Call For: Submissions for Frameworks Animated Short Film Scheme

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The deadline for the Irish Film Board short animation scheme Frameworks, now in its 21st edition, has been announced. Applications will be accepted until 1pm Friday, 11th March 2016.

Those wishing to apply should first read the updated guidelines here.

Frameworks is an established scheme for the making of animated short films which has been incredibly successful in stimulating ground-breaking new work from Irish animators. Projects selected for funding will combine creative exploration with an ability to appeal to a broad audience.

Recent successes for previous Frameworks projects include A Coat Made Dark, directed by Jack O’Shea, which has been officially selected for this year’s Clermont-Ferrand International Short Film Festival, and Unhinged directed by Tom Caulfield which won the prize for Best First Animation at the Galway Film Fleadh.

The Frameworks scheme is co-funded by BSÉ/IFB and RTÉ.

 

Looking for funding? Want to submit your work to festivals? Keep an eye on upcoming deadlines here

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Calling All Animators! New Frameworks Deadline Announced

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The deadline for the Irish Film Board short animation scheme Frameworks has been announced. Applications will be accepted until Friday, May 3rd.

Frameworks is an established scheme for the making of animated short films which has been incredibly successful in stimulating ground-breaking new work from Irish animators. Projects selected for funding will combine creative exploration with an ability to appeal to a broad audience.

Irish animation has been drawing much international acclaim in recent years with Granny O’Grimm’s Sleeping Beauty being nominated for a Best Short Animation Academy Award, The Rooster, The Crocodile and The Night Sky being nominated for a prestigious ASIFA Hollywood Annie Award and Irish Folk Furniture which premiered at last years Galway Film Fleadh receiving critical acclaim at the Sundance Film Festival where it picked up the Best Short Animation Award.

The Frameworks scheme is co-funded by BSÉ/IFB, the Arts Council and RTÉ.

Films may be made in Irish or English with Irish applications being actively encouraged.

For more information on making an application and to download an application form visit the Funding Programmes section of the website.

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Call For: Applications for Irish Film Board Frameworks Animation Scheme

 Illustration: Adeline Pericart

The deadline for the Irish Film Board short animation scheme Frameworks has been announced. Applications will be accepted until Friday, 20th April.

Frameworks is an established scheme for the making of animated short films which has been incredibly successful in stimulating ground-breaking new work from Irish animators. Projects selected for funding will combine creative exploration with an ability to appeal to a broad audience.

Irish animation has been drawing much international acclaim in recent years with Granny O’Grimm’s Sleeping Beauty being nominated for a Best Short Animation Academy Award, The Rooster, The Crocodile and The Night Sky being nominated for a prestigious ASIFA Hollywood Annie Award and Old Fangs receiving critical acclaim at the renowned Sundance, Annecy and the London film festivals.

The Frameworks scheme is co-funded by BSÉ/IFB, the Arts Council and RTÉ.

Films may be made in Irish or English with Irish applications being actively encouraged.

For more information on making an application and to download an application form visit the Funding Programmes section of the Irish Film Board website.

A Bheochantóirí!! Spriocdháta Nua Frameworks Á Fógairt

Tá áthas ar Bord Scannán na hÉireann spiocdháta nua a fhógairt do Frameworks – scéim na ngearrscannán beochana. Glacfaí le hiarratais go dtí an Aoine, 20ú Aibreán. Is scéim bhunaithe rathúil í Frameworks do léiriú gearrscannáin bheochana, atá ag spreagadh saothair nuálacha ó bheochantóirí Éireannacha.

Beidh taiscéalaíocht chruthaitheach i gceist leis na tionscnaimh a roghnófaí, agus ba chóir go mbeidh sé ar a gcumas acu lucht féachana leathan a tharraingt. Tá clú idirnáisiúnta bainte amach ag beochan Éireannach sna blianta beaga anuas, le hainmniúchán do Dhuais an Acadaimh – An Gearrscannán Beochana Is Fearr faighte ag Granny O’Grimm’s Sleeping Beauty a stiúraigh Nicky Phelan agus a scríobh Kathleen O’Rourke. Moladh freisin The Rooster, The Crocodile and the Night Sky, a scríobh agus a stiúraigh Padraig Fagan, don ghradam suntasach Annie de chuid ASIFA Hollywood. Taispeánadh Old Fangs de chuid Adrien Merigeau ag an bhféile cháiliúil Sundance, agus ag Féile Scannán Annecy agus Féile Scannán Londan anuraidh, le moladh óna léirmheastóirí.

Tá Scéim Frameworks maoinithe ag BSÉ, An Chomhairle Ealaíon agus RTÉ. Is féidir scannáin a dhéanamh as Gaeilge nó i mBéarla, agus cuirimid fáilte mhór go háirithe roimh iarratais as Gaeilge. Le tuilleadh eolais a fháil ar conas iarratas a dhéanamh agus chun foirm iarratais a íoslódáil, téigh chuig Clár Maoiniú Frameworks ar laithreán gréasáin BSÉ.

 

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Irish Film Board announce Frameworks and Short Shorts Funding Winners

 

(Give Up Yer Aul Sins)

Bord Scannán na hÉireann/ the Irish Film Board is pleased to announce that the latest round of successful Frameworks and Short Shorts teams have been selected.

This is the 16th year of the Frameworks short film scheme, which is dedicated exclusively to the production of animated films.  The scheme was established to develop new talent and skills in the field of animation and has been extremely successful in encouraging innovative and novel work from Irish animators.

Previous Frameworks success stories include Brown Bag Films’ Give Up Your Aul Sins and Granny O’Grimm’s Sleeping Beauty which were both nominated for Oscars in the Best Animated Short Film category and Cartoon Saloon’s Old Fangs which was officially selected for the prestigious Sundance Film Festival.  Kealan O’Rourke’s The Boy Who Lived in a Bubble also picked up two awards at its premiere at the Galway Film Fleadh last month.

The successful projects selected for funding this year combine creative exploration with an ability to appeal to a broad audience. This year’s successful projects are:

  • Coda to be written and directed by Alan Holly and produced by Ciaran Deeney for And Maps and Plans. Alan previously directed the Frameworks project The Red Ball.
  • Trid an Stoirm to be written and directed by Fred Burdy and produced by Sean McGrath for Windmill Lane Studios.
  • The Nonexistent Thoughts to be written and directed by Eoin Duffy with Alan Doherty producing.
  • Fear of Flying to be written and directed by Conor Finnegan. It will be produced by Brunella Cocchiglia and Lovely Productions who previously produced the short The Invention of the Light Bulb.

Frameworks is co-financed by Bord Scannán na hÉireann/ the Irish Film Board, RTÉ and the Arts Council. 

The Short Shorts scheme provides funding for up to seven, 3-5 minute films and aims to encourage the making of very short films that are innovative, provocative or in some way risky and rule-breaking. A unique feature of the scheme is that the films must conform to a particular genre or theme chosen for each year. This year’s Short Shorts, whether live action or animated, had to adhere to and explore a theme of food.

Some of the recent successful Short Shorts projects include the IFTA-nominated Headspace, directed by Patrick Semple, Ian W.Davis’ The Night-Nurse, which was selected for a host of international festivals such as the Short Short Film Festival Japan and the Irish Film Festival Boston to name but a few.  David O’Sullivan’s colourful Bollywood musical Moore Street Masala which was selected for the Clermont-Ferrand Film Festival and Ian Power’s Dental Breakdown, which scooped the Best Comedy Short at the Fastnet Film Festival and the Award of Excellence at the LA Movie Awards. 

This year’s successful projects are:

  • Bird Food to be written and directed by Richard Keane.  It will be produced by Laura Roche for Brown Bag Films, the two times Oscar® nominated animation production company. 
  • Pet Hate to be written and directed by Andy Clarke and produced by Sean McGrath.
  • Brown Bread to be written by Matt Roche, directed by Luke McManus and produced by Annemarie Naughton.  Annemarie previously produced the short films The Wednesdays and Atlantic.
  • Barry’s Bespoke Bakery to be written and directed by Denis McCardle and produced by Ben Keenan for Songway Films.
  • Seagull Wants to Fish to be written and directed Teemu Auersalo and produced by Nicky Gogan and Still Films, the same team behind the Frameworks short Trolley Boy.
  • The Tree to be written and directed by David Freyne and produced by Rachael O’Kane for Tilted Pictures. David and Rachael previously worked together on the two shorts The Man in 301 and The Mill.
  • Juste un Peu Plus to be written and directed by Conor Ferguson, produced by Ailish Bracken and Blinder Films, with Katie Holly as Executive Producer. Conor also directed the award-winning The Wednesdays and Atlantic.

Both the Frameworks and Short Shorts projects will premiere at the Galway Film Fleadh 2012.

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Barley Films Nominated for the 2009 Annie Awards

Irish animation studio Barley Films has been nominated for an ASIFA-Hollywood Annie Award for Best Short Animation by the International Animated Film Society for The Rooster, the Crocodile and the Night Sky. The film was made with the support of the Irish Film Board, the Arts Council and RTÉ under the Film Board’s FRAMEWORKS scheme for short animation. Directed by Pádraig Fagan, narrated by the legendary Frank Kelly and with animation by Eimhin McNamara and Orla McHardy the film is a tale of passion, loss, surreal comedy and explosive violence. It is animated in a cut-out style using cardboard, tinfoil, paint on glass animation and super-8 film footage to create a dreamy hand made aesthetic. It was produced by Barry O’Donoghue.

Clips from the films can be seen at www.barleyfilms.net

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Successful 'FRAMEWORKS' Short Film Teams Announced

Bord Scannan na hÉireann/the Irish Film Board, the Arts Council and RTÉ have announced the successful new FRAMEWORKS projects. FRAMEWORKS is aimed exclusively at the production of animated short films up to six minutes in duration. It is currently in its 14th year, having been established in 1995 with the intention of developing new talent and skills in the area of animation. It has been very successful to date in supporting the production of exciting and creative work.

Recent achievements include A Film From My Parish, directed by Tony Donoghue, which was selected for the Sundance Festival; and Granny O’Grimm’s Sleeping Beauty, produced by Brown Bag Films, which has received a number of international awards and screened at many festivals worldwide. Previous FRAMEWORKS shorts include Give Up Your Aul Sins, which was nominated for an Oscar® in the Best Short Film Category in 2001.

This year’s selected projects are:

23 Degrees 5 Minutes, to be written and directed by Darragh O’Connell and produced by Colm Tyrell of Brown Bag Films.

The Meaning of Eggsistence, to be written and directed by Bruce Ryder and produced by Stephen Rennicks and Lenny Abrahamson of Element Films.

The Boy Who Lived in a Bubble, to be written and directed by Kealan O’Rourke and produced by Brian Willis of Igloo Productions.

Red Lead, to be written and directed by Tony O’Donoghue and produced by Cathal Black of Mayfly Films Ltd.

Paperman, to be written by Richard Kelly and Sean Ryan, directed by Richard Kelly and produced by Jessica Kelly of Prickly Pear Productions.

For more information, please visit www.irishfilmboard.ie

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Frameworks at the Galway Film Fleadh

A great selection of diverse animated shorts will again premiere at this year’s Galway Film Fleadh highlighting the wealth of animation talent in Ireland.

The Frameworks scheme aims to combine this creative exploration with an ability to appeal to a wide audience.

This year’s short animations include Louise Bagnall’s Donkey which tells the tale of Donkey who is sick of his minimum wage job. This is Louise’s first Framework film after writing and directing the Short Short Colour Contamination last year. Donkey is produced by Niamh O’Donoghue and Barley Films.

In Old Fangs, written and directed by Adrien Merigeau, a young wolf decides to confront his father who he’s not seen since he was a child. The short was produced by Ross Murray and Cartoon Saloon, European Production Company of the Year whose feature film The Secret of Kells has just picked up awards at the Edinburgh and Annecy Film Festivals.

Written and directed by John McCloskey and produced by Pearse Moore for Raw Nerve Productions Guns, Bees and Tadpoles is an animated tale set in seventies Northern Ireland, where a summer’s day takes a turn to the extraordinary for a normal family in not so normal times.

Trolley Boy is written and directed by Teemu Auersalo. It tells the tale of Trolley Boy whose frustration with work builds up into a giant monster made of shopping trolleys. After which he realizes there’s more to life than pushing trolleys into stacks. It was produced by Nicky Gogan for Glimpse Digital.

Finally David Quin’s T’was a Terrible Hard Work documents Tipperary miners from the Slieveardagh coal fields as they describe their live and work underground. This short animation was produced by Steve Woods for Cel’Division. Written by Alice Lyons, it was co-directed by Alice and Orla McHardy.

Frameworks is co-funded by the Irish Film Board, the Arts Council and RTE.

These shorts will premiere on Saturday 11th July at 3 pm in the Town Hall Theatre.

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Issue 129 – Frameworks Works

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Jennie McGinn on the continued success of the Irish Film Board’s animated shorts scheme.

Have you ever thought about crabs revolting against their status in the universe? Or the perils of being a badly-drawn cartoon in a straight-laced live-action world? Have you thought about the metaphysical implications of being absorbed in someone else’s memories? Or what happens to the losing snooker balls when they get potted?

These are some of the philosophically complex questions the world of animation throws up. Animated films can delve into topical and thematic depths impossible for a live-action story to convey. Animations can wrestle grandiose concepts and sublime stories and produce a visually gripping and highly entertaining narrative. Some of the key ingredients for the success of animation is this creative freedom and conceptually powerful stories. But why has Irish animation been thriving across the globe? The industry has been growing exponentially over the past ten years for myriad reasons, but undoubtedly a crucial facility for short animation has been the Frameworks scheme.

A history of Frameworks
Frameworks was established in 1997 and has been funding animated short films for 13 years. It is co-funded by the Arts Council, Radio Teilifís Éireann and BSÉ/IFB. The scheme funds an average of six films a year with a budget of up to €50,000 per film. The scheme is extremely popular and there is an average of 45 entries every year. Frameworks, as an animation strand, has been so successful in its output, its scope and its remit, that it remains essentially the same scheme today as it did in 1997. As Fran Keaveney, Short Film Executive with the Film Board, noted, the Film Board revamped all of its schemes in 2007 ‘but we really felt that Frameworks had been so successful that it really didn’t need to be changed.’

The impact of Frameworks
According to Keaveney, Frameworks ‘provides a vital platform and training opportunity for new talent.’ The scheme has nurtured a community of animators, artists, producers and directors and encourages them to take creative risks and innovate the sector. Rod Stoneman of the Huston Film School notes that it was designed to ‘widen the range, formats and genres of animation and strengthen aesthetics.’ The Frameworks scheme stipulates that recipients must work alongside an in-house Film Board executive in a kind of mentoring relationship. The successful applicants are paired with this industry professional to create long-lasting relationships after the film has been produced, to ensure directors are nurtured for the animation industry. Each year the scheme is launched at the Galway Film Fleadh and each film is distributed to 20 festivals, assigned a three-year distribution deal and showcased in an annual DVD. Derry O’Brien, distributor with Network Ireland TV, points out that the scheme is a unique vehicle for animation talent: ‘As far as I’m aware, there is no similarly supported animation strand in either the UK or Europe.’

The full article is printed in Film Ireland 129.

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