to view

The Other Side of Sleep is the debut feature of director Rebecca Daly. It premiered in the Cannes Directors Fortnight programme in 2011, followed by a great reception at the Galway Film Fleadh, the Toronto International Film Festival and many more as far reaching as India. The film was nominated for three IFTA awards including Best Director, Best Actress for Antonia Campbell Hughes and Best Cinematography for DoP Suzie Lavelle. Antonia was also  nominated as a shooting star at the Berlin International Film Festival 2012 for her performance in the film.

The Other Side of Sleep was produced by Irish company Fastnet Films (Colony, Kisses), and European co-producers Rinkel Film & TV Productions and KMH Film Productions. The film was funded by the IFB, the Netherlands Film Fund and Hungarian Motion Pictures Foundation.

 You can read an interview with the film’s director, Rebecca Daly, here

 

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Competition: Win a DVD of ‘The Other Side of Sleep’ by Rebecca Daly

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Thanks to the fine people at Wildcard Distribution we have 3 copies of The Other Side of Sleep to give away.

The Other Side of Sleep is the debut feature of director Rebecca Daly. It premiered in the Cannes Directors Fortnight programme in 2011, followed by a great reception at the Galway Film Fleadh, the Toronto International Film Festival and many more as far reaching as India. The film was nominated for three IFTA awards including Best Director, Best Actress for Antonia Campbell Hughes and Best Cinematography for DoP Suzie Lavelle. Antonia was also  nominated as a shooting star at the Berlin International Film Festival 2012 for her performance in the film.

The Other Side of Sleep was produced by Irish company Fastnet Films (Colony, Kisses), and European co-producers Rinkel Film & TV Productions and KMH Film Productions. The film was funded by the IFB, the Netherlands Film Fund and Hungarian Motion Pictures Foundation.

The Other Side of Sleep is available on DVD in stores including Golden Discs, Tower Records and the IFI in Ireland now and also on the Wildcard Distribution website here

 

To win yourself a copy of the DVD, simply answer the following question:

What is the name of the character Antonia Campbell Hughes plays in The Other Side of Sleep?

Send your answer to filmireland@gmail.com before 1pm Monday, 2nd December to be in with a chance of winning. The Film Ireland Hat will randomly select the winners minutes before its afternoon nap.

 You can read an interview with the film’s director, Rebecca Daly, here

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Interview: Rebecca Daly, director of ‘The Other Side of Sleep’

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The Other Side of Sleep is released today on DVD. Amanda Spencer caught up with director Rebecca Daly before her debut feature screened at the Cannes International Film Festival in 2011 to chat about the film.  

This interview originally appeared in Film Ireland Magazine. Issue 137. Summer 2011.

Sensitively directed and stunningly photographed, The Other Side of Sleep is on its way to Cannes. The film, which is Daly’s feature directorial debut, follows the success of her short films, Joyriders and Hum and is produced by Morgan Bushe and Macdara Kelleher of Fastnet Films.

Co-written with Daly’s writing partner Glenn Montgomery, the film follows Arlene, a young woman who struggles to decipher between the real and the imagined after a local murder stirs up old grief. Her sense of reality is challenged as sleep deprivation and raw emotion compete and draw her into further disarray. In the telling of a big story, Daly hasn’t forgotten small touches. It’s this light hand that makes The Other Side of Sleep a really superb debut feature and as the film wings its way to Cannes, I caught up with Rebecca.

What inspired the story for The Other Side of Sleep?

It started with a newspaper article about a young woman whose body was discovered wrapped in a duvet in a shopping centre car park in Northern Ireland. What struck me about the article was the way in which the journalist had accumulated lots of different anecdotes about the dead woman from various sources – and how these stories contradicted each other, making it impossible to establish the truth about this girl’s life.

In the earliest treatments the film’s protagonist was the dead girl but as it evolved we became interested in exploring the situation through a person unconnected to the victim. Arlene became our focus and we were looking at the various experiences of shock and grief within the story through her very particular viewpoint. I can’t remember when the sleepwalking element entered the story but this really fascinated us: that a person could be active or acted upon but not conscious – throwing up complications of responsibility – and have no memory of what happened once awake again.

Where did you meet Glenn, your writing partner? Had you written a feature together before? If not, was it a very different process?

We met studying Drama in Trinity years ago. We wrote my first short Joyriders together and had developed another very low-budget feature idea but ultimately both of us felt stronger about The Other Side of Sleep. Glenn and I have different strengths as writers, which seems to work well. Also, we have a bit of a laugh together, which can be really helpful in an intensive writing process, I think.

As the project was selected for the Cannes Résidence du Festival programme, I got to do a chunk of the writing there and then we would get together talk about structure etc., and redraft. It wasn’t often that the two of us would sit in front of the computer and try and write together, we would rather discuss and then I’d do a draft or he would – or sometimes we’d take sections. The script went through many drafts. It was a constant filtration process as we had so many ideas that we wanted to explore in the beginning that we kept having to select from or cut down – this continued to be the process through the making of the film; keeping a handle on the themes and ideas and deciding what was essential and trying to make sure I kept the audience focused on what was important.

Why was the Midlands chosen to locate the story?

My family is from the Midlands so it’s a region I am really familiar with. It has a particular atmosphere that I thought would work for the film – visually also I wanted a pretty worn look and so it was great to be able to shoot it in a region that hadn’t been too affected by the Celtic Tiger.

Thinking back, how did you view the opportunity to direct your first feature – all guns blazing or were you a little apprehensive? Did the Cannes residence programme better equip you, do you think?

I feel incredibly lucky to have been able to make this film. Of course making a feature is a pretty big leap in terms of the demands it puts on the director. It can be daunting at times, but it’s such a great opportunity. Mainly, I was really excited to be able to do it. The Résidence was a brilliant space to write the film in – really this is the main purpose of it. And I was living with five other directors, some of whom had already made their first feature, so this was inspiring in itself.

Shooting your first feature, did you feel your role as director was better supported, coming from shorts where often there isn’t as strict a division of labour?

I think that, like in shorts, in low-budget feature filmmaking the division of labour still isn’t that strict. Maybe it’s the job of the director to delineate this at times when it’s not clear. Honestly, for me one of the most difficult aspects was establishing these lines, for myself as much as anyone else – I learned a lot from this experience.

Had you worked with the key crew before?

No, actually. When I met potential crew obviously I wanted to see how they ‘got’ the script – especially how they responded to and picked up on the detail within it – as that for me is a very important aspect in the maintaining the style and also building the narrative of the film, from small textural details. I had worked with my editor, Halina Daugird, on my last short so this gave us a great shorthand when it came to the edit.

The casting for the film is really perfect. Did you get to spend ample time with the actors before shooting?

For me the actors are my key focus in making the film. The casting was pretty complicated in that the cast is a combination of five professional actors with the rest being non-professionals that we found through open castings in the area. It was important to find the right balance with them; that the acting level and pitch of the non-professional and professional actors would fit. I wanted to create a tone, a kind of naturalism and to keep in mind that in the course of the film some of the key characters are in shock. I wanted to capture that sense of helplessness, paralysis and desperation, a kind of unbearable powerlessness in their means of expression.

I made sure to have as much time with them as possible in advance of the shoot where we explored the key characters as real people with history and context and tried to find ways, particularly for the non-professional actors, to access and identify with the experience of the characters. We looked at the details of specific moments in their pasts as I thought if they could have a vivid picture of certain incidents – it could build up a kind of imagined memory for the character that they could tap in to. Antonia came down to the Midlands two weeks before the shoot – we decided that it was important for her to immerse herself in the world, so she effectively lived as Arlene for the two weeks prior to the shoot. With Arlene it was important to find her way of expressing herself as a product of her past and her lack of understanding of it.

The film is funded from a few different sources, which is increasingly common. What was your experience of that?

I’m not sure how it would be possible to fund this budget level without the mechanism of co-production. It seems to work really well. Also, it meant we worked with some key personnel from the co-production countries which I think was a great experience for everyone.

Is there a scene that is particularly special for you? Why?

My favourite scenes are towards the end of the film – so I probably shouldn’t spoil them… One that stands out for me is the scene in which Arlene works late in the factory and she is disturbed by Bill. I really like what her laughter does here in terms of contrast within her character and also what it does to the tension of the film. People watching the film usually laugh at this point, which is kind of strange in the context of the whole film. I like that.

Are you working on other scripts? What’s next for you?

I’m researching a couple of books that I am interested in adapting for the screen plus Glenn and I have a few ideas that we are discussing. I really want to find something that hooks me like The Other Side of Sleep did – it takes so long to make a film that the challenge is to still be interested in it by the end of the process.

Amanda Spencer

This interview originally appeared in Film Ireland 137 Summer 2011.

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Film Ireland 137 Summer 2011: Interview with Rebecca Daly

With The Other Side of Sleep going on release from March 15th, Film Ireland’s Amanda Spencer caught up with director Rebecca Daly before her debut feature screened at the Cannes International Film Festival in 2011.  This interview originally appeared in Film Ireland 137 Summer 2011.

 

 

Sensitively directed and stunningly photographed, The Other Side of Sleep is on its way to Cannes. The film, which is Daly’s feature directorial debut, follows the success of her short films, Joyriders and Hum and is produced by Morgan Bushe and Macdara Kelleher of Fastnet Films.

 

Co-written with Daly’s writing partner Glenn Montgomery, the film follows Arlene, a young woman who struggles to decipher between the real and the imagined after a local murder stirs up old grief. Her sense of reality is challenged as sleep deprivation and raw emotion compete and draw her into further disarray. In the telling of a big story, Daly hasn’t forgotten small touches. It’s this light hand that makes The Other Side of Sleep a really superb debut feature and as the film wings its way to Cannes, I caught up with Rebecca.

 

What inspired the story for The Other Side of Sleep?

 

It started with a newspaper article about a young woman whose body was discovered wrapped in a duvet in a shopping centre car park in Northern Ireland. What struck me about the article was the way in which the journalist had accumulated lots of different anecdotes about the dead woman from various sources – and how these stories contradicted each other, making it impossible to establish the truth about this girl’s life.

 

In the earliest treatments the film’s protagonist was the dead girl but as it evolved we became interested in exploring the situation through a person unconnected to the victim. Arlene became our focus and we were looking at the various experiences of shock and grief within the story through her very particular viewpoint. I can’t remember when the sleepwalking element entered the story but this really fascinated us: that a person could be active or acted upon but not conscious – throwing up complications of responsibility – and have no memory of what happened once awake again.

 

Where did you meet Glenn, your writing partner? Had you written a feature together before? If not, was it a very different process?

 

We met studying Drama in Trinity years ago. We wrote my first short Joyriders together and had developed another very low-budget feature idea but ultimately both of us felt stronger about The Other Side of Sleep. Glenn and I have different strengths as writers, which seems to work well. Also, we have a bit of a laugh together, which can be really helpful in an intensive writing process, I think.

As the project was selected for the Cannes Résidence du Festival programme, I got to do a chunk of the writing there and then we would get together talk about structure etc., and redraft. It wasn’t often that the two of us would sit in front of the computer and try and write together, we would rather discuss and then I’d do a draft or he would – or sometimes we’d take sections. The script went through many drafts. It was a constant filtration process as we had so many ideas that we wanted to explore in the beginning that we kept having to select from or cut down – this continued to be the process through the making of the film; keeping a handle on the themes and ideas and deciding what was essential and trying to make sure I kept the audience focused on what was important.

 

 

Why was the Midlands chosen to locate the story?

 

My family is from the Midlands so it’s a region I am really familiar with. It has a particular atmosphere that I thought would work for the film – visually also I wanted a pretty worn look and so it was great to be able to shoot it in a region that hadn’t been too affected by the Celtic Tiger.

 

 

Thinking back, how did you view the opportunity to direct your first feature – all guns blazing or were you a little apprehensive? Did the Cannes residence programme better equip you, do you think?

 

I feel incredibly lucky to have been able to make this film. Of course making a feature is a pretty big leap in terms of the demands it puts on the director. It can be daunting at times, but it’s such a great opportunity. Mainly, I was really excited to be able to do it. The Résidence was a brilliant space to write the film in – really this is the main purpose of it. And I was living with five other directors, some of whom had already made their first feature, so this was inspiring in itself.

 

Shooting your first feature, did you feel your role as director was better supported, coming from shorts where often there isn’t as strict a division of labour?

 

I think that, like in shorts, in low-budget feature filmmaking the division of labour still isn’t that strict. Maybe it’s the job of the director to delineate this at times when it’s not clear. Honestly, for me one of the most difficult aspects was establishing these lines, for myself as much as anyone else – I learned a lot from this experience.

 

Had you worked with the key crew before?

 

No, actually. When I met potential crew obviously I wanted to see how they ‘got’ the script – especially how they responded to and picked up on the detail within it – as that for me is a very important aspect in the maintaining the style and also building the narrative of the film, from small textural details. I had worked with my editor, Halina Daugird, on my last short so this gave us a great shorthand when it came to the edit.

 

The casting for the film is really perfect. Did you get to spend ample time with the actors before shooting?

 

For me the actors are my key focus in making the film. The casting was pretty complicated in that the cast is a combination of five professional actors with the rest being non-professionals that we found through open castings in the area. It was important to find the right balance with them; that the acting level and pitch of the non-professional and professional actors would fit. I wanted to create a tone, a kind of naturalism and to keep in mind that in the course of the film some of the key characters are in shock. I wanted to capture that sense of helplessness, paralysis and desperation, a kind of unbearable powerlessness in their means of expression.

I made sure to have as much time with them as possible in advance of the shoot where we explored the key characters as real people with history and context and tried to find ways, particularly for the non-professional actors, to access and identify with the experience of the characters. We looked at the details of specific moments in their pasts as I thought if they could have a vivid picture of certain incidents – it could build up a kind of imagined memory for the character that they could tap in to. Antonia came down to the Midlands two weeks before the shoot – we decided that it was important for her to immerse herself in the world, so she effectively lived as Arlene for the two weeks prior to the shoot. With Arlene it was important to find her way of expressing herself as a product of her past and her lack of understanding of it.

 

The film is funded from a few different sources, which is increasingly common. What was your experience of that?

 

I’m not sure how it would be possible to fund this budget level without the mechanism of co-production. It seems to work really well. Also, it meant we worked with some key personnel from the co-production countries which I think was a great experience for everyone.

 

Is there a scene that is particularly special for you? Why?

 

My favourite scenes are towards the end of the film – so I probably shouldn’t spoil them… One that stands out for me is the scene in which Arlene works late in the factory and she is disturbed by Bill. I really like what her laughter does here in terms of contrast within her character and also what it does to the tension of the film. People watching the film usually laugh at this point, which is kind of strange in the context of the whole film. I like that.

 

Are you working on other scripts? What’s next for you?

 

I’m researching a couple of books that I am interested in adapting for the screen plus Glenn and I have a few ideas that we are discussing. I really want to find something that hooks me like The Other Side of Sleep did – it takes so long to make a film that the challenge is to still be interested in it by the end of the process.

Amanda Spencer

This interview originally appeared in Film Ireland 137 Summer 2011.

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Rebecca Daly’s ‘The Other Side of Sleep’ goes on cinema release

 

The Other Side of Sleep, the directorial debut by Irish filmmaker Rebecca Daly is released in selected cinemas nationwide 16th March  with previews in the IFI Dublin on 15th March .

The Other Side of Sleep is an acclaimed debut feature by Irish filmmaker Rebecca Daly that features a powerful and compelling performance from Antonia Campbell-Hughes, one of this year’s Berlin International Film Festival’s Shooting Stars award recipients.

This hotly-anticipated suspense drama made history at its World Premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in 2011 as it was the first film directed by an Irish woman to be selected for inclusion in the Festival. The film, produced by Fastnet Films, also screened in competition at the Toronto International Film Festival and was nominated for Best Director, Best Actress and Best Cinematography at the Irish Film and Television Awards.

A sleepwalker since childhood, Arlene works in the local factory of the small Irish rural town she grew up in. When a young woman is found dead in the woods, echoes of the past inexorably draw Arlene towards the tragedy. She becomes close to the victim’s grieving sister (Vicky Joyce) and family while at the same time finding herself entangled with the woman’s teenage lover (newcomer Sam Keeley) also the main suspect in the murder.   Barricading herself in at night, afraid to sleep, Arlene’s sleeping and waking realities soon blur, as the community searches for someone to blame..

Film Ireland’s Amanda Spencer talks to director Rebecca Daly in Film Ireland 137 Summer 2011.

Follow The Other Side of Sleep on Facebook.

On Twitter  @SideOfSleep

 

Dublin: The Irish Film Institute 15th – 29th March
  Cineworld 16th – 22nd March
     
Cork Triskel Cinema 18th – 22nd March
     
Galway Eye Cinema 16th – 22nd March
     
Letterkenny Century Cinema 16th – 22nd March
     
Offaly Birr Theatre 16th & 17th March @ 20:00pm
 
Belfast Queens Film Theatre 13th – 16th April
 
Leitrim Carrick Cinemplex 20th – 26th April
 

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Rebecca Daly’s new Irish feature ‘The Other Side of Sleep’, starring Antonia Cambell-Hughes to be released nationwide from 16th March 2012

The Other Side of Sleep is an acclaimed debut feature by Irish filmmaker Rebecca Daly that features a powerful and compelling performance from Antonia Campbell-Hughes, one of this year’s Berlin International Film Festival’s Shooting Stars award recipients. This hotly-anticipated suspense drama made history at its World Premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in 2011 as it was the first film directed by an Irish woman to be selected for inclusion in the Festival. The film, produced by Fastnet Films, also screened at the Toronto International Film Festival and was nominated for Best Director and Best Actress at the Irish Film and Television Awards.

A sleepwalker since childhood, Arlene works in the local factory of the small Irish rural town she grew up in. When a young woman is found dead in the woods, Arlene is forced to her confront a tragedy from her own childhood. Echoes of the past inexorably draw Arlene towards the tragedy; she becomes close to the victim’s grieving sister (Vicky Joyce) and family while at the same time finding herself entangled with the woman’s lover (newcomer Sam Keeley) and the case’s main suspect. Deprived of sleep and having to barricade herself in at night, Arlene’s sleepwalking and waking reality start to blur as the community searches for someone to blame.

The Other Side of Sleep is Rebecca Daly’s first feature, having come to prominence with the success of her short film Joyriders that picked up Best Irish Short at the Galway Film Fleadh and a Best Short IFTA. Her follow-up short Hum was selected as one of the finalists for the Berlin Today Award in 2010. Inspired by real-life disappearances she read about in the media and memories of her home town’s reaction to a similar tragedy when she was a teenager, Daly creates a unique narrative that captures the trauma of loss, the discovery of vulnerability, and the haunting image of a life frozen in time. The film also provides a sensitive artistic juxtaposition to the sometimes lurid media interest in murders and abductions.

Director Rebecca Daly said ‘With The Other Side of Sleep, I wanted to make a film that got under the skin of a thriller, that looked at grief and loss as confusing, haunting, terrifying. I wanted to get at that feeling of walking down a deserted road at night and suddenly becoming aware of your exposure, your vulnerability.

Leading a fantastic ensemble cast in The Other Side of Sleep, as well as being named one of Berlin International Film Festival’s Shooting Stars, Antonia Campbell-Hughes’ career is at a high point. After her success in Jack Dee’s TV comedy Lead Balloon, the former international fashion designer went on to create her own show Bluebell Welch for MTV as well as being cast in Jane Campion’s Bright Star (2009). This year she stars in another upcoming cinema release, Lotus Eaters. Other key cast members include two veteran Irish actresses of stage and screen, Olwen Fouere and Cathy Belton, as well as hot newcomer Sam Keeley who after being selected at an open casting for The Other Side of Sleep, has gone on to star in RTE series RAW as well as Lenny Abrahamson’s forthcoming film What Richard Did.

The Other Side of Sleep is released nationwide from 16th March 2012. There will be a gala preview of the film at 6.20pm on 15th March at the IFI in Dublin followed by a public interview with director Rebecca Daly.

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Antonia Campbell-Hughes named among Shooting Stars 2012

Antonia Campbell-Hughes (The Other Side of Sleep) has been named among the ten young, talented, European actors chosen as SHOOTING STARS 2012 – Europe’s best young actors are all of this and even more: With their outstanding work in feature films they have proven themselves ready to expand their film careers beyond their home countries to the world’s screens. From February 11 to 13, European Film Promotion (EFP) will showcase these newcomers from around Europe at the 62nd Berlin International Film Festival, running 9 – 19 February, 2012. EFP member organisations had nominated 23 candidates for final selection by the jury of internationally established film industry professionals. SHOOTING STARS is part of EFP’s annual programme that is financially supported by the MEDIA Programme of the European Union and the participating EFP member organisations.

Now in its 15th year the annual event at the Berlinale supports and champions young European actors with the aim of providing them with professional contacts to take the next big leap in their international careers. The showcase culminates in a glittering award ceremony at the Berlinale Palast where the talent will be honoured with the SHOOTING STARS AWARD – donated by TESiRO. After their introduction at the Berlinale, the SHOOTING STARS’ participants will continue to demonstrate the richness of European cinema internationally at festivals and film events around the globe. With this mandate they follow in the footsteps of former SHOOTING STARS such as Carey Mulligan, Moritz Bleibtreu, Mélanie Laurent, Alba Rohrwacher, Domhnall Gleeson and Elena Anaya.

Dutch Oscar-winning director Marleen Gorris, member of the SHOOTING STARS jury, commented: “The films were a real pleasure to watch. We came away marvelling at the often brilliant way the nominated actors portrayed the feeling of a kind of modern loneliness, taking you on a journey in their search for identity no matter which part of Europe they came from. It was a real challenge choosing our ten favourites from such an interesting and high-quality group of nominees.”

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Rebecca Daly’s ‘The Other Side of Sleep’ screens at European Union Film Festival in Toronto

Rebecca Daly’s The Other Side of Sleep will be shown at this year’s European Union Film Festival in Toronto.

The film will screen Tuesday on 29 Nov at the Royal Cinema, 608 College Street.

The film festival’s website is www.eutorontofilmfest.ca

The Other Side of Sleep

A sleepwalker. A body. A family. A small community.

Arlene is like a ghost in her life. She lives in a small town in the midlands – surrounded by field after field, woodlands and laneways to disappear down and never come back…

One morning Arlene wakes in the woods beside the body of a young woman. Someone watches from the trees.  The body is soon discovered and suspicion spreads through the community. Increasingly drawn to the girl’s family – her grieving sister and accused boyfriend, Arlene barricades herself in at night, afraid to sleep. Haunted by grief buried and delayed, Arlene’s sleeping and waking realities soon blur. And all this time someone is watching her.

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