Natasha Waugh, Director of ‘Mother’

Natasha Waugh’s latest short film, Mother, screens at this year’s Cork Film Festival. In the film, hardworking mam Grace, played by Hilary Rose, has the perfect happy family: a loving husband and two wonderful children. But when her husband arrives home one day with a brand new kitchen appliance, she slowly starts to realize that there might not be room for both of them in this house.

Gemma Creagh sat down with Natasha to find out more about her quirky short, her journey into film and her IFTA-nominated 2016 film Terminal.

 

 

Mother screens at Cork Film Festival 2018 as part of Irish Shorts 2 – Flesh and Blood at 14:45 on 11th November 2018 at The Gate Cinema.

 

Tickets

 

 

Terminal

 

Natasha Waugh co-founded Fight Back Films in 2013, and has, to date, directed four short films (Food Fight, Running Commentary, Lag, and Terminal) and co-directed another (The Betrayal) with filmmaker Kamila Dydyna. The films have enjoyed success on the festival circuit.

Terminal, inspired by the women affected by the 8th amendment, has gone on to critical acclaim, winning Best Short Film at Indie Cork 2016, Director’s Choice Short Film at the 2017 Irish Film Festival, Boston, the Writers Guild of Ireland Zebbie Award for Best Short Film Script, 2017, and Best Irish Short Film at the 2017 Dub Web Fest.

Terminal has received other nominations for Best Short Film at the Dublin Feminist Film Festival, Irish Film Festival London, Fort Worth Indie Showcase, and played in competition at Manchester International Film Festival 2017. Terminal picked up other prestigious nominations for Best Short film at the 37th London Film Critics’ Circle Awards, and at the 2017 Irish Film & Television Academy Awards (IFTAs).

Natasha’s latest film, Mother, premiered at the 30th Galway Film Fleadh 2018 and screens at Cork Film Festival 2018.

 

Running Commentary

 

 

 

http://filmireland.net/2018/10/18/irish-film-preview-2018-cork-film-festival/

 

 

Film Ireland Podcasts

Share

‘Terminal’ Receives Nomination @ London Critics Circle Film Awards

DSC_2079-ps1-300x176-300x176

 

Irish short film Terminal has been nominated by the London Critics Circle for Best Short Film. The film sees two women meet at an airport departure terminal, waiting to board a plane to Manchester in order to seek safe and legal abortion. Terminal is one of five short films nominated this year for the award. The previous winner was Irish short film Stutterer, which went on to win an Academy Award.

The film, written and directed by Natasha Waugh (Fight Back Films), shines a spotlight on the bodily rights of women in Ireland. The film aims to humanise women who face criminal charges for seeking abortions in Ireland, and who therefore travel abroad to have the procedure.

Terminal won Best Irish Short Film at this year’s Indie Cork Film and Music Festival, and has gone on to receive numerous nominations from other festivals, including the Irish Film Festival London, and the Dublin Feminist Film Festival. The film has had further success at film festivals in Ireland and the UK, with positive responses at the London Feminist Film Festival in August 2016, and the Kerry Film Festival, 2016.

Terminal was produced by David C. Lynch (Hopehapp Productions), in association with Driftwood Doll Films. The film stars Andrea Kelly, (Lenny Abrahamson’s Prosperity, and Rebecca Daly’s Joyriders), and newcomer Aoife Doyle.

The London Critics’ Circle Film Awards will be held on January 22nd, in London. For more information on the film’s cast and crew, visit www.fightbackfilms.come/terminal/, and keep up to date with the film’s latest news, on Terminal’s twitter and Facebook page.

Share

‘Terminal’ @ Galway Fringe

DSC_2079-ps1-300x176

Natasha Waugh’s short film Terminal screens at the Galway Fringe as part of the SHORTS PROGRAMME 1 – Let the Shorts Begin on 9th July 2:00 pm4:00 pm. 

Terminal is about a girl and a woman who meet in an airport departure gate. Just before they board a plane to Manchester to get abortions, we witness a private exchange as they share the different reasons that brought them to this moment, and the traumatic journey that awaits them.

 

SHORTS PROGRAMME 1

In The Valley of the Moon (Dir. Brian Rossney)

Proclaim (Dir.Maureen O’Connell)

Contact (Dir. Stephen Brady)

Girls (Dir. Maureen O’Connell)

Amhras (Dir. Sean Wrenn)

Terminal (Dir. Natasha Waugh)

Reflections (Dir. Chris Ozminski)

My Bonnie (Dir. Hannah Quinn)

Kiss Heist  (Dir. Kevin Glynn)

 

Share

Short Film on Women’s Bodily Rights In Ireland Wraps

 

DSC_2079 ps1

Dublin based independent film companies Fight Back Films, and Hopehapp Productions, in association with Driftwood Doll Films, present Terminal. The film aims to humanise women who face criminal charges for seeking abortions in Ireland, and who therefore travel abroad to have the procedure.

The film is written and directed by up and coming filmmaker Natasha Waugh (Fight Back Films), and produced by David C. Lynch of Hopehapp Productions.

Terminal is about a girl and a woman who meet in an airport departure gate. Just before they board a plane to Manchester to get abortions, we witness a private exchange as they share the different reasons that brought them to this moment, and the traumatic journey that awaits them.

The film was shot over three days on March 4th, 5th and 6th, by a crew including Director of Photography Eimear Ennis-Graham (Shem The Penman Sings AgainToday), Producer David C. Lynch (After; Says; Stay) Writer/Director Natasha Waugh (Food Fight; Running Commentary), and Sound Recordist Dean Murray, (Soulsmith, Late Arrivals). 

The film stars Andrea Kelly, (Lenny Abrahamson’s Prosperity, and Rebecca Daly’s Joyriders.), and Aoife Doyle, a newcomer who has done extensive extra in various productions including the RTE production Whistleblower Moone Boy, Cracks, and Vikings, and was the back up body double for Saoirse Ronan in Neil Jordan’s Byzantium.

Terminal is currently starting post-production and will begin the edit within the next few weeks before entering the festival circuit.

Share

IFI Ireland on Sunday Interview: Tadhg O’Sullivan

What-REmains-1-MED-300x238

To coincide with the release of his documentary The Great Wall, Tadhg O’Sullivan, in conversation with Michael Ryan, will present two of his previous works, Bow Street [2010] and What Remains [2013], together with an excerpt from Terminal, a work in progress. The idea behind the screenings is to show and talk about the work that developed a lot of the styles that O’Sullivan brought to bear on The Great Wall. O’Sullivan explains that “these three films have aspects of different filmmaking approaches that are used in The Great Wall. So there’s a kind of evolutionary arc in it. It’s not that one leads to the other but just different approaches and different styles I have used over the years.”

All the works are very much infused with a sense of people and place. With Bow Street one single street becomes a theatre awash with human lives. O’Sullivan tells me that there were two starting points for the film. “One was the idea of relationship between people and place. The built environment and urban architecture and how people relate to that and how sometimes real people can get lost in the milieu around urban architecture. We tend, in an urban environment, not to see real people and the idea of the film was just to stop and shoot over the course of a month and explore that idea by slowing down and looking and watching and meeting people in a way that explores the relationship between the built environment and the human lives that operate within it.

“The other starting point for the film was for myself. As a filmmaker who hadn’t made many films, I had lots of ideas about exploring these kinds of ideas in exotic places like Palestine and West Africa. Part of me just felt that if I couldn’t make a film on a single street then I was wasting my time. So it was a challenge to me  almost taking Lars von Trier’s The Five Obstructions and using that idea of giving yourself a set of rules and exploring your own abilities as a filmmaker. The simple rule was shoot everything outside on one street and see if I could make something that is engaging and interesting and human and actually manages to explore those bigger ideas of the relationship between people and place and urban architecture.”

In the film people wander in and out of the narrative rather than ever becoming the focus of the narrative itself, something that reflects O’Sullivan’s interest in how the content of film can explore the ideas behind it. “The idea behind the film is the anonymity of life in an urban context, in a public urban context, and the anonymity of people just passing through and fleetingly meeting each other. That is very much manifest in the film. People come, people go, people are introduced, they leave and they are never seen again. We don’t find out their names. We don’t find out really much about them but we have these kind of exchanges and engagements with them. That’s a way of representing and exploring that aspect of urban life  where it is all about temporary fleeting moments with people. The city remains the same; the people move within it.”

What Remains, co-directed with Pat Collins, uses a selection of IFI archive material from the personal collections of Irish families to create an evocative examination of memory. According to O’Sullivan, the film started “as something Pat wanted to do. We had worked together a lot prior to this film and it touches on many of Pat’s central concerns to do with people and place, and shared cultural memory. I’ve worked a lot with archive over the years and it is something that’s really important to me. There is a magic to working with archive and there’s a  particular approach where you are looking for subtle hidden layers and meanings in material that was shot for an entirely different reason. And it’s just the everyday stuff of life, the incidental moments that have a poetry hidden within them. Trawling through the amazing material that is held at the IFI archive you find all these bits of film that were shot as recordings, memories, memories to be held, photographs of family members or holidays. They were shot with one thing in mind. Yet over time they gain other layers which are to do with a kind of melancholy of the passing of time and the idea that people have gone. But also there is an aesthetic and poetic element in them that myself and Pat as filmmakers were very much drawn to. The incidental things within the frames that might not have been apparent to the people who shot them but can be found within them. That is what made What Remains such an interesting film to work on. While I have worked with archive a lot, as I say, this was devoting ourselves to just working with that kind of fragmented poetry of hidden meaning and hidden layers within old material. I have to say it was one of the most enjoyable edits I have ever undertaken for that reason. There is something very free and very beautiful about it and something very human. That’s the most important thing – that the film is a poetic meditation on memory but also on humanity and the persistence of humanity.”

Finally there will be a screening of an excerpt from Terminal, a work in progress that is described as an “experimental film essay about industry, time and the cosmos.” O’Sullivan has been shooting the film for over a year on Whiddy Island, off the coast of West Cork, a place he is particularly fond of. “It’s a beautiful place, but also it’s a very storied place as well. There are all these layers of history written into its landscape  from Napoleonic-era military forts that are entirely overgrown now, through to the history of the oil terminal that was built there in the ’60s and remains there in the same form but plays a very different role now. What really interests me about the place is how you’ve had this long duration of hundreds of years of international historical things happening around the island, on the island, but human life persists and just goes on around that. These big cosmic events come and go but human life goes on regardless. That’s what I’m interested in.

“In Terminal I use material I have shot myself on 16mm in combination with archive material and that is something that I have done before but the approach to filming the 16mm material is based on my archive editing experience. I am almost shooting it in a way thinking what would it be like to shoot material and then approach it with an editor’s eye, as though it had been shot for another film. Using the grammar of archive editing in relation to new material. That is something I am quite interested in and it finds itself into pretty much all my work using that archival editing style and eye on all material, not just old material.

 

Tadhg O’Sullivan, in conversation with Michael Ryan, will present Bow Street, What Remains and Terminal (work in progress/8 mins excerpt) on Sunday, 23rd August 2015 at 13.00 at the IFI as part of its Ireland on Sunday monthly showcase for new Irish film.

Tickets are available now from the IFI Box Office on 01 679 3477 or online at www.ifi.ie

 

Share