Síle Culley, Jessie Fisk & Sean Clancy Selected to Attend Berlinale Talents

Irish filmmaker Sean Clancy, UK-based distributor Síle Culley and producer Jessie Fisk have been selected to attend Berlinale Talents 2019.

Sean has written and directed short films including Cavalier as well as the award winning feature film Locus of Control, to be released later this year.

Jessie Fisk’s credits include Songs of Granite, Losing Alaska and Rialto, which is due for release.

An initiative of the Berlin International Film Festival, Berlinale Talents is a weeklong talent development programme for the world’s top 250 emerging filmmakers.

From February 9 to 14, 2019, the up-and-coming film professionals will gather at Berlinale Talents to share ideas, network, and further develop their latest projects. This year’s group of 141 women and 109 men is socially, culturally, and artistically extremely diverse. The 250 participants at this year’s Berlinale Talents, were chosen from 3,401 international applicants by an internal selection committee on the basis of prior achievements, resonance and relevance of the work as well as exceptional promise.

 

 

For more information on Berlinale Talents 2019, visit their website here

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Sean Clancy. Writer / Director of ‘Locus of Control’

 

Locus of Control introduces us to Andrew Egan, who reluctantly accepts a teaching job to support his floundering, stand-up comedy career. As an increasingly anxious Andrew grows accustomed to the droll institution and its occupants he suspects that one of the students may be his downfall and that the previous teacher may not have left of his own accord. His life slowly unraveling, Andrew’s lessons fall on deaf ears and he soon becomes part of a larger cosmic joke. 

 

Ahead of its screening at Filmbase, Sean Clancy tells us about his dark comedy about decision and control.

 

 

For the last few years I’ve made all sorts of short films and sketches, all of which were experiments or challenges in some way. These pieces were as much about becoming familiar with the ins and outs of filmmaking as they were a reason to get people together and just have fun creating something. Locus of Control was born of the same attitude and feels like the culmination of all the various styles and ideas I’ve thrown around in the past.

The story centres on Andrew Egan, played by John Morton, a struggling stand-up comedian on the dole whose life becomes a slightly surreal descent after taking a job to help the unemployed re-enter the workforce. John described it as “The Shining on a Jobridge” which is a pretty accurate description. It’s got elements of a character with self-absorbed, creative frustrations in an ominous building and a world that gets more sinister as things progress. But the horror and the comedy elements of the film are inseparable, they both play off a sense of tension that run throughout. Peter McGann who plays Chris called it ‘Barton Fink on the dole’ so it’s a story that starts off more comedic and little by little becomes more like a psychological horror.

The idea for the film came when, a few years ago, I was on a course as part of social welfare and we were given a personality test called locus of control. Based on your answers, the test would tell you if you had an ‘internal locus’ or an ‘external locus’, basically whether you felt you had any power over your own life or if it was something that was all dictated by chance, luck and other outside forces. I had been working on an idea for a story about a comedian and when I started the script I introduced elements of a slightly absurd and frustrating bureaucracy but I was more interested in making a story about behaviour and how much control you really have over your life. Andrew’s teaching job is used as a starting point to explore the effects of anxiety, depression, decisions and choice. A kind of domino effect of helplessness and feeling worthless. The film is told from Andrew’s point of view so we see the world how he sees it, not necessarily how it is. As the story builds, the world becomes increasingly threatening and the reality of what’s actually happening becomes more and more questionable.

John Morton was the only person I wanted to play Andrew. We’ve worked together before so I knew what he could bring to a role like this and just as importantly, we get along. That goes a long way when you’re halfway through the shoot, sleep deprived, standing in a rainy car park at three in the morning and asking for another take. John is so well versed in writing and directing his own projects that I can’t imagine making the film without having his insight and experience.

Seamus O’Rourke plays John Lance D’Arcy, a long-standing teacher at Andrew’s new workplace who, like Andrew, is at odds with the world around him.  Before making Locus of Control a friend of mine asked me in passing if I’d seen any of Seamus’ videos online, I hadn’t but as soon as I did I was hooked. A collection of acutely observed monologues that are as sincere as they are funny. I got in touch with Seamus and crossed my fingers. After seeing him perform one of his own one-man plays live I was finding it hard to picture anyone else in the role. Luckily he said yes.

Everyone in the cast did a great job and I can’t thank them enough. We shot for fifteen days with a budget of about €800. People were so engaged and easy to work with that it made a schedule and budget like that much easier than it should be.

I knew the music was going to play a huge part in creating a certain kind of tension and mystery. I’ve been friends with Callum Condron since primary school and he’s an incredibly versatile musician. We hadn’t worked on anything quite like this before but Callum sent on a lot of different mixes as I was editing and he ended up making an album’s worth of brilliant music that fits the film perfectly. You can listen to some of the soundtrack here.

Looking back on the production, it seems like a bit of a blur but I enjoyed every minute of it. I’m incredibly grateful to all of the people who came together to get it made and now that it’s all over I can’t wait to do it again.

 

 

Locus of Control will screen in Filmbase, Dublin on March 7th at 8:15pm as part of the Silk Road International Film Festival 2018.

 

 

Facebook page: www.facebook.com/locusofcontrolfilm

 

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RTÉ & Galway Film Centre Short Film Commission 2017

 

 

Galway City of Film has announced that 3 scripts have been selected for this year’s RTÉ/Galway Film Centre Short Film Commission from writers Jonathan Hughes, Siobhan Donnellan and Sean Clancy.

The three writers each received €500 prize money and they have all been working with Script Editor Deirdre Roycroft over the past four weeks, to develop and refine their short film scripts. One of these scripts will be soon be selected to go forward for production with a budget of just under €15,000.

The next stage of the commission will be to select the director and producer which will be done on the basis of the applications already submitted. Directors and producers will be shortlisted and sent the three winning script and invited to interview in mid May to discuss how they would approach the script. On the basis of this interview the final ‘director / producer / writer’ team will be selected.

Following on from this the directors will be mentored by an experienced director through prep, casting right right through to being supported on set. The directors mentoring panel will include Dearbhla Walsh (Penny Dreadful, Roald Dahl’s Esio Trot) and Paddy Breathnach, (Shrooms, I Went Down).

 

 

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‘Locus of Control’ to Premiere at Indie Cork Film Festival

locus-of-control-teaser-poster

 

Locus of Control the debut feature film from writer/director Sean Clancy will have its first screening at Indie Cork Film Festival on October 12th at 6:30pm.

 

Tickets are now on sale now and can be purchased here:  http://bit.ly/2dAp4Ke

 

The dark comedy about ego and insecurity centres on struggling stand-up comedian, Andrew Egan as he reluctantly accepts a teaching job helping the unemployed re-enter the work force. As Andrew grows accustomed to the droll institution and its occupants he suspects that one of the students may be his downfall and that the previous teacher may not have left of his own accord. His life slowly unraveling, Andrew’s lessons fall on deaf ears and he soon becomes part of a larger cosmic joke.

 

 

More details can be found at:

Facebook         www.facebook.com/locusofcontrolfilm/

Twitter               twitter.com/LOCfilm

Official site       www.seanclancyfilm.com/locus-of-control

 

 

 

 

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Trailer: ‘Locus of Control’

Locus of Control Teaser Poster

 

The first teaser trailer for Locus of Control, the debut feature film from writer/director Sean Clancy is now online. The dark comedy about ego and insecurity centres on struggling stand-up comedian, Andrew Egan, as he reluctantly accepts a teaching job helping the unemployed re-enter the work force. As Andrew grows accustomed to the droll institution and its occupants he suspects that one of the students may be his downfall and that the previous teacher may not have left of his own accord. His life slowly unraveling, Andrew’s lessons falls on deaf ears and he soon becomes part of a larger cosmic joke.

 

The independently produced film was shot in Sligo and Leitrim in September of 2015, with a cast that includes John Morton, Seamus O’Rourke and Peter McGann. The original music was composed by Callum Condron.

 

 

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Short Film: Watch ‘Cavalier’

Peter McGann as Luke in Cavalier

The award-winning short film Cavalier is a heartache comedy about a directionless young man who reflects on a life of poor decisions as everyone around him seems to be in full control of their future.

Cavalier has travelled the world in the last twelve months including screenings at Indie Cork, Aesthetica Short Film Festival, Richard Harris International Film Festival, Chicago Irish Film Festival and a win for best comedy at The 5th Underground Short Film Festival.

The independently produced film was shot in Co.Galway, Ireland in March of 2014, with a cast that includes Peter McGann, Aoife Spratt (Trampoline), Kenny Gaughan and Roisin Dolan and a crew of one in the form of Sean Clancy. The score was composed by Callum Condron.

Writer.director Sean Clancy told Film Ireland that “Cavalier was born of ideas I had started to write for a character who spent most of his waking life trying to justify his indecision and apathy.

“Its just a brief window into Luke’s life, there’s no real growth on his part, just a slowly sinking feeling that he’s probably more responsible for his own misery than he’d like to admit.

“The relationship aspect of the story is definitely tied to Annie Hall. There’s no better way to mine a characters insecurities and anxieties than by discussing a past relationship and it also allows for a more rational and less self self involved perspective from Jane.

“I didn’t set out to write specially about a relationship but over time it was the one aspect that tied everything else together. A heartache story from the point of view of someone who never leaves their phone unchecked, someone who constantly compares himself to others and who’s always connected but never engaged.”

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