Irish Films in Cinema 2016

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Keep an eye on the Irish films scheduled for release in cinemas in 2016.

 I Am Not a Serial Killer (Billy O’Brien)

9th December

A troubled teen with homicidal tendencies has to hunt down and destroy a supernatural killer while suppressing his own inner demons.


Crash & Burn (Seán Ó Cualáin)

2nd December

Crash & Burn tells the story of Dundalk-born Tommy Byrne, who, for a fleeting moment in the early ’80s, was the world’s greatest driver


Moscow Never Sleeps (Johnny O’Reilly)

11th November

The lives of six very different people mix in the most exciting and drammatic ways in today’s Moscow

 


The Land of the Enlightened (Pieter-Jan De Pue)

11th November

A gang of Afghan kids from the Kuchi tribe dig out old Soviet mines and sell the explosives to children working in a lapis lazuli mine. When not dreaming of the time when American troops finally withdraw from their land, another gang of children keeps tight control on the caravans smuggling the blue gemstones through the arid mountains of Pamir.


Further Beyond (Christine Molloy, & Joe Lawlor)

21st October

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A deconstructed biopic of the extraordinary Ambrosio O’Higgins, who left Ireland to become the captain general of Chile in the Spanish Empire.


The Flag (Declan Recks)

14th October

Irish Londoner Harry Hambridge comes across an extraordinary testimony from his Grandfather, claiming that it was he who hoisted the Irish flag on top of the GPO during the 1916 rising and that the self same flag was hung upside-down in an army barracks in Hampshire, Harry knows his long awaited call in life has arrived.


Mattress Men (Colm Quinn)

7th October

A bittersweet and moving tale of friendship and the struggles of two men that is sure to delight audiences everywhere.


Dare to Be Wild (Vivienne De Courcy)

23rd September

Irishwoman Mary Reynolds goes from an outsider to a champion at the Chelsea Flower Show.


The Young Offenders (Peter Foott)

16th September

Two teenage boys from Cork steal bicycles and ride off on a quest to find a missing bale of cocaine worth 7,000,000 euros.


A Date for Mad Mary (Darren Thornton)

2nd September

‘Mad’ Mary McArdle returning to Drogheda after a short spell in prison – for something she’d rather forget. Back home, everything and everyone has changed. Her best friend, Charlene, is about to get married and Mary is maid of honour. When Charlene refuses Mary a ‘plus one’ on the grounds that she probably couldn’t find a date, Mary becomes determined to prove her wrong. But her attempts at dating are a disaster and she winds up feeling more alone… until she meets Jess and everything changes.


Strange Occurrences in a Small Irish Village (Aoife Kelleher)

12th August

Explores the big question of faith, in a small Irish village.


Viva (Paddy Breathnach)

19th August

Viva follows Jesus, an eighteen-year-old Cuban who is lost and struggling to realize his true identity. Unsure of himself or his future direction, he works at a local Havana drag club where he entertains dreams of becoming a performer whilst earning his money through hustling. At home he finds solace listening to the records his mother and grandmother left him. Into his life, however, comes a force to challenge his direction and free


Bobby Sands: 66 Days (Brendan J. Byrne)

5th August

A cinematic portrait of the Irish Republican martyr’s epic 66day hunger strike that grabbed the worlds attention in the early 1980s.


Mom and Me (Ken Wardrop) 

15th July

A creative documentary that delicately challenges the familiar love story shared between a son and his mother. It is a story that reveals comedy in the everyday and misery on some other days.


The Price of Desire (Mary McGuckian)

25th May

The Price Of Desire is the controversial story of how Eileen Gray’s influential contribution to 20th century architecture and design was almost entirely wiped from history by the egotistical ‘Father of Modernism’ Le Corbusier, and of how her relationship with philanderer Jean Badovici (Le Corbusier’s promoter by way of his influential architectural publication L’Architecture Vivante) further fuelled the rift between the two architects, both personally and professionally, consigning her legacy to a century of neglect and long-overdue recognition.


Who is Dervla Murphy? (Garret Daly)

23rd April

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A profile of Ireland’s most prolific travel writer who has written twenty four books, been on countless journeys, and has a worldwide fan base and massive critical success.


My Name is Emily (Simon Fitzmaurice)

April (8th April)

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After her mother dies and her father is institutionalized, Emily is placed in a foster home and in a new school where she is ostracized. When her father’s annual card fails to arrive on her 16th birthday, Emily knows something’s wrong. She decides to take matters into her own hands and, enlisting her only friend at school, Arden, sets off on a road trip to break her father out of the psych ward. As their journey progresses Emily and Arden become close, and both come to realize important truths about the nature of relationships, both to their parents and to each other.


Mammal (Rebecca Daly)

1st April

A love story between a woman who has lost her son in tragic circumstances and the relationship she develops with a homeless youth.


Atlantic (Risteard O’Domhnaill)

29th April 

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Atlantic is the latest film from the makers of the multi-award-winning documentary, The Pipe (2010). This film follows the fortunes of three small fishing communities – in Ireland, Norway and Newfoundland – which are at turns united and divided by the Atlantic Ocean. In recent times, mounting challenges within their own industries, the fragile environment, and the lure of high wages for young fishermen on the oil rigs have seen these fishing communities struggle to maintain their traditional way of life. As the oil majors push into deeper water and further into the Arctic, and the world’s largest fishing companies chase the last great Atlantic shoals, the impact on coastal communities and the ecosystems they rely on is reaching a tipping point. Atlantic tells three very personal stories of those who face the devastating prospect of having their livelihoods taken from them, and their communities destroyed both environmentally and economically.

Sing Street (John Carney)

18th March

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Having experienced a tough time at home, a young boy strikes out on his own and forms a band.


Traders (Rachael Moriarty, Peter Murphy)

11th March

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Harry is offered a new business proposition. Two people convert all their assets to cash, arrange to meet, dig one grave and fight to the death. Winner buries the loser and instantly doubles his value.


The Truth Commissioner (Declan Recks)

26th February

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Set in a post-troubles Northern Ireland, The Truth Commissioner follows the fictional story of Henry Stanfield, a career diplomat who has just been appointed as Truth Commissioner to Northern Ireland. The story revolves around the lives of three men who are directly or indirectly involved in the disappearance, 20 years earlier, of the 15-year-old Connor Roche. Though Stanfield starts bravely, he quickly uncovers some bloody and inconvenient truths about those now running the country; truths which none of those in power are prepared to have revealed. Everyone claims to want the truth, but what is it going to cost, and who is going to pay for it?


The Survivalist (Stephen Fingleton)

12th February

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He was one of those people who thought the end was coming. What if he was right?


Strangerland (Kim Farrant)

5th  February 

The Parker family, new to the remote desert town of Nathgari, are thrown into crisis when parents Catherine and Matthew discover that their two teenage kids have mysteriously disappeared just before a massive dust storm hits the town. With the town now eerily smothered in red dust and darkness, the locals join the search led by local cop David Rae. But scorching temperatures mean the chances of survival are plummeting with each passing day and Catherine and Matthew find themselves pushed to the brink as they struggle to survive the uncertainty of their children’s fate.


Room (Lenny Abrahamson)

15th January

To Jack, Room is the world…. It’s where he was born, it’s where he and his Ma eat and sleep and play and learn. But while it’s home to Jack, to Ma it’s a prison. Through her fierce love for her son, Ma has managed to create a childhood for him in their ten-by-ten-foot space. But as Jack’s curiosity is building alongside Ma’s own desperation – she knows that Room cannot contain either indefinitely.


Shem the Penman Sings Again (Pádraig Trehy)

8th January

Shem The Penman Sings Again is an experimental feature film that provides a way into James Joyce’s creative imagination and the conception of “Finnegans Wake”.


Last Hijack (Tommy Pallotta and Femke Wolting)

8th January

A true tale of survival in Somalia told from the pirate’s perspective.  The film takes an innovative hybrid approach to explore how one Somali pirate – Mohamed – came to live such a brutal and dangerous existence.


dom – his long-lost father Angel, once a celebrated boxer and newly released from a 15-year prison term..


 

 

 

 

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Interview: Director Rebecca Daly & Actor Barry Keoghan of ‘Mammal’

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Mammal is the story of a woman (Rachel Griffiths) who has lost her son and develops an unorthodox relationship with Joe,  a homeless youth (Barry Keoghan). Their tentative trust is threatened by his involvement with a violent gang and the escalation of her ex-husband’s grieving rage.

Paul Farren talks to the film’s director Rebecca Daly and actor Barry Keoghan.

 

Great performance Barry – really intense. It must have been a big challenge for you.

BarryIt was a great script – not a lot got said and I had to internalise everything. I love doing those roles where you let your actions speak, where one look can mean a thousand words.

 

Which leads me to the script, how do you write that Rebecca? I mean, you know that old principle ‘if it’s not on the stage it’s not on the page’ –  this kind of drama doesn’t come off the page easily.

Rebecca: Actually, our script is quite rich; it is itself a piece of writing. What we are describing a lot is atmosphere, tone and the feel of the thing. I think you get that from the script. It’s true that there’s not a lot of dialogue but film is a visual medium. If you can’t show the thing with the action of the actor then you go to dialogue. To me, I would rather show it first. My characters usually express their emotions through their actions rather than through telling you how they are feeling or having big outbursts.

 

From an acting perspective what was the approach to the subject matter and getting into that level of intimacy that the role required?

Barry: Rebecca kept it fresh. We didn’t really do rehearsals – we just talked about scenes. We joked on set a lot which made it comfortable.

 

Where did the kernel of the film come from?

Rebecca: It was actually Glenn Montgomery, the co-writer of the film. It was his idea to make this film about a woman who doesn’t know how to mother – and it came out of that. He started asking me questions in terms of her character, in terms of her circumstances that led her to making that decision… and then how it impacts afterwards on how she lives her life, how she interacts with people, especially, obviously Joe. It was a succession of steps really.

 

The character Margaret is trying to deal with her tragedy but stay away from it at the same time. Like her function in the charity shop, seems like a subliminal approach to dealing with that.

Rebecca: And she takes in lodgers. She cares for people without having the risk of emotional attachment. She lives in that sort of liminal space. Joe changes that!

 

How did Barry come to play the role of Joe?

Rebecca: Barry was the first person we saw for the part. We did see a lot of people afterwards because I’m painfully diligent! But really no-one came close to Barry – he just kind of was Joe.

Barry: Joe is from my area. He’s one of the lads. I know him.  And there’s bits of him in me. More personality-wise than experience as such. He reminds me of lads I know standing on the canal having a few drinks.

 

He’s a real city lad.

Barry: Yeh he is, but he’s just a mammy’s boy really!

 

There is the sense that when he is on his night time attacks with the gang he’s the runt of the litter. He’s probably cleverer than the other guys – not as tough, I suppose he hasn’t been there that long. He’s the bait.

Rebecca: Yeh, he’s the bait. We can empathise with him. He’s involved in some pretty rough things and cruel things as well. But I think, for Joe, it’s all about survival. He’s doing everything to survive; whatever it takes.

 

I suppose one of the challenges of this piece is its avoidance of types, it’s not simply about good guys and bad guys.

Rebecca: These are the interesting characters. I’m not interested in someone being all good or all bad. Flawed, contradictory, complicated – likeable, unloveable, unlikeable and loveable – that all mixes in people. That’s what people are like.

 

In that way, you are challenging audience’s opinions of these characters. It seems that is what your work does. And that means asking the audience to go the extra mile and in participating with the film.

Rebecca: If I’m in a room with 5 people I’m interested in the quiet one. I want to find out more about them.  I’m drawn to people who have mystery about them – and I think characters in film and films themselves can function like that. And if a film asks you to lean in a bit you can get something very rewarding out of that experience. That’s the cinema I’m interested I’m making as opposed to the type of cinema that jumps out at you. I think if you participate in something more you’ll have a deeper experience.

 

Mammal is in cinemas from 1st April

 

 

 

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‘Mammal’ Cinema Release

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Rebecca Daly’s critically acclaimed dramatic feature film Mammal starring Academy Award® nominated and Golden Globe® winning actress Rachel Griffiths and rising Irish star Barry Keoghan will be released in Irish cinemas on Friday, April 1st.

This announcement follows the news that the film picked up the Panavision Spirit Award for Independent Cinema at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival over the weekend.

Also starring Michael McElhatton , Johnny Ward and Nika McGuigan (Philomena) Mammal is the compelling story of a woman (Griffiths) who has lost her son and develops an unorthodox relationship with a homeless youth (Keoghan). Their tentative trust is threatened by his involvement with a violent gang and the escalation of her ex-husband’s (McElhatton) grieving rage.

The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival last month where it was one of only five films picked up by the Sundance Channel and was included in Vanity Fair’s Top 10 Films of Sundance.  It had its European premiere at the International Film Festival Rotterdam earlier this month and has also screened at the Gothenburg International Film Festival in Sweden.  Irish audiences will get a chance to see the film later this month when it screens at the Audi Dublin International Film Festival where Barry Keoghan and Nika McGuigan both have been nominated for the ADIFF Discovery Award.

 

Mammal will be released by Wildcard Distribution in cinemas nationwide from Friday, 1st April. 

 

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Trailer: Mammal

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Rebecca Daly’s new drama Mammal, which has just had its world premiere in the World Drama Competition at the 2016  Sundance Film Festival in Utah, stars Rachel Griffiths as a grieving mother battling both her violent ex-husband (Michael McElhatton) and her interest in the homeless young man (Barry Keoghan) she meets at her local swimming pool. Their tentative trust is threatened by his involvement with a violent gang and the escalation of her ex-husband’s grieving rage.
 
Mammal was produced by Macdara Kelleher and Conor Barry for Fastnet Films  and was funded by the Irish Film Board (IFB), Luxembourg Film Fund, BAI, TV3 and the Netherlands Film Fund.The  film will be distributed by Wildcard Distribution and is set for an Irish cinema release later this year.
 

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‘Mammal’ to Screen in Rotterdam & Netherlands

 

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The Irish feature film Mammal starring Academy Award® nominated and Golden Globe® winning actress Rachel Griffiths  and rising Irish star Barry Keoghan  continues its run of festival selections with the news that it will have its European premiere at the International Film Festival Rotterdam in the Netherlands and that it is also selected for the Gothenburg International Film Festival in Sweden which is Scandinavia’s largest film event.

The announcements come ahead of the film’s world premiere at the A-list Sundance Film Festival later this month.

Mammal, which co-stars Michael McElhatton and Johnny Ward  is the story of a woman (Griffiths) who has lost her son and develops an unorthodox relationship with a homeless youth (Keoghan).  Their tentative trust is threatened by his involvement with a violent gang and the escalation of her ex-husband’s (McElhatton) grieving rage.

Directed by Rebecca Daly and written by Daly and Glenn Montgomery, Mammal was selected as part of the first Berlinale Residency, a programme organised by the Berlin International Film Festival to support writer/directors develop their new projects.  Daly’s debut feature The Other Side of Sleep premiered at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival Directors Fortnight.

Mammal was produced by Macdara Kelleher and Conor Barry for Fastnet Films (Strangerland, Kisses, What If) and was funded by the Irish Film Board (IFB), Luxembourg Film Fund, BAI, TV3 and the Netherlands Film Fund.  Picture Tree are the films sales agent.

Wildcard Distribution will be releasing the film in Irish cinemas later this year.

 

International Film Festival Rotterdam takes place 27th January – 7th February.

Gothenburg International Film Festival takes place 29th January – 8th February.

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Academy Award® nominated actress Rachel Griffiths confirmed for

Actress Griffiths, star of new film Step Up, poses at film's premiere in Hollywood

Academy Award® nominated and Golden Globe® winning actress Rachel Griffiths (Six Feet Under, Muriel’s Wedding) is now confirmed to star in the lead role of new feature film Mammal. Irish rising star Barry Keoghan (Love/Hate, Trespass Against Us) will play opposite her in the film which will be directed by Rebecca Daly, whose debut feature The Other Side of Sleep premiered at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival Directors Fortnight.

Mammal is a compelling and unorthodox love story between a woman (Griffiths) who has lost her son in tragic circumstances and the relationship she develops with a homeless youth (Keoghan).

Written by Rebecca Daly and Glenn Montgomery, the film is being produced by Macdara Kelleher for Fastnet Films (Strangerland, Kisses, The Other Side of Sleep) with co-producers Calach Films in Luxembourg and Rinkel Film in The Netherlands.

Speaking about the project, Kelleher said “Mammal is a powerful moving story and we are excited to be working Rebecca again and with the incredible cast of Rachel Griffiths and Barry Keoghan”.

The film, which will shoot in Dublin and Luxembourg in October, was selected as part of the first Berlinale Residency, a programme organised by the Berlin International Film Festival to support writer/directors develop their new projects.

Funded by Bord Scannán na hEireann / the Irish Film Board (IFB), Luxembourg Film Fund, BAI, TV3, the Dutch Film Fund and the Dutch Production Incentive, MAMMAL will be brought to Irish audiences by Wildcard Distribution with Cinéart distributing the film in BeNeLux countries and Berlin based Picture Tree International (PTI) taking world sales rights.

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Irish Feature Films Selected for Berlinale Co-Production Market

 

The Valentine Gang and Scumbot have been selected along with 36 other projects and seven internationally renowned production companies for the tenth Berlinale Co-Production Market next month. Mammal has been chosen as a Berlinale Residency project.

The Co-Production Market aims to establish new partnerships and offer the opportunity to explore possibilities for collaborations. Participants of the market which include producers, sales agents, distributors, TV-broadcasters, funders and financiers may request 30-minute one-on-one meetings with selected projects as well as with the selected companies. It is expected that over 800 meetings will be scheduled for the two-day event.

Ripple World Pictures’ The Valentine Gang directed by Darragh Byrne and  Scumbot, directed by James Cotter, are selected as one of 20 new international fictional film projects to have been chosen from 318 entries for the Co-Production Market for potential co-production and financing partners to explore. Rebecca Daly’s Mammal produced by Fastnet Films is one of the five projects to have been borne out of the first edition of the Berlinale Residency last autumn where scripts were developed over a four-month stay in Berlin.

The Berlinale Co-Production Market is part of the European Film Market and takes place February 10th – 12th 2013.

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