Call For: Applications for Student Media Production Awards 2018

Creative Europe Desk Ireland MEDIA and Filmbase invite media students in Ireland to apply for support for the production and distribution of graduate film and media projects. This support will be open to any student, or groups of students, collaborating on the creation of an audiovisual film, documentary or multimedia project as part of their final year coursework.

  • Information Session 06 March in Filmbase | Apply here to secure your place.
  • Application Deadline 20 March | Eligibility & Application Forms available here.

These awards will provide support for film and media students graduating into the Irish and European audiovisual industries and to encourage graduates to develop the essential skills necessary for creating future funding applications. As such the application process for support replicates key aspects of the application process for Irish and European project funding.

Two projects will be awarded a cash contribution of up to €750 to support their production budgets and to facilitate the development and implementation of a marketing and distribution strategy for their completed works. In addition, film-based projects will be offered access to facilities at Filmbase and individual consultation on festival strategy and international marketing for short films.

Students interested are invited to attend an Information Session on Tuesday 6th March from 3.30 – 4.30pm in Filmbase. This session will present an overview of the key supports available from Filmbase and CED Ireland, provide key advice for making funding applications, and answer specific questions on this new initiative. Please click here to register for the information session.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Further information is available from Filmbase – please submit queries by email to studentmedia@filmbase.ie

 

 

http://filmireland.net/2018/01/05/festivals-funding-schemes-deadlines-2015/

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Call For: Submissions for Film Offaly/Filmbase Short Film Award

 

The Film Offaly & Filmbase 2018 Short Film Award is now open. Closing date Friday 23rd March @ 3pm. (Postal applications only).

This funding initiative aims to foster creative and resourceful film-making in Co. Offaly and is looking for original, entertaining stories by talented filmmakers, who – if selected – must set and shoot their project in the county.

The award will be given to one successful applicant who will receive €10,000 towards the cost of their production, along with one year’s membership to Filmbase, a 50% discount on equipment hire from Filmbase and more.

 

Closing Date Friday 23rd March 2018 @ 3pm

CLICK HERE TO APPLY

 

 

http://filmireland.net/2018/01/05/festivals-funding-schemes-deadlines-2015/

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‘QED’ Screens at Santa Fe Film Festival

QED, a powerful human rights short directed by Galway actorress Amy-Joyce Hastings will have its international premiere at the 17th Santa Fe Film Festival in February. This will mark Hastings’ third appearance in Santa Fe. She has screened there twice previously as an actor; when Game of Thrones creator George R. R. Martin personally hosted the US premiere of her romantic comedy feature The Callback Queen at his famous Jean Cocteau Cinema, and at the 2016 festival when her participating film Lily won both ‘Best Narrative Short’ and the ‘Courage in Cinema’ Award for its director Graham Cantwell.

Billed as a stylish urban drama with deep emotional resonance, QED tells the story of Jack and Ali – a happily married couple until a terrible accident shatters their perfect world. In the aftermath Ali struggles to accept their new circumstances, while Jack retains hope their lives will return to normal. As the difficulties of their daily reality grind them down, Jack finds emotional solace in a flirtation with work colleague Claudia, while Ali is increasingly left alone with home carer Maria. Ali’s emotional distress meanwhile manifests ever more frequently in dangerous episodes. Just as Jack finally comes to accept things as they are and commits himself to do better, Ali has reached her own conclusion about the future and puts their love to the test. Exploring the theme of sacrificial love, QED poses the ultimate question, ‘What won’t love do?’

 

QED premiered at the 29th Galway Film Fleadh and screened at the Kerry Film Festival and the Richard Harris International Film Festival in Limerick late last year. Says Hastings about the film, “QED is ostensibly a drama exploring love and fidelity but it is at its core a complex human rights issue that will become more prevalent in our society as we live longer. I approached the film from the perspective of being a prisoner in your own body. As a society we deny people their human rights in determining on their own behalf whether they want to live like that. We meet two active, sexual, successful characters – take all that away and their marriage as they knew it is destroyed, but their love remains. Agápē – a love that is prepared to sacrifice itself for a higher purpose. She loves him and so doesn’t want to condemn him to a lifetime of celibate caretaking. He loves her and wants to release her, but feels it’s an impossible ask… What won’t love do? Can you ask someone you love to suffer; to sacrifice their own life to look after you; to live with your death on their conscience? Can you set them free even if it would destroy you? The ending is deliberately ambiguous. I leave it to the individual viewer to interpret. My entire thesis with QED is about the individual’s right to decide, not society’s right to superimpose their decision onto somebody who’s physically incapable of determining their own future. It’s a hard, emotive subject, but I think it is the role of art to shine a light on difficult topics.”

 

The film was co-written by Hastings and lead actor Michael O’Kelly (Red Rock). It stars Donna Anita Nikolaisen – best known for her role as Ama Chisenga in Fair City – as Ali, with prolific actors Norma Sheahan (Handsome Devil) and Charlene Gleeson (Penny Dreadful) cast in the other principal roles.

 

QED is Hastings’ fourth short film behind the lens. In July 2016 she wrote & directed Body of Christ, a micro short commissioned by the Galway Film Centre. Body of Christ won ‘Best One Minute Film’ at the 7th Underground Cinema Film Festival, 2nd place at the 28th Galway Film Fleadh’s ‘One Minute Film Festival’. The film was also nominated for the Micro Cinema Award at the Blackbird Film Festival in New York last year and is nominated at the upcoming Sky Television’s Short Film Show Awards later this year. Previous shorts as writer/director include Hear Me Now and Nocturne Passage.

QED was shot on various locations in and around Dublin. Trisha Flood, Danielle Collins, Jannik Ohlendieck and Michael O’Kelly produced, with Alan Fitzpatrick, Graham Cantwell and Alice Mansergh as Executive Producers for Filmbase and Film Venture. The multinational crew includes Czech cinematographer Jaro Waldeck as Director of Photography, with TV3 Fashionista Sonja Mohlich as Costume Designer, Marina Granville as Key Makeup and Hair Artist, and Jessica Timlin and Alekson Lacerda Dall’Armellina on production design. The score was created by two time Emmy nominated composer Joseph Conlan and post production sound was headed up by Dean Jones at Raygun Sound.

Amy-Joyce Hastings, Co-writer & Director of ‘QED’

 

 

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Introduction to the US Television Landscape for Irish Producers and Writers

 

 

Filmbase and Screen Training Ireland have launched Introduction to the US Television Landscape for Irish Producers and Writers with Des Doyle, writer/director of the feature documentary Showrunners: The Art Of Running A TV Show and co-author of the film’s companion book.  This one day seminar will have a limited number of places in order to encourage an interactive environment.

The training initiative is being launched with Des Doyle, the writer/director behind ‘Showrunners: The Art Of Running A TV Show’, who is also co-writer of the companion book.

It is designed for producers and writers who want to deepen their understanding of the US Television landscape, and takes place Tuesday August 29th at Filmbase, Dublin.

The deadline for applications is 10:00, Tuesday August 15th.

Topics

Detailed breakdown of all the major US Networks – how they tier out (broadcast, cable, premium cable etc) what they are currently programming and what their brands/audiences are.
Detailed study of Pilot Season 2017 – what was ordered, what sold and why that was?
What talent/s were involved and where does this take the Nets programming in the future.
Discussion on Peak TV and Streaming services (Netflix, Hulu, Amazon) and their impact on U.S. programming and opportunities they present.
Network – Studio – Writer relationship, Pod deals and Shingles, Studio restrictions/obligations.
Breakdown of the Writers Year – Pilot, Staffing, Development, Buying and where are the windows for Irish writers.
Representation via either Management or Agency and the difference between the two.

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dlr First Frames Scheme

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logo   Filmbase Logo

 

 

dlr First Frames scheme is a unique opportunity to encourage filmmakers to create exciting, dynamic and engaging screen stories. Its aim is to provide funding and support to emerging filmmakers looking to develop ambitious and creative short films based in the Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown (DLR) region. Filmmakers are encouraged to be ambitiously bold in their storytelling, and to use the diversity and variety of locations available in DLR as background and inspiration for original, vibrant films.

 

This scheme is fully funded by Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council Arts Office and dlr Local Enterprise Office, and managed by Filmbase.  Additional equipment and facilities support is provided by the National Film School, IADT.

First Frames welcomes a diversity of filmmaking styles, themes and creative approaches. The principle requirements are good stories, and a passionate vision for filmmaking. The goal is to open the door to new and emerging Irish film talents.

Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council’s purpose in promoting this opportunity is to support emerging filmmakers to make vibrant and compelling films and to increase awareness of the variety and flexibility of locations available in the region.

Funding will be available through the scheme to support two short films with budgets of up to €10,000 each, with additional equipment and facilities support from Filmbase and IADT valued at up to €10,000 per project.

dlr Arts Office and Filmbase will host an information evening for interested applicants on Monday 20 March in the Studio, dlr LexIcon, Haigh Terrace, Moran Park, Dún Laoghaire.  This will include an introduction to the scheme along with some industry speakers. Filmmakers interested in attending can find additional information, and register to attend, at:

www.filmbase.ie/dlr-first-frames

 

Looking for funding?  Want to submit your work to festivals? Keep an eye on upcoming deadlines here.

 

 

 

 

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Info Session on Short Film Funding Opportunities

 

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Filmbase’s next #GetIntoFilm information evening will take place at Filmbase on Monday 13th February on short film funding opportunities for filmmakers in Ireland.

Filmbase are hosting an information evening on funding opportunities for short filmmakers in Ireland. There are a significant number of short film schemes and funds available to filmmakers in Ireland in 2017 supporting a range of live action, animation, documentary and experimental film projects.

These opportunities include those from Filmbase, broadcasters, Film Commissions and regional Arts Offices, the Arts Council and the Irish Film Board. The information session will be an opportunity to outline the aims and objectives of funds which are available this year and to highlight the key requirements of each one.

Other funds will also be covered in the session.

The Information session takes place at Filmbase on Monday 13th February from 19:00 – 20:30. Places are limited and must be reserved in advance. Filmmakers can register their interest in attending by emailing info@filmbase.ie

 

Looking for funding?  Want to submit your work to festivals? Keep an eye on upcoming deadlines here.

 

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Writers, Producers, Directors Tús Initiative 2017

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Filmbase is seeking applicants for a one year Tús Programme sponsored support initiative for those who are unemployed and on the Live Register. The programme will provide a supportive environment for highly motivated individuals to develop their own work opportunities in creative industries.

Filmbase are looking for applicants who meet the criteria for Tús sponsorship and who have the demonstrable potential to develop their skills as freelance Writers, Producers or Directors. We are seeking to identify, nurture and support 12 participants who have a genuine ability to develop projects and skills which may be commercially feasible as film, television or transmedia projects.
The programme will provide a structured environment which will support dynamic and creative individuals, under supervision and guidance, to develop their practical skills, industry awareness, employability, and practical project development.

Filmbase will provide support the programme through targeted training, access to shared office resources, production equipment, mentoring and networking opportunities.

Supports will include:

• A city centre, shared unit incubation hot desk office
• Access to film and video production equipment
• Access to film and video editing facilities
• High speed internet access, suitable for large video file uploading
• Access to industry specific software, including Final Draft, Final Cut Pro X, Movie Magic Budgeting, Movie Magic Scheduling and the Adobe Creative Media Suite.
• Access to Filmbase Training Courses under an individually tailored learning plan
• Access to meeting rooms and rehearsal spaces
• Individual one-to-one professional mentorship
• Training in film related software

The development of creative partnerships between participants will also be encouraged as part of the support initiative.

About Tús

Tús is an activation initiative for those who are unemployed and on the Live Register. It is intended to support the work readiness of those who participate.

Eligibility to Participate

Participation in the scheme is open to persons who:
• have been continuously unemployed for at least 12 months and “signing” on a full time basis
• are in receipt of a jobseekers payment from the Department of Social Protection for at least 12 months
• are currently in receipt of Jobseeker’s Allowance

Those who do not meet the above eligibility criteria can not be considered for this scheme.
In addition, applicants who are offered a placement on this scheme will need to be approved by their local Department of Social Protection case officer upon selection.

What will Participation Mean for Your Social Welfare Entitlements?

The Tús rates of payment will be equivalent to your existing Jobseeker’s Allowance plus a top-up rate of €22.50 per week, with a minimum payment of €210.50.
You will retain all other Social Welfare Entitlements that you currently qualify for.

Can I Undertake Additional Work?

While on Tús, participants will be able to undertake additional commercial employment and will be supported to pursue this. However, your additional work must not interfere with your Tús commitments and you must contact the Revenue Commissioners with regard to any other work undertaken to ensure tax compliance, etc.
While participating on Tús, it is open to participants to terminate their contract if offered alternative commercial employment or training opportunities.

How Is This Tús Programme Organised

The Filmbase Writers, Producers, Directors Tús programme is a joint initiative of Filmbase and the Ballyfermot / Chapelizod Partnership. The placements run at Filmbase with the support and assistance of the Ballyfermot / Chapelizod Partnership through their Local Employment Services Network. Additional administrative and liaison support for all participants will be provided by Ballyfermot LESN who will monitor and report on programme and individual progress to the DSP.

How To Apply

If you meet the eligibility criteria outlined above and wish to be considered for this programme please apply by 5pm, Friday 17th February with the following information:

1. >Completed Online Application Form
2. Letter outlining your professional development goals for the year, if supported through the programme
3. Current, up-to-date CV
4. Links to sample work(s) already produced
Your application must clearly identify whether you wish to be supported as a Writer, Producer or Director.
Applications must apply online by clicking: Online Application Form
Please do not send hardcopy applications.
Shortlisted applicants will be invited for interview and selected applicants will be offered a place, subject to approval by their DSP Case Officer, beginning in March/April 2017 for 12 months.

Additional Information

Additional information on the Tús programme can be found on the Department of Social Protection website at:
http://www.welfare.ie/en/Pages/T%C3%BAs_holder.aspx
Additional information on Filmbase can be found through the Filmbase website at:
www.filmbase.ie
Additional information on Ballyfermot Local Employment Services Network can be found at:
http://www.ballyfermotpartnership.ie/employment/

For general enquiries about participation in the Writers, Producers, Directors Tús initiative please email tus@filmbase.ie

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Close Up – Development Scheme for Actors @ Filmbase

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Filmbase Talent Development Scheme

Filmbase have announced the second in a series of talent development schemes for actors. Close Up is a professional development programme for actors at Filmbase.

The programme is open to actors who wish to engage in a series of workshops with a range of professional directors working across film and television projects. The studio will run on Tuesday evenings and actors will work with a different director each week, adding up to a unique series of professional workshops.
Close Up is intended as a programme for actors who are developing their screen careers and can benefit from focused professional feedback on craft technique. Participants must have some existing credits or recognised professional training in order to apply. It is not a traditional acting course and is not suitable for beginners.

Each workshop will be led by a different director, ensuring that all participating actors gain a valuable experience working with a range of different professionals and gaining an insight into the different ways directors communicate and prepare actors for scenes.
Directors taking part will be announced shortly.

Application Process:

Actors wishing to take part are invited to submit an application before 5PM Thursday 26th Jan 2017.

To apply you will need:
1. Completed Online Application Form
2. Your professional CV and headshot
3. Showreel/Scenes
4. Filmbase membership number
Application is open to all members of Filmbase and places are fully sponsored. Studio blocks will run on six week rotations, beginning Tuesday 14th of Feb 2017 until Tuesday 21st March. There will be a limited number of places available per studio block to ensure a high quality of experience for all taking part.

Selection Criteria:

Spaces on the programme are limited to 16. Application to the programme does not guarantee a place. In the event that applications exceed the number of places available, priority will be given to emerging actors with feature film, television, commercial or short film experience in professional productions. Showreel scenes will be required as proof of existing experience. Actors who have completed advanced training in screen acting will be considered on the basis of showreel scenes shot as part of their training.

The final pool of actors selected for the programme will be chosen by a panel.
This is professional development workshop series. It is not a traditional acting class and is not suitable for beginners.

Taking Part:

You will be notified by 5pm, Thursday 2nd Feb 2017 if you are being offered a place on the programme.
Once you confirm your place we will ask you to fully commit to attending all modules in your block to allow for programme continuity and planning of exercises. If you will not be able to attend all modules we would kindly ask you to decline your place to allow someone else to attend. You will not lose your place on the programme if you do so and your place will carry forward to a future studio block.

Actors must be 18 or over to take part.
You must be available to take part in all six modules.
Although the there is no application fee you must be a Filmbase member to apply.
Details on Filmbase membership can be found HERE>

Topics:

− Script Breakdown & Analysis
− Finding Your Unique Voice/Being Authentic
− Getting Clarity of Vision
− Articulating Your Vision
− Being The Actor
− Working With Directors
− Actors/Directors Tool Kit
− Creating An Honest Moment/Performance
− Auditioning & Casting
− Rehearsals: The Different Approaches
− Getting Your Work Seen

Directors Dates:

TBC – 14th Feb, 7pm until 10pm

TBC – 21st Feb, 7pm until 10pm

TBC – 28th Feb, 7pm until 10pm

TBC – 7th Mar, 7pm until 10pm

TBC – 14th Mar, 7pm until 10pm

TBC – 21st Mar, 7pm until 10pm

***ACTORS MUST BE AVAILABLE TO ATTEND ALL SIX EVENINGS IN ORDER TO APPLY***

Online Application Form:

https://form.jotformeu.com/63484541279363

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Close Up: New Talent Development Scheme for Actors at Filmbase

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Filmbase has announced the first in a series of talent development schemes for actors. Close Up is a professional development programme for actors at Filmbase.

The programme is open to actors who wish to engage in a series of workshops with a range of professional directors working across film and television projects. The studio will run on Tuesday evenings and actors will work with a different director each week, adding up to a unique series of professional workshops.

Close Up is intended as a programme for actors who are developing their screen careers and can benefit from focused professional feedback on craft technique. Participants must have some existing credits or recognised professional training in order to apply. It is not a traditional acting course and is not suitable for beginners.

Each workshop will be led by a different director, ensuring that all participating actors gain a valuable experience working with a range of different professionals and gaining an insight into the different ways directors communicate and prepare actors for scenes.
Directors taking part will include Lisa Mulcahy (THE LEDGEND OF LONGWOOD, REDROCK), Kieron J Walsh ( THE SAVAGE EYE, JUMP, RAPT), Nick Kelly (DELPHINE, WHY THE IRISH DANCE THAT WAY, SHOE), Johnny Gogan (THE LAST BUS HOME, MAPMAKER, BLACK ICE), Frank Berry (TEENAGE CICS, BALLYMUM LULLABY, I USED TO LIVE) and Louise Ní Fhiannachta (RÚBAÍ, EIPIC, ROS NA RÚN).

Application Process:
Actors wishing to take part are invited to submit an application before 5PM Thursday 3rd November.
To apply you will need:
1. Completed Online Application Form
2. Your professional CV and headshot
3. Showreel/Scenes
4. Filmbase membership number
Application is open to all members of Filmbase and places are fully sponsored. Studio blocks will run on six week rotations, beginningTuesday 8th of November 2016 until Tuesday 13th December. There will be a limited number of places available per studio block to ensure a high quality of experience for all taking part.

Selection Criteria:
Spaces on the programme are limited to 16. Application to the programme does not guarantee a place. In the event that applications exceed the number of places available, priority will be given to emerging actors with feature film, television, commercial or short film experience in professional productions. Showreel scenes will be required as proof of existing experience. Actors who have completed advanced training in screen acting will be considered on the basis of showreel scenes shot as part of their training.
The final pool of actors selected for the programme will be chosen by a panel.
This is professional development workshop series. It is not a traditional acting class and is not suitable for beginners.

Taking Part:
You will be notified by 5pm, Friday 4th November if you are being offered a place on the programme.
Once you confirm your place we will ask you to fully commit to attending all modules in your block to allow for programme continuity and planning of exercises. If you will not be able to attend all modules we would kindly ask you to decline your place to allow someone else to attend. You will not lose your place on the programme if you do so and your place will carry forward to a future studio block.

Actors must be 18 or over to take part.
You must be available to take part in all six modules.
Although the there is no application fee you must be a Filmbase member to apply.

Topics:
− Script Breakdown & Analysis
− Finding Your Unique Voice
− Getting Clarity of Vision
− Articulating Your Vision
− Being the Actor
− Working with Directors
− Shooting & Reviewing Scenes
− Actors/Directors Tool Kit
− Creating an Honest Moment/Performance
− Auditioning & Casting
− Rehearsals: The Different Approaches
− Getting Your Work Seen

Directors Dates:
Lisa Mulcahy – 8th Nov, 7pm until 10pm
Kieron J Walsh – 15th Nov, 7pm until 10pm
Nick Kelly – 22nd Nov, 7pm until 10pm
Johnny Gogan – 29th Nov, 7pm until 10pm
Frank Berry – 6th Dec, 7pm until 10pm
Louise Ní Fhiannachta – 13th Dec, 7pm until 10pm

***ACTORS MUST BE AVAILABLE TO ATTEND ALL SIX EVENINGS TO APPLY***
For more information and link to the online application form check out:
www.filmbase.ie<http://www.filmbase.ie>

 

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Interview: Greg Sestero, co-star of cult film ‘The Room’ & author of the ‘The Disaster Artist’

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Ahead of his appearance at Filmbase, Gemma Creagh talked to Greg Sestero, co-star of cult film The Room. Greg is also the best-selling author of the The Disaster Artist, a memoir of his time as an aspiring actor in Hollywood, leading to his bizarre friendship with the mysterious and iconoclastic director of The Room, Tommy Wiseau. The Disaster Artist garnered critical acclaim and commercial success with the book recently being released in the U.K by Little Brown and also adapted into the film, The Masterpiece by director James Franco.

 

First off, how did you meet Tommy Wiseau?

I met Tommy in acting classes in San Francisco. It was quite a conservative class. People were quite reserved. When Tommy went up there, he performed a Shakespearean sonnet that was so mind-blowing I thought, ‘I got to do a thing with this guy’. And so I approached him. That’s how we met.

So, you were obviously friends with him when he was working on The Room. How did you become involved?

We were roommates when he was writing. He always wanted to be an actor and Hollywood didn’t really  see his talents, so he decided to write his own screenplay. He wrote a part for me to be in it. At first, I was reluctant. Then the night before filming he made me an offer I couldn’t refuse – if I didn’t make the movie it would be the biggest mistake of my life.

With regards his writing process, how did he come up with his ideas?

I think he was inspired by his own personal stories and the way he sees life. He’s also very much into ’50s films, Tennessee Williams, Marlon Brando and James Dean – I think The Room was a culmination of all that and his perspective on life.

How involved were you in the filmmaking process itself?

I just pretty much helped to Tommy carry out his vision. It was his vision from the start and I was just there to support him. I never really wanted to change any aspect of it. I felt it would work a lot better for him if he just did it his way. I was just kind of there to pick up the pieces and make sure the whole thing went forward.

I know there were a lot of last-minute rewrites, what was the mood like onset?.

It was the first time making a movie so there was chaos and some dysfunction – and a lot of humour! A lot of things happened that were pretty funny, looking back. Ultimately, it was Tommy trying to make a movie his way and a bunch of people trying to understand that.

What was it like when it all blew up as a cult phenomenon?

I observed the film for a few years after it came out and film students picked it up and started spreading it. A few years later, I was living in Europe when the movie really blew up. I was stunned to know it was playing in places like New York and London to sold-out crowds. It was intriguing for me, despite being in the movie, just how people were responding to this vision that Tommy had of this drama. They loved it for all these different reasons. Soon enough I was attending screenings with Tommy. I came to Dublin and was in London – there’s something about the film that people love.

One of those things that struck me about The Room is that there’s authenticity there; there is real emotion behind it.

There really is something there. I think that it’s the fact that he was really trying to send a message through his film. People can see that and they respond to that.

Let’s talk about your book The Disaster Artist – how did that come about?

With the cult success and the touring, I was getting a lot of questions about how I got involved in the film and my relationship with Tommy. I thought the best way to tell the story was for me to go to the beginning and share what a crazy and surreal journey it was meeting Tommy, our unique friendship and how it led to the both of us stumbling our way into this cult success; what it is like to have a dream and try to pursue it against all odds. I thought there’s a lot more there than just the making of a cult movie. My goal with it was to really share something that had heart and humour as well.

So how did the James Franco ‘The Masterpiece’ adaptation come about from your book?

James read it and wrote a terrific article in his column about what he liked both about the book and The Room. He got it and wanted to turn it into a film. I have been lucky enough to see a cut of the film and it’s really terrific. I’m just grateful that someone with James’ talent saw the message the book was sending.

Is it strange to see another actor play yourself as an actor playing a role in a film?

It was a pretty fascinating and surreal experience. But with the book I always saw it as a film, so I removed myself from myself at that time. It was more exciting than anything else. It’s taking your story and putting it in another dimension – it’s very freeing in a lot of ways… it’s no longer your story. It’s great therapy actually. I recommend it!

What can you tell us about the documentary you are screening on Tuesday here at Filmbase in Dublin.

It is a short documentary with interviews with all the actors about the making of the movie and it becoming a cult phenomenon, and the fans. It gives you a well-rounded perspective of what it was like to be inside The Room. Also, I’ll be doing a book reading and, hopefully, I’ll be showing a big surprise to the Dublin fans of something new.

Voicesonfilm in association with Filmbase and NUI Galway present The Disaster Artist: Inside The Room with Greg Sestero at Filmbase @ 7pm, Tuesday, 27th September 2016.

 

 

 

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Reel Art Information Session at Filmbase

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Film artists interested in applying for Reel Art are invited to attend an information session on the scheme on Tuesday 6th September at 3pm in Filmbase, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2. This session will outline the purpose and priorities of the award and will answer questions on the scheme. Anyone interested in attending is required to register their interest by sending an email to reelart@filmbase.ie<mailto:reelart@filmbase.ie>.

Launched in 2008, Reel Art is designed to provide film artists with a unique opportunity to make highly creative, imaginative and experimental documentaries on an artistic theme.  Operated in association with Filmbase and the Audi Dublin International Film Festival, Reel Art will wholly support two films with grants of €70-€80,000 per project.  Reel Art films will premiere at the Dublin International Film Festival in February 2018. The deadline for receipt of applications is Friday 7th October 2016 at 5pm.

The Arts Council’s purpose in offering the Reel Art scheme is to support film artists to make documentary art films that would not otherwise get made. A key aim of the scheme is to complement, rather than replicate, the documentary and other funding programmes offered by the Arts Council, broadcasters and funding agencies in Ireland.

Reel Art projects should be conceived for theatrical exhibition at film festivals and in arthouse cinema settings.  Only proposals for original, imaginative and aesthetically-driven treatments of arts subjects will be considered. Proposals that offer visually engaging, creative and experimental approaches to their subject will be prioritised.

Updated guidelines for Reel Art 2016, together with application forms for the scheme are available for download from the website www.<http://www.reelart.ie>filmbase.ie/reelart as are details of previous Reel Art projects.

 

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The Teen Actors Summer Programme – (Level 1) 5 Days @Filmbase

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4th July – 8th July 2016, 5 Days, Mon – Fri,

(14yrs – 17yrs)

Cost: €180

Time: 10.00am – 4.00pm

The Teen Actors Summer Programme is a five day workshop. This class provides teen actors the opportunity to tailor their work for the camera.

During the programme teens will cover commercials, auditions, scene work, and other exercises highlight the different technical skills and adjustments required to cultivate a film/TV performance.

The course will cover:

Acting for camera
Cold readings
Scene work
Monologues
Commercials
Improvisation

Students are introduced to the world of a creative artist and scenes are practiced and critiqued to better understand how to apply all on-camera media in a fun and relaxed environment.

Who should apply:

This 5-day course is ideal for teens (14yrs – 17yrs) who have an interest in acting and feel they would like to explore the world of acting at a beginner level.

Dates:

4th July – 8th July, 5 Days, Mon – Fri

Class times:

10am – 4pm

Pricing:

€180
€100 Deposit

Add Teen Actors Level 2 (Tues 2nd Aug – Fri 5th Aug, 10am until 5pm) for a total cost €330.

Location:

Filmbase, Temple Bar, Curved street

To book your place, contact Filmbase Reception on 01 679 6716 and dial 0.
For more information, email our Training Department at training@filmbase.ie.

 

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Tips: Producing A Short Film: In Three Simple, Difficult Steps

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Barry’s Bespoke Bakery (produced by Ben Keenan)

 

Ahead of his weekend course at Filmbase (18th & 19th June 2016), producer Ben Keenan shares three things you need to get right when producing a short film. 

Making a short film is hard, but going through all of that work without getting these things right would be a real shame…

 

1. The Right Script

The right script is better than the best script – choose something that suits your abilities, resources and sensibilities. Find out what kind of film you want to make and choose something fully do-able. A small victory is even better than a genuinely noble failure since it can show you parts of the process only available to filmmakers who finish films. When making a documentary, there should still be a script or vision for the finished film.

 

 

2. The Right Director

A functional and productive director-producer relationship is an expensive investment, so you should choose someone you can work with again. Often the script and the director come as a package, so make the decision based on both, with one eye on the proposed project and another on what you think it would be like to work with them again.

 

 

3. The Right Budget

Perhaps a little controversially, sometimes this is zero. Dollar-signed bags of other people’s money come with perfectly reasonable strings attached. If you are trying something experimental or trying to learn the craft, you are likely better off making something with little to no money. More freedom, lower cost on your mistakes, less visibility. You can also get a protracted shooting schedule which teaches discipline in continuity and allows you to review and digest footage as you proceed. As long as it’s a valuable learning experience for everyone on the crew and they know what they’re signing up for, it’ll be a fair proposition.

 

Producing a Short Film – With Ben Keenan
18th & 19th June, 1 weekend

Filmbase, Temple Bar, Dublin 2

€175 Members / €200 Non-Members

Do you want to know what it takes to produce a short film? This course is designed for anyone setting out to make their first short film.

Intro:

Do you want to know what it takes to produce a short film? Producing a Short returns to Filmbase with experienced Producer, Ben Keenan (Barry’s Bespoke Bakery, The Chronoscope). Using successful short films as case studies, this course is theory based with some practical exercises. It is the ideal course for first-time filmmakers.

 

Course Content:

  • Relationship between Producer and Director
  • What a Director looks for in a Producer
  • Production Department – Who’s who?
  • Pre-production meetings
  • Short Films – Award Schemes
  • Legal Issues for Short Films
  • Script breakdown
  • Scheduling
  • Casting
  • Post-Production
  • Film Festivals

 

Ben Keenan

In 2009 Ben Keenan directed his first feature film, a comedy titled The rise of the Bricks, starring Emmett Scanlan, Eoin Macken, Ciaran McNamee, Cillian Scott and Cathal Sheahan. Since then he has gone on to work as a Development Executive for Fastnet Films and a Digital Content Producer in BK Media. He also produced and developed online comedy as Half a Giraffe.

Short films Ben has produced, including Barry’s Bespoke Bakery (Irish Film Board), The Chronoscope and This is Not A Conspiracy Theory (RTÉ), have screened at festivals around the world, including The Galway Film Fleadh, Eat My Shorts, The Underground Film Festival London, The Capital Irish Film Festival Washington, The International Film Festival Molodist in the Ukraine, The Charlie Chaplin Film Festival in Kerry and the Darklight festival.

 

Dates:

  • 18th & 19th June, 1 weekend

Class times:

  • Sat 10.30 – 5.00 & Sun 11.00 – 5.30

Pricing:

  • €175 Members / €200 Non-Members
  • €100 Deposit

Location:

  • Filmbase, Temple Bar, Curved street

 

To book your place, contact Filmbase Reception on 01 679 6716 and dial 0. For more information, email our training department at training@filmbase.ie. Please read our Terms & Conditions before booking a course.

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Call For: Applications for Pitching Forum for Co-Production Projects

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Screen Talent Europe and Filmbase in collaboration with The Norwegian Short Film Festival invite emerging producers, directors and screenwriters from Northern Europe to pitch new short film and documentary projects at the festival in Grimstad, Norway, June 8th – 12th 2016.

To participate you must apply one of the Screen Talent Europe partners. It is free to participate and the costs of transportation and accommodation will be covered by Screen Talent Europe.

The best pitch will receive a prize. The reward is film equipment for production, postproduction facilities and a cash production grant of 50.000 NOK (5300 €).

10-14 short films and documentary projects will be pitched during the Pitching Forum. In a 5-minute pitch, each participant will present their project to a pitching jury and an audience of potential co-producers, co-financiers and filmmakers attending the festival.

Terms:

To participate you must be between 18-30 years old.

Producers, directors and screenwriters must have produced at least 2 films (fiction or documentary).

You must apply with a project in development (fiction or documentary) with a maximum length of 40 min.

The project must be produced through international co-production. This means that the project owner will produce the entire or parts of the project in another country. It´s not a requirement to have a co-producer in another country when you apply, but to get the production grant disbursed, the project must be established as a co-production between two countries.

Application deadline: April 15th 2016

More details can be found on the Screen Talent Europe Website: http://screentalent.eu/pitching-forum.html

 

Looking for funding?  Want to submit your work to festivals. Keep an eye on upcoming deadlines here.

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A Few Things to Consider Before You Start Writing Your TV Drama

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Ahead of her Writing for TV Drama course at Filmbase, which runs over 8 Wednesday evenings from 30th March – 18th May, tutor Eilish Kent suggests things to consider before you start writing your TV drama.

 

Ensure your central character is worthy of the screen time:

Renewable series or a franchise is the golden goose of TV Drama and something all TV channels want constantly; to create series that can engage an audience beyond season one you must create characters that audiences will want to watch, either for their great mastery (of some skill or talent) or for the incredible and difficult situation they are in, or both. These characters must also have rich backstories, the richer the backstory the more there is to mine for future stories and seasons. Without an interesting central character the series will not have legs, as it is the central character who will generate story by the manner in which they react to the situations they find themselves in.

 

The long emotional arc:

In series, as opposed to singles or features, characters’ arc of transformation is drawn out or never completed, they always have their Achilles heal to deal with and this is why the character retains interest for audience. Once the issue central to their character is resolved there is less at stake.

 

Working within the format:

TV works to prescribed schedules and programmes have precise durations; this means that as a writer you have to write within this structure. Unlike cinema, audiences can easily turn over to another offering, so it is imperative that you grab the audience’s attention and hook them in as quickly as possible.

 

Writing to the hooks:

To keep an audience engaged and wanting more you need to give them a reason to come back after commercial breaks and for the next episode or season; to achieve this, TV is written to the story hooks and breaks.

 

The rules of the world:

Once you have established the rules of the world you can’t break them. You can’t change a character’s true essence to accommodate plot; at the same time, however, you must continuously surprise audience within the context of what you have established.

 

Test the idea:

Before spending time writing your TV series test the idea, ask hard questions of the central characters and the central concept, what makes it interesting for your target audience and how will this endlessly renew itself.

 

Above all never be boring.

 

Eilish works freelance as a story consultant and script editor on film and all TV genre, she can be contacted on eilishkent@gmail.com

 

Course Details

Writing for TV Drama with Eilish Kent

  • 8 Wednesday evenings from 30th March to 18th May, 

€260 Members / €295 Non-Members

Writing Television Drama is a course aimed at writers who are interested in learning more about the fundamental skills of crafting good television drama in all its forms.

 

Intro:

Along with the explosion of high quality television drama over the last decade there has been an increasing diversification of audience viewing patterns. Broadcasters and production companies are increasingly looking for innovative and distinctive drama proposals capable of reaching and attracting large television audiences.

The course is highly recommended for writers who are interested in exploring TV drama as an avenue for their work, but may also appeal to directors and producers seeking a better understanding of television story structure and dynamics.

The course is designed and will be led by Eilish Kent, who worked for the BBC and RTÉ commissioning and developing TV dramas, for over 16 years. She has worked across formats from singles to renewable series, and across genre, from comedy to true life stories. She has brought many first time writers to TV audiences.

 

Course Content:

  • The principles of screenwriting and their application for television drama.
  • The current best practice for submitting drama proposals to broadcasters and television production companies.
  • The commissioning process and broadcaster requirements at the various stages of the development process.
  • The fundamental principles of writing for single and one-off dramas, serials and renewable series.
  • The world of the series and the series ‘Bible’.
  • The importance of research, generating storylines, arcs and plotting.
  • Creating compelling characters, pacing and tone and audience engagement.
  • Different formats and genre.

 

Tutor: Eilish Kent

Projects Eilish managed onto screen for RTÉ include Hardy Bucks, Raw, Fade St, Any Time Now, No Tears (International Emmy for best series or serial), Love Is The Drug (IFTA best series), Fergus Wedding, Paths to Freedom and Foreign Exchange. And for the BBC, Vicious Circle, Rap at the Door and Mezzone (RTS winner). She devised and managed StoryLand, a unique project when launched that saw 28 original online series produced. Prior to her work in TV, Eilish was an actor’s agent in London and worked in marketing for Oxford University Press. She is a graduate of EAVE and North by Northwest. She has a BA in English and History of Art and an MA in Modern Drama from UCD. Currently she works freelance as a story consultant.

 

To reserve your place on this course, please contact Filmbase Reception on 01 679 6716 and dial 0. For more information, email our Training Department at training@filmbase.ie. Please read our Terms & Conditions before booking a course.

 

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FilmOffaly Award 2016

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FilmOffaly, Offaly’s Film Commission, in association with Filmbase have announced the FilmOffaly Award 2016

This funding initiative aims to foster creative, resourceful filmmaking in the county. FilmOffaly are looking for unique, original short stories/documentaries by talented new filmmakers, professional and novice alike.

The only stipulation is that the filming must take place in Offaly.

There will be one award to one successful applicant. The winning applicant will receive: €8,000 towards the cost of their production/ A local premier/ 1-year’s Filmbase membership to the Writer, Producer and Director of the winning film/A 50% discount on production equipment and/or editing facilities from Filmbase for the project/ Filmbase’s production insurance to cover the shoot. The award will be based on a two stage application process.

 

Application Form and Guidelines can be downloaded from www.filmoffaly.ie

 

Closing date is 3pm Friday 4th March 2016

 

Please read guidelines carefully and ensure that they are followed

 

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Call For: Applications for Short Shots

Short Shots Icon

Short Shots is a new Filmbase/RTÉ New Short Film scheme that doesn’t just fund films, it offers the next generation of filmmakers a programme of development and production support.

Championing Ireland’s diverse and dynamic emerging filmmakers, the scheme offers development support for shortlisted projects, as well as production and distribution support to the eventual greenlit films. People with good ideas should be encouraged to apply regardless of their creative backgrounds. A wide net will be cast to find new writers, producers and directors with a clear sense of visual storytelling and an original voice.

The purpose of Short Shots is to stimulate a truly independent and unique approach to creative filmmaking. Through this scheme, Filmbase and RTÉ are looking for ambitious films and authentic stories that will excite and resonate with audiences.

The culmination of the programme will be the opportunity of producing a short film with a production budget of €10,000 in astimulative and supportive environment.

 

Deadline for application to participate:

5PM Thurs 28th Jan 2016

More information can be found on the Filmbase website:

http://filmbase.ie/short-shots-filmbaserte-new-short-film-scheme/#.VnmUZraLTcs

 

Looking for funding?  Want to submit your work to festivals. Keep an eye on all the upcoming deadlines here.

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Experimental Film Society at Filmbase

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Experimental Film Society (EFS) have announced a new partnership with Filmbase, Dublin. EFS will programme and present a bimonthly series of experimental cinema events at Filmbase consisting of screenings and performances by both EFS members and guest artists.

The first of these, taking place on November 27th 2015, not only launches this new series but also marks the 50th EFS event since it first began programming screenings in 2011. To celebrate this double occasion Michael Higgins and Cillian Roche will be bringing the raw power of their pop-up expanded cinema project Open Night Cinema from the post-industrial margins that spawned it to the city centre for one night only. This will be followed by a drinks reception enriched by the experimental sounds of Cork-based DJ duo Glocke & Aaaa (Dave Murphy and frequent EFS collaborator Vicky Langan).

 

Friday, November 27th 6.30pm
Tickets €7 at the door.
Filmbase, Curved Street ,Temple Bar Dublin 2.

JUNK (Michael Higgins/Cillian Roche) (6:30-7:30PM)

Inspired by Dublin’s derelict industrial locations, JUNK is an immersive installation that incorporates analogue projection, a live soundscape and physical performance. JUNK will highlight and recreate in an abstract, intensely atmospheric way the recesses of these toxic environments and the characters that feed on them.

JUNK emerges from the Open Night Cinema Project. Set up in June 2015 by performer Cillian Roche and filmmaker Michael Higgins, it is a non-profit ‘pop-up’ film studio that lives, breathes and sleeps throughout the industrial landscapes of Dublin. It primarily feeds on cinematic events designed with characteristics of expanded cinema, experimental film and live performance. These events utilise the zone outside the projected frame in order to breathe life into the cinematic experience. Throughout the year, it has been host to a range of events that blur the lines between art installation, cinematic exhibition and live performance.

GLOCKE & AAAA DJ SET (8:00-9:30PM)

Vicky Langan and Dave Murphy spin avant junk and weirdo sounds. They are known as the duo that gave Cork Black Sun, its regular weirdo / outer limits music event which brought many renowned makers of strange sounds from around the world to play for the first time in Ireland. The same adventurous sensibility permeates their DJ sets.

 

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Interview: Dub Web Fest

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Ahead of this weekend’s Dub Web Fest (20 – 22 November) Film Ireland caught up with of the organisers behind the festival.

Dub Web Fest is a celebration of the storytelling power of the Internet. 2015 is the inaugural festival, which will bring together the movers and makers of the digital media and tech worlds to celebrate creative, collaborative opportunities. 20 – 22 November will see Filmbase, the main venue, filled with youtubers and content creators all thanks to the vision of Mikael Thiery, the festival director, and Erol Mustafov, his co-director.

Before envisioning the Dub Web Fest, Erol had been running Videography.ie for 5 years, which provides predominantly video production services, as well as working as a freelance camera operator, cinematographer and editor on various projects, including commercial videos, film, and documentary and web series. Meanwhile Mikael has been living in Dublin for 8 years; he produced and directed his first Irish short film (Joe Drummer) which was selected in Dingle and Chicago and has also been working as photographer, production assistant on various projects. We got the opportunity to ask them both some questions about this brand new festival.

 

Where did the idea to organise The Dublin Web Fest come from?

Mikael: In 2013 I co-produced and directed the comedy web series titled “Ash Airways”. It was selected for the LA Web Fest 2014 and for the web forum in Paris (Cross Video Days). Back in Dublin I felt that something was missing… An Irish web fest.

 

What is it about specifically about the format of the web series that inspired you to do this?

Erol: The way we consume media now happens pretty quick, using various electronic devices, apart from the TV set. The web series format is ideal for the ‘time poor’ society today. The format is short, snappy and dynamic in most cases, which makes it ideal for web viewing. Many filmmakers today, who were predominantly doing films, have jumped on the idea and format of web series, which gives them quite a lot of benefits, with the main one being, quick and instant exposure of their work online.

Mikael: As Erol mentioned the way people watch TV changed for ever. A quick question – How many videos do you watch on a daily basis on your smart phone? maybe 5 ? 10? How many times do you go to the Cinema? once or twice a week? Do not make me wrong. I love Cinema and Cinema will remain the greatest art form ever created. In the US, producers and filmmakers have been working on the web series format for years. The reason? The Audience spend more time on their tablet rather than watching the old fashion TV! The age of Smart TV has arrived.

 

How did you get everyone on board and what was the starting process like?

Erol: I mainly followed the passion and inspiration of Mikael, the founder of the festival and I think the rest of the team did the same. It was hard to start the process, but luckily we were able to see some of the process of existing web festivals and in many cases the process is similar to film festivals.

Mikael: At the beginning you have a concept/idea. Then you talk about it to your close friends. After some passionate talks you have a great team.

 

Is there a genre, style that’s your favourite? And if so, why?

Erol: It is hard to say. Comedy pops up straight away, as 70% of web series content at the minute is comedy. I presume it is to the with the ‘instant’ entertainment effect that most of us seek when we are online. I am also a big sci-fi fan and I was nicely surprised with the quality of work submitted to DubWebFest this year. The sci-fi genre captured me since I was a kid and stayed with me and I think it is to do with the fiction element and the ‘rich imagination’ that it offers.

Mikael: The main genre is definitely comedy. I suppose people prefer to have a laugh during their lunch break. That’s why comedic sketches, gags are omnipresent online. I do appreciate comedy a lot, web documentaries or Drama/ thriller series.  The online docs are really special. The internet does not have any boundary so web doc-makers can explore even deeper topics.

 

How did you pick the varied selection? Did you find any themes emerging?

Erol: We did follow certain criteria like creativity, overall execution, story development, character development, actor performances, and various technical aspects like cinematography, sound/music and editing. We rated each criteria so it was easier to process, analyse and assess.

Mikael: Within this fast online ocean called teh internet there are tons of content. So start with is quality. Quality of the story. Quality of characters. Quality of cinematography/sound. The emerging themes would be the online dating, music lovers and people form around the Globe.

 

Were there any surprises along the way?

Erol: I suppose for me the main thing was how well it was received and the support we got. How people were jumping on board when they heard about the idea, whether it be the team, volunteers or partners.

Mikael: Indeed. Nowadays we can communicate through the social media web sites and receive great support like our amazing great web fest partner SF Web Fest.

 

What was the hardest part of the process of creating the festival?

Erol: For me it was the project management bit, there were a lot of ‘what ifs’ and ‘when’ and ‘how’ hanging in the year, as this is the first year of the festival. I am managing the websites, newsletters and various design and communications, and the technical aspects of those could be quite challenging.

Mikael: The process of creating a web fest ihas been challenging since day 1. We had to join our forces to keep moving forward. Keep connecting with people. Confirming. Reconfirming. Meeting partners/ sponsors. But with some passion even the hardest part is alright. It’s for a great cause. Celebrating this great online storytelling.

 

What about the line-up excites you the most?

Erol: I think meeting all the filmmakers from Ireland and abroad is the most exciting part for me, to actually put a ‘face on the name’ if I am correct with that expression. We have been chatting with many directors, producers and actors and it would be amazing to see them all in Filmbase. Of course, I am also looking forward to all the masterclasses, workshops and panels we have lined up.

Mikael: To see the Dublin Web Fest happening. Meeting the series makers, producers from everywhere. From Australia to USA through Lebanon, UK, France, Ireland, etc. Many people want to flock to Dublin to showcase their shows, have great talks, exchanges and enjoy great parties.

 

What about next year, is there going to be another one? And if so, any plans already?

Erol: Yes, we are planning to make it an annual event and more than that. We are going to keep it active also throughout the year with various other events and there are some nice surprises coming along the way right after the festival, which I can’t share right now.

Mikael: Next year, it will be year 2. The online web community is growing so we never know what’s going to happen. But we plan some amazing surprises. Do you want to jump into the Online Storytelling Game?

 

 

The Dub Web Fest takes place 20 – 22 November 2015 at Filmbase

 

 

 

 

 

 

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‘Fading Away’ Premieres @ Cork Film Festival

3 Fading Away Antonia Campbell Hughes

Fading Away is set to premiere at the Cork Film Festival (6 – 15 November 2015) on Saturday, 14th November. The film was made as part of the MSc. Digital Feature Film Production at Filmbase, which places an emphasis on practical filmmaking to prepare students for a future in film production.

Fading Away is described as a “psychological horror”, telling the story of Leila, the fearsome front-woman of a struggling rock band who has a diehard belief that her music will change the world. After meeting a mysterious mentor she inadvertently wishes the iconic album ‘Golden Boy’, from the band Double Eagle, out of existence, leaving the music hers for the taking. As she struggles with her music, band and new love, her supernatural mentor proves to be a darker force than she realised.

The successfully crowd-funded film stars Antonia Campbell-Hughes with Kate Stanely Brennan, Emma-Eliza Regan and Mark Huberman, with music by Irish band The Minutes.

The film is directed by Edwina Casey, David Johnston, Lisa Winstanley and produced by Dave Minogue, Grace Coughlan and Andrew Loughran.

 

Fading Away screens 14th November at 20:45 at the Gate Cinema / Book Now

View the full programme for Cork Film Festival 2015. View the digital brochure here.

 

 

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Filmbase at Cork

 

Included amongst the line-up of Irish films at this year’s Cork Film Festival (6 – 15 November) are a number of projects coming out of Filmbase.

 

The Filmbase/RTÉ-funded short film Love is a Sting screens on 7th November at 10.00 as part of  Family Shorts  and in Irish Shorts 4: Dead Heat on 12th November at 13:45.


 
At his lowest point, struggling children’s book writer Harold Finch gains an unexpected house guest in the form of Anabel Shine: a 20 year old, hyper-intelligent mosquito.

 

The Filmbase/RTÉ-funded short film Foxglove screens as part of Irish Shorts 2  on 11th November at 18:45 and again in Ireland on Screen on 15th November at 13:00.

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In the wilds of Connemara, an engineer and his daughter are targeted by an ancient and angry force from within the earth itself.

 

The Filmbase/RTÉ-funded short film Leave screens as part of Irish Shorts 3 on 12th November at 12:00.

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A film about random events and their consequences; a film about how your life can change without warning.

 

The Filmbase Masters feature film Monged screens at Cork Film Festival on 13th November at 15:30.


 
Dave is a wannabe drug dealer stuck with a batch of experimental new pills, Ray is a failing club DJ getting by on a daytime radio slot, and socially awkward office worker Bernard just turned up to the wrong party by mistake. When Dave enlists Bernard’s help to test out his new consignment, the weekend descends into a riotous cocktail of narcotics, booze, clubs and parties. Embarking on a series of drug-fuelled misadventures, the three lads get more from the weekend then they’d ever bargained for.

 

The Filmbase Masters feature film Fading Away screens on 14th November at 20:45.

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Ardi, the front-woman in a struggling rock band, has a die-hard belief that her music will change the world – the problem is finding enough of an audience that agrees.

 

Click here for info on all the Irish feature films screening at this year’s festival.

View the full programme for Cork Film Festival 2015.

View the digital brochure here.

 

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5 Tips to Improve Your Comedy

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Comic performer and writer Michelle Read shares 5 tips to help improve your comedy stylings ahead of Filmbase’s upcoming Screen Studio Academy: Actors Intensive Lab (20th October – 26th November)

 

Stop Press: Actors are Funny

Comedy work is hilarious* and fun and a great way for actors to develop their performance skills. It helps to unlock or identify some of the experience actors already have, including comic characterisation, timing and ensemble playing.

(*disclaimer – may not be hilarious.)

 

Improv Funny

Comedy Improv is an exciting and dynamic performance format and centres around the idea of play. It’s a fun (and scary) way to explore comedy performance and the spontaneous creation of comic material. It also focuses on teamwork and game structure. It can sometimes feel like jumping in a volcano*.

(*In the metaphorical exciting sense, not in the literal burning to death sense.)

 

Sketch Funny

Many comedy makers then work with improv to create material for sketches. Spontaneous ideas and characters are explored on the floor and / or written down until a text exists that can be rehearsed. This is a process that may be familiar to actors from devising work and it allows a deeper exploration of the processes in performing comedy. Yes, you have become a comedy writer as well as a comedy performer.

 

Stand Up Funny

And if you’re writing comedy – what about Stand Up? Stand-Up has a daunting reputation but isn’t actually one rigid form. It can include storytelling, monologuing, chatting, slide shows, performing a version of yourself, being a character, riffing on a theme, making a point. Or all of the above. Stand up is a personally created performance piece, with the only caveat that it MUST be funny every ten to twenty seconds. The process of making a piece of stand-up is fantastically challenging and really good for stress levels (and cholesterol). It’s a great way for actors to never be scared of anything else ever again.

 

Don’t be funny, am funny.

Or something like that. It’s a Zen mantra about comedy. Yeah… Really helpful.

 

 

Michelle Read is one of the tutors on Filmbase’s Screen Studio Academy: Actors Intensive Lab

20th October – 26th November, Tuesdays & Thursdays
€380 Members / €420 Non-Members

The Screen Studio Academy Actors’ Intensive Lab is a highly practical course for performers. Participants will learn techniques to successfully engage with audiences as well as explore personal comic presence.

 

Intro:

Are you looking to develop your acting skills? Voice and comedy performance are vital to becoming a versatile and successful actor and knowing how to utilise performance to create dynamic characters is a staple in any actor’s toolbox.  This programme is designed to challenge students who are committed to polishing their abilities to a professional level.

“Acting is not about being someone different. It’s finding the similarity in what is apparently different then finding myself in there.”  – Meryl Streep

This six-week programme will focus on vocal work, sketches and dynamic exercises. Clear precise speech and articulation skills will be developed to improve material delivery.

During the course, students will be immersed in the world of professional performance. Not only does the training run for two evenings per week (Tuesdays and Thursdays), but actors will be expected to set aside time for assignments and developing project work. Participants will also work alongside the Screen Studio Directors and Writers Academy courses at Filmbase to collaborate on developing projects through performance and workshop participation.

Performers new to acting are welcome and encouraged to take part in the course. However, they should be willing and eager to push themselves and be committed throughout the duration.

“The voice is the window to the soul”   – Daniel Day-Lewis

 

Course Content:

The course will cover voice work and comedy acting for film and television.  The workshop topics include:
• Introduction and basic structure of the voice.
• A focus on defining unique speech.
• Mechanics of the voice physiology and breath (breathe in – suspension – exhalation – recovery).
• Increased awareness of the back of the body, scapula and skull base and the relevant relation to posture.
• Introduction to the practice of developing and strengthening the voice from the opening of the main resonances.
• Examining the physicality of phonation.
• An in-depth exploration of crafting jokes as the building blocks of comedy.
• Learning the elements of comedy work and applying those to the text.
• Building comedy on text.
• Dealing with nerves and utilising them during audition technique.
• Creating accents and implementing them naturally.
• Performance coaching where regarding ideas and development.

 

Tutor: Maria Tecce

Maria Tecce is an actor, singer, and voice coach from Boston now based in Dublin. Maria has 15 years experience with the media and offers a special module to executives and public personalities in media interview techniques, microphone techniques, and best practices when appearing on radio, television, and presenting on stage.

The last few years have been Maria’s busiest; she has been performing and writing with Irish music-comedy act The Nualas. She also premiered her new show Strapless at Edinburgh Fringe Festival and Ulster Bank Dublin Theatre Festival, performed with the RTÉ Concert Orchestra, and launched her third album Viva.

Maria recently donned the acting mantel as the saucy courtesan ‘Emelie’ at Dublin’s Gate Theatre in their critically acclaimed production of Les Liaisons Dangereuses, played Irish singing legend Jack L.’s leading lady in the cult short film I Hate Musicals, performed as the iconic ‘Alida Slade’ in Hugh Leonard’s Roman Fever, and as murdered wife ‘Isabella’ in the BBC television series Inspector George Gently with Martin Shaw. She has also worked in film and television with the likes of Jim Sheridan, Angela Landsbury, Patsy Kensit, Mia Farrow and Keith Carradine. “Singer Maria Tecce steals the show.” The Times.

www.mariatecce.com

 

Tutor Michelle Read

Michelle began her performance and writing career as a comic on the London circuit in the late eighties, performing regularly at many of the original clubs including The Comedy Store and the infamous Tunnel Club. On moving to Dublin she became a regular at the Comedy Cellar performing stand-up and sketch comedy and featuring in many Irish TV shows including Cursai Elaine, Couched, The Basement, Rant, Gerry Ryan Tonight, You Can’t Be Serious, Nighthawks and Saturday Live for UTV.

She is a founder member and regular player with the Dublin Comedy Improv since 1991 and has played with the team on two successful radio series for RTÉ, at the Edinburgh Festival, at the Catlaughs Festival, Kilkenny and all over Ireland. Michelle is also a playwright and theatre-maker and she regularly facilitates workshops in improvisation, devising and playwriting.

 

Guest Tutor: Sharon Mannion

Sharon Mannion is an Actor/Comedian and Writer based in Dublin. Her TV credits include Trojan Donkey (Channel 4), Moone Boy (Sky 1), Republic of Telly (RTÉ) and Don’t Tell the Bride – Narrator (RTÉ). She is a member of sketch group Ghost Train Willy and improv groups The Craic Pack, Dublin Comedy Improv and The Cardinals. She drinks a lot of tea and used to work in a chicken factory.

 

Dates:

  • 20th October – 26th November, Tuesdays & Thursdays

 

Class times:

  • 7.00pm – 10.00pm
  • Weekend/evening work may be required for collaborative projects (dates tbc)
  • Participants should set aside two to three hours per week outside of class time for assignments

 

Pricing:

  • €380 Members / €420 Non-Members
  • €150 Deposit

 

Location:

  • Filmbase, Temple Bar, Curved street

 

Follow on courses:

Participants will be offered priority booking for Screen Studio Actors’ Academy Advanced Courses from January 2016 in Comedy Acting, Soap and Television Acting and Acting for Transmedia projects.

 

To book your place, contact Filmbase Reception on 01 679 6716 and dial 0. For more information, email Lynn at lynn@filmbase.ie. Please read our Terms & Conditions before booking a course.

 

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IFI Ireland on Sunday Interview: David Prendeville & Brian Quinn, co-directors of ‘Monged’

Monged-Chosen

Film Ireland spoke to 2 of the 3 co-directors of Monged ahead of the film’s screening at the IFI as part of its monthly showcase for new Irish film. No drugs were taken in the making of this article.

Based on the award-winning play by Gary Duggan, Monged takes place over one drug-fuelled weekend in Dublin and stars Graham Earley, John Connors and Rex Ryan as three mismatched friends. .

Monged was directed by Rory Mullen, David Prendeville and Brian Quinn, and made as part of the Masters in Digital Feature Film Production at Filmbase, which places an emphasis on practical filmmaking to prepare students for a future in film production.

“The course really showed that making a film is entirely doable,” explains Brian. “You get thrown right in the deep end straight away. Our team was responsible for all aspects of the production. Prior to the shoot, we did classes in everything: script writing, pre-production, casting, camera, marketing, funding, music, etc. Then suddenly the powers that be pluck you from the cosy confines of the class room, hurling your feverish limbs into the real world where you have to put what you learned to use. I found the most important thing I learned was how to work with the people around you. Through initial practical class exercises you discover early on who you can trust. Trust is the key component to a healthy relationship and in turn opens up avenues of communication, which, for a director, is everything.”

As one of three directors, Brian animates how they approached the script. “Bash! Mash! Mush! as we squashed our brains together, producing a single cohesive pink wad. Instantly, we tried to intellectually devour the script, harvesting what lay beneath the surface. One of the first things we did as a team was that we wrote down 3 key phrases or words on post-it notes, sticking them in our office wall for all to see. ‘Trapped’, ‘coming of age, ‘duality’ became our story’s spine which would permeate though every directorial decision that was made. This helped to quash out any arbitrary choices so that decisions were solely motivated by story. I find when you make yourself rules or put yourself in a box you become more creative in your approach. Limitation is inspiration. With regard to dividing the script, we thought it best to split scenes among ourselves to direct, thankfully it was an equal spread and straight away we began to prep on our individual scenes.”

In addition to the three lead actors, the film boasts an impressive support cast that includes Aoibhin Garrihy, Clare Dunne, Joe Rooney, Alicia Ayres, Geraldine MacAlinden, Neill Fleming, Gerry Wade, Sharon Skerritt, Shane Robinson and Kyle Hixon. Working with such a cast was something David tells me was one of the highlights of his experience. “We were really fortunate to have such a talented group of actors. The three leads were all phenomenal to work with. They brought a lot of new ideas to the table, that weren’t in the script, and their eagerness to improvise and to create really brought a terrific energy to the film. This really is a film that would live and die by the performances and it was brilliant working with these guys. They are outstanding actors and also their openness, their quick-thinking on set and their creativity made them a pleasure to direct. And it wasn’t just with the leads we were fortunate, all the supporting players did great work on the film and were terrific to work with as well.”

The film is based on the play of the same name by Gary Duggan (RTÉ’s Amber), with a screenplay penned by Barry Dignam. David says, “I don’t think either myself, Brian or Rory were familiar with the play before filming and I think we kind of felt it may be healthier to separate the two mediums and focus on the script we were presented with and let that evolve rather than going back to the play as a point of reference.”

Talking about particular influences the directors brought to bear on the film, David says,we talked a lot about other ‘drugs’ film, such as Trainspotting. The Wolf of Wall Street was a big influence in terms of its gleeful debauchery. We talked also a lot about Boogie Nights in the sense that you go on a journey along with a character into an exciting new world. Also the film has a strong ‘buddy’ element to it and for that we took films such as Withnail and I as a big inspiration.”

Looking back over the whole experience Brian reflects that “the most important thing for a director is preparation, for me it provides personal confidence, ensuring I don’t run around on set like a headless chicken. Though, and here’s the slight contradiction, I find the ability to adapt is on par with prep’s importance. You really have to be prepared to relinquish some of that preparation up to the impromptu mischief of the day of shooting, salvaging the surprises that intensive preparation sometimes sedates.

“When you’re hidden behind closed doors, composing shot-lists, etching ‘n’ sketching storyboards, there’s no way of illustrating reality’s input. I found it hard at times being flexible with my preparation, so it took a while for me to open up my brain’s aperture, letting in the possibilities that may peek.”

 

Monged screens on Sunday, 18th October 2015 at 13.00 as part of the IFI’s Ireland on Sunday monthly showcase for new Irish film.

The cast and crew will attend the screening.

Tickets for Monged are available now from the IFI Box Office on 01 679 3477 or online at www.ifi.ie

 

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Shooting a Horror – Five Fiendish Tips

Stitches

Ahead of Filmbase’s upcoming Screen Studio Academy: Directors Intensive Lab – Shoot Your Own Horror Short, writer, director and nightmare-maker Conor McMahon shares his 5 tips to scare the bejebus out of your audience.

 

1. Take your actors to one location and chop them up. Preferably a location that doesn’t mind you throwing fake blood around.

 
 
2. Make the first death the most impactful. The audience will be nervous about what’s to come.

 
 
3. If you’re making a comedy horror get funny actors. You can’t direct someone how to tell a joke.

 
 
4. Use the elements. Wind, fire, smoke and rain, will all add to the atmosphere.

 
 
5. In a scary horror less is more. In a comedy horror, more is more.

 

 

Filmbase Present

Screen Studio Academy: Directors Intensive Lab

20th October – 26th November, Tuesdays & Thursdays

€380 Members / €420 Non-Members

SHOOT YOUR OWN HORROR SHORT! Learn the techniques needed to successfully direct a horror film with the Screen Studio Academy: Directors Intensive lab. Participants will focus on idea generation to intensify terror as well as creating atmospheric screen stories.

 

Intro:

The Screen Studio Academy: Directors’ Intensive Lab is a highly practical course for filmmakers who want to take their skill to the next level. While examining different genres of horror, students will develop a group idea to shoot a short horror film.

The course runs two evenings per week (Tuesdays and Thursdays) and directors will also be expected to set aside time outside of class for assignments and for developing project work. As well as working on the short, participants will also work with the Screen Studio Actors and Writers Academy programmes at Filmbase to collaborate on developing projects through performance and workshop participation.

Participants new to directing are welcome and encouraged to take part in the course. However, they should be willing and eager to push themselves and committed throughout the duration.

Course Content:

The course will cover directing for horror film and television, specifically focusing on:

• Creating a story that speaks to an audience
• Looking at fear triggers and how it’s translated in film
• Story and script editing
• Developing a directorial voice
• Working with producers and creative departments
• Understanding cinematography and lighting techniques
• Horror genre conventions
• Planning for special effects and gore
• Working with actors
• Post production

 

Tutor: Conor McMahon

Conor studied filmmaking at the Irish National Film School in Dun Laoghaire. In 2004 he made his debut feature film Dead Meat, which was funded by the Irish Film Board. Following this, Conor went on to direct Zombie Bashers, an entry in the RTÉ’s Storyland competition. The show was voted by the public as the winner of the competition.

Short Films Conor directed have won numerous awards including: Best Short at the Sitges Film Festival (Spain), First Prize in the Kodak Commercial Awards (London) and Second prize at Edinburgh’s Dead by Dawn Horror film Festival.

Conor has worked on the popular RTÉ sketch show, The Republic of Telly, writing and directing sketches with acts such as The Rubber Bandits, Damo & Ivor and Georgia Salpa. His 2012 feature film Stitches, starring British comedian Ross Noble, won best film at the Midnight Xtreme section of the prestigious Sitges Film Festival. And most recently: Conor’s latest feature, From the Dark has been described by Fangoria as ‘a taut, coiled piece of dread-infused cinema that… delivers everything one could hope for from a fresh entry in that subgenre.’

 

Dates:

  • 20th October – 26th November, Tuesdays & Thursdays

 

Class times:

  • 7.00pm – 10.00pm
  • Weekend/evening work may be required for collaborative projects (dates tbc)
  • Participants should set aside two to three hours per week outside of class time for assignments

 

Pricing:

  • €380 Members / €420 Non-Members
  • €150 Deposit

 

Location:

  • Filmbase, Temple Bar, Curved street

 

Follow on courses

Participants will be offered priority booking for Screen Studio Directors’s Academy Advanced Courses from January 2016 in Comedy Directing, Soap and Television Directing and Directing for Transmedia projects.

 

To book your place, contact Filmbase Reception on 01 679 6716 and dial 0. For more information, email Lynn at lynn@filmbase.ie. Please read our Terms & Conditions before booking a course.

 

Visit www.creativeeuropeireland.eu

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5 Tips to Improve Your Voice Work

Maria Tecce, actress who is appearing with The Nualas. Photo: Tony Gavin 20/2/11

Photo: Tony Gavin

Ahead of Filmbase’s upcoming Screen Studio Academy: Actors Intensive Lab (20th October – 26th November), actor, singer and voice coach Maria Tecce shares 5 tips every actor should follow to improve their voice work.

 

Your whole body is your voice.

So many of us focus on the throat when we think about the voice. But your whole body is involved in producing sound and has potential for resonance and vibration. Like any athlete, the muscles we use to make sound need to be worked and strengthened. When we’re rehearsing, we’re using our voices regularly so it’s building up strength, but ideally, doing some kind of warm up before you do any kind of voice work is a good idea.

 

Never push your voice.

Not only are you likely to do damage but it’s exhausting. And it’s also exhausting for the audience to listen to. We work in many different types of spaces, some with better acoustics than others, so when you get into a new space, have a test run with some text to see how it feels and where you have to place your voice to fill the space. Instead of ‘projecting’ or pushing your voice, think of sending your thought out with more intention and clarity.  If your voice is released and in good nick and your breath is coming from a grounded, centred place, you won’t need to push.

 

Tension vs. Relaxation

The voice involves more muscles than just the vocal folds in the throat. All muscles have the potential to carry tension, especially around the throat, shoulders, and jaw areas, so be aware of where you’re carrying tension and give it some love. Tension is your voice’s worst enemy; relaxation is its best friend. When we are more relaxed, we can focus with more clarity, be more present in the moment and able to respond.

 

Breath is key.

Breath is the key for a strong, supported voice. It’s the imprint for vibration and sound. Getting that breath coming from a deep, grounded place gives you more power and choice when you’re performing. Whether you’re working on stage or in front of a camera, breathing helps centre you in body, voice, and thought.  It’s also a great tool to deal with nerves. God forbid you dry on stage or forget your lines, but if you do, breathe. Your body will remember when your mind doesn’t. Breath is the support for everything in your vocal arsenal.

 

Warm up.

Everybody has their own routine, ritual, or regime for warming up; there are as many warm ups as there are performers. Some people do very little; some people need an hour. But whatever you do, do something. Warming up isn’t just about preparing your body and voice to be ready to respond, it’s also waking up your thought. Clear thought = clear text.  The voice is one of the most flexible, powerful, elegant tools for communication we have. It can start a war. It can say ‘I love you’. It’s a powerhouse for emotion, passion, authenticity, texture, and colour.  And it’s all at your fingertips. Use it well

 

www.mariatecce.com

 

Screen Studio Academy: Actors Intensive Lab

20th October – 26th November, Tuesdays & Thursdays
€380 Members / €420 Non-Members

The Screen Studio Academy Actors’ Intensive Lab is a highly practical course for performers. Participants will learn techniques to successfully engage with audiences as well as explore personal comic presence.

 

Intro:

Are you looking to develop your acting skills? Voice and comedy performance are vital to becoming a versatile and successful actor and knowing how to utilise performance to create dynamic characters is a staple in any actor’s toolbox.  This programme is designed to challenge students who are committed to polishing their abilities to a professional level.

“Acting is not about being someone different. It’s finding the similarity in what is apparently different then finding myself in there.”  – Meryl Streep

This six-week programme will focus on vocal work, sketches and dynamic exercises. Clear precise speech and articulation skills will be developed to improve material delivery.

During the course, students will be immersed in the world of professional performance. Not only does the training run for two evenings per week (Tuesdays and Thursdays), but actors will be expected to set aside time for assignments and developing project work. Participants will also work alongside the Screen Studio Directors and Writers Academy courses at Filmbase to collaborate on developing projects through performance and workshop participation.

Performers new to acting are welcome and encouraged to take part in the course. However, they should be willing and eager to push themselves and be committed throughout the duration.

“The voice is the window to the soul”   – Daniel Day-Lewis

 

Course Content:

The course will cover voice work and comedy acting for film and television.  The workshop topics include:
• Introduction and basic structure of the voice.
• A focus on defining unique speech.
• Mechanics of the voice physiology and breath (breathe in – suspension – exhalation – recovery).
• Increased awareness of the back of the body, scapula and skull base and the relevant relation to posture.
• Introduction to the practice of developing and strengthening the voice from the opening of the main resonances.
• Examining the physicality of phonation.
• An in-depth exploration of crafting jokes as the building blocks of comedy.
• Learning the elements of comedy work and applying those to the text.
• Building comedy on text.
• Dealing with nerves and utilising them during audition technique.
• Creating accents and implementing them naturally.
• Performance coaching where regarding ideas and development.

 

Tutor: Maria Tecce

Maria Tecce is an actor, singer, and voice coach from Boston now based in Dublin. Maria has 15 years experience with the media and offers a special module to executives and public personalities in media interview techniques, microphone techniques, and best practices when appearing on radio, television, and presenting on stage.

The last few years have been Maria’s busiest; she has been performing and writing with Irish music-comedy act The Nualas. She also premiered her new show Strapless at Edinburgh Fringe Festival and Ulster Bank Dublin Theatre Festival, performed with the RTÉ Concert Orchestra, and launched her third album Viva.

Maria recently donned the acting mantel as the saucy courtesan ‘Emelie’ at Dublin’s Gate Theatre in their critically acclaimed production of Les Liaisons Dangereuses, played Irish singing legend Jack L.’s leading lady in the cult short film I Hate Musicals, performed as the iconic ‘Alida Slade’ in Hugh Leonard’s Roman Fever, and as murdered wife ‘Isabella’ in the BBC television series Inspector George Gently with Martin Shaw. She has also worked in film and television with the likes of Jim Sheridan, Angela Landsbury, Patsy Kensit, Mia Farrow and Keith Carradine. “Singer Maria Tecce steals the show.” The Times.

www.mariatecce.com

 

Tutor Michelle Read

Michelle began her performance and writing career as a comic on the London circuit in the late eighties, performing regularly at many of the original clubs including The Comedy Store and the infamous Tunnel Club. On moving to Dublin she became a regular at the Comedy Cellar performing stand-up and sketch comedy and featuring in many Irish TV shows including Cursai Elaine, Couched, The Basement, Rant, Gerry Ryan Tonight, You Can’t Be Serious, Nighthawks and Saturday Live for UTV.

She is a founder member and regular player with the Dublin Comedy Improv since 1991 and has played with the team on two successful radio series for RTÉ, at the Edinburgh Festival, at the Catlaughs Festival, Kilkenny and all over Ireland. Michelle is also a playwright and theatre-maker and she regularly facilitates workshops in improvisation, devising and playwriting.

 

Guest Tutor: Sharon Mannion

Sharon Mannion is an Actor/Comedian and Writer based in Dublin. Her TV credits include Trojan Donkey (Channel 4), Moone Boy (Sky 1), Republic of Telly (RTÉ) and Don’t Tell the Bride – Narrator (RTÉ). She is a member of sketch group Ghost Train Willy and improv groups The Craic Pack, Dublin Comedy Improv and The Cardinals. She drinks a lot of tea and used to work in a chicken factory.

 

Dates:

  • 20th October – 26th November, Tuesdays & Thursdays

 

Class times:

  • 7.00pm – 10.00pm
  • Weekend/evening work may be required for collaborative projects (dates tbc)
  • Participants should set aside two to three hours per week outside of class time for assignments

 

Pricing:

  • €380 Members / €420 Non-Members
  • €150 Deposit

 

Location:

  • Filmbase, Temple Bar, Curved street

 

Follow on courses:

Participants will be offered priority booking for Screen Studio Actors’ Academy Advanced Courses from January 2016 in Comedy Acting, Soap and Television Acting and Acting for Transmedia projects.

 

To book your place, contact Filmbase Reception on 01 679 6716 and dial 0. For more information, email Lynn at lynn@filmbase.ie. Please read our Terms & Conditions before booking a course.

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Get into Film: Autumn Training at Filmbase

Actor Intensive2

Filmbase, a training centre in the heart of Temple Bar, has just launched its schedule of autumn courses. Covering both creative and technical elements of filmmaking, these training opportunities vary in length from a weekend’s masterclass to a year-long MA programme.

The Screen Studio Academy: Intensive Lab is a brand new series of courses aimed at writers, actors and directors who have existing experience and are now looking to develop their skills in an intensive workshop environment. Tutors include Conor McMahon, Mary Kate O’Flannagan, Rachel O’Flannagan, Maria Tecce, Michelle Read and Sharon Mannion.

November hosts two weekend workshops. First up, Stephen Follows presents the Film Producer’s Masterclass, taking you through every step of the filmmaking journey, from idea through to seeing your creation on the big screen. Then Josh Appignanesi (The Infidel; Song of Songs) will help emerging filmmakers by addressing in practical detail the fundamental questions with his course on Visual Storytelling.

For those dipping their toes in the water, courses include Screenwriting and Directing for Beginners, as well as Documentary Filmmaking, 5-day DSLR, Writing TV Drama and FCPX training.

September also sees the MA in Digital Filmmaking kick off, where students shoot a feature film.

 

To get the low-down on all of these courses and more, visit http://filmbase.ie/autumn-training-at-filmbase/

 

Filmbase has been supporting Irish filmmakers since 1986 through a range of services including quality training at affordable rates, access to film funding award schemes and equipment hire. Go to www.filmbase.ie for more info.

 

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Deadline for Reel Art 2015 Announced

RA-2

The Arts Council has announced the deadline for the 2015 Reel Art scheme.  Launched in 2008, Reel Art is designed to provide film artists with a unique opportunity to make highly creative, imaginative and experimental documentaries on an artistic theme.  Operated in association with Filmbase and the Dublin International Film Festival, Reel Art will wholly support two films with grants of €70-€80,000 per project.  Reel Art films will premiere at the Dublin International Film Festival in February 2017. The deadline for receipt of applications is Friday, 16th October 2015 at 5pm.

The Arts Council’s purpose in offering the Reel Art scheme is to support film artists to make documentary art films that would not otherwise get made. A key aim of the scheme is to complement, rather than replicate, the documentary and other funding programmes offered by the Arts Council, broadcasters and funding agencies in Ireland. 

Reel Art projects should be conceived for theatrical exhibition at film festivals and in arthouse cinema settings.  Only proposals for original, imaginative and aesthetically-driven treatments of arts subjects will be considered. Proposals that offer visually engaging, creative and experimental approaches to their subject will be prioritised.

Film artists interested in applying for Reel Art are invited to attend an information session on the scheme on Tuesday 22nd September at 3pm at Dublin Theatre Smock Alley and will outline the purpose and priorities of the award and will answer questions on the scheme. Anyone interested in attending is required to register their interest by sending an email to reelart@filmbase.ie

Updated guidelines for Reel Art 2015, together with application forms for the scheme are available for download from the website www.filmbase.ie/reelart as are details of previous Reel Art projects.

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Green Filmmaking: Part II

blaadjes

Jonathan Victory continues his series of articles on green filmmaking by looking at the role of an eco-manager.

Last week the concept of green filmmaking was explored as a way to reap the financial, organisational and social benefits of reducing the environmental impact of the film and television industry. Industries around the world should identify substantive ways to contribute to this emerging field if they do not wish to be left behind by other resourceful film industries. A novel approach would be the appointment of an eco-manager to set: a crew member with the specific role of maximising sustainability.

Efforts to maximise the environmental sustainability of film sets will be difficult to implement and hard to measure without assigning a specific person or team of people to organise them. Conceivably, the unit production manager could be assigned the additional duty of overseeing sustainability policies on the film set but there could be concerns that this would add to an already considerable workload. Production accountants could also be tasked with some kind of auditing of a set’s waste production, energy consumption and carbon footprint but implementing the environmental measures necessary to mitigate these is most likely outside the skill-set of accountants. Thus a relatively new phenomenon has emerged on certain film sets whereby a single crew member oversees environmental initiatives on-set.

This role has been referred to variably as “eco-manager”, “eco-supervisor” and “green production manager”. A specified term has not yet emerged nor has a recognisable framework for how this crew member does their job. But a clearer definition of this role may emerge in years to come if film productions seek to maximise their environmental sustainability.

This person would be responsible for researching and implementing sustainability solutions and facilitating ease of compliance on-set. They could oversee the responsible disposal of waste during and after the shoot. They could even promote this work being done on-set through social media, press engagement and where possible, the application of celebrity endorsement, in the hopes that it would raise awareness for the feasibility of green filmmaking.

The advantage of assigning these duties to a specific role is that responsibility can be delegated to a crew member of expertise who can monitor the progress of green initiatives in order to audit savings in energy, waste and finances and to identify the practices that would be most effective when applied elsewhere in the industry. If net savings can be secured for the production then this should justify the salary of some kind of eco-specialist who understands the particular challenges faced by film and television production.

This role has already emerged in a variety of production contexts. It has been performed on big-budget Hollywood productions such as Noah and The Amazing Spider-Man 2 by Emellie O’Brien, whose New York-based social enterprise Earth Angel NYC offers sustainability consulting and on-set eco-supervisors for film and television productions.

Emellie graduated from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts with a B.F.A. in Film and Television and a minor in Producing. Her passion for film production and her passion for the environment were combined as she pioneered the role of organising responsible waste disposal on film shoots around New York. This caught the attention of the Oscar-nominated director Darren Aronofsky who was shooting the Biblical epic Noah near New York with a particular focus on the environmental themes of the Noah’s Ark story. Insisting on an environmentally-friendly shoot, he contracted Earth Angel to work on this large-scale Hollywood production. The Earth Angel website claims they ended up avoiding the use of 67,485 plastic water bottles, recovered 10,038 meals of leftover food for local homeless shelters and reduced waste overall by 55%.

She then worked on The Amazing Spider-Man 2, which ended up being virtually carbon-neutral in spite of it being the largest-budget production ever filmed in New York. With such resources behind a superhero franchise blockbuster one would think the environmental impact couldn’t be mitigated yet Earth Angel claims to have reduced the production’s waste by 52%. They also set up the Twitter account @ecospidey to promote the work they were doing through social media.

Those still of the mindset that environmentalist policies are costly could make the understandable assumption that while blockbusters backed by major studios have the money to invest in them, lower-budget projects have no time or money to be spared trying to organise something new like this. Yet in Ireland we do in fact have a case study on applying the principles of green filmmaking to the production of micro-budget features under great pressure.

Students based in Dublin on the Filmbase Masters in Digital Feature Film Production Programme produced two feature films in 2014, Poison Pen and The Light of Day. Sustainability on these films was overseen by a student and former Green Party politician John Gormley, who acted as a green production manager. Over his political career, Gormley had built up many connections in fields of green innovation having been Lord Mayor of Dublin, leader of the Green Party and Minister for the Environment, Heritage and Local Government. He used these connections to provide Filmbase students with resources such as an electric car, reusable drinking flasks, vegetarian catering and locations powered by renewable energy through Airtricity.

Savings were made which helped the production of two features, each of which only had a five-figure budget largely acquired through crowdfunding. Challenges remained regarding the differences in circumstance between the two productions. For example, Poison Pen accessed many on-grid locations which could be powered by renewable energy, whereas much of The Light of Day was shot on one off-grid location that made the use of a diesel generator unavoidable. This is due to the lack of provision of sustainable alternatives to diesel generators as was discussed in last week’s article.

Nevertheless, crew members were open to pioneering green filmmaking in Ireland and in any event completed their films on schedule for premieres at the 2014 Galway Film Fleadh. The Filmbase students were eventually recognised by winning 1st prize in Strawberry Earth’s international Green Filmmaking Competition.

Productions of all sizes could make significant reductions in cost and environmental impact if this role becomes more commonly practiced and accepted within the industry. The experience of eco-managers thus far suggests that someone performing this new role must have a consistent, agreeable presence on-set, demonstrate the benefits of their measures and communicate clearly throughout pre-production, the shoot itself and production wrap, particularly when it comes to organising the responsible disposal of waste. On the other hand, there is a responsibility on the part of industry to help facilitate this role. For a start, assigning them the status of a head of department would afford them the respect needed to implement their policies.

In general, there is much more that is needed to support the transition to green filmmaking. While introducing eco-managers to film shoots is one worthy avenue to pursue, there are a range of policies and investments that could be made. We will explore the emerging international best practice next week.

 

 

You can read the first part of the series here

 

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Video: How to Get a Job in Film

IMG_8917Pic: Molly Pixler

How to Get a Job in Film was a free information session held in Filmbase on Thursday, 9th April. The event brought together a panel of film experts, including Irish producer of U.S-originated feature films and television drama, Morgan Bushe – O’Sullivan’s recent credits include ‘Vikings’, ‘Camelot’, and ‘The Tudors’. He will be joined by cinematographer David Grennan, who’s worked on ‘Eamon’, ‘Kisses’ and ‘What Richard Did’; BAFTA and ACE winning editor, Tony Craunston  – his credits include ‘Perrier’s Bounty’, ‘Amber’, ‘Love Rosie’ and ‘The Death of a Superhero’; Noel Quinn – an Emmy-nominated Sound Recordist, has worked on feature films, including Michael Collins’, ‘Reign of Fire’, and ‘The Butcher Boy, documentaries, and commercials in a number of countries worldwide, and has lectured extensively on the topic; ; Stunt Coordinator, Patrick Condren –  a member of Stunt Register Ireland, known for his work on ‘King Arthur’, ‘In America’, ‘Calvary’, ‘Foyle’s War’ and ‘Moone Boy’; Graphic designer Paul Brady – credits include ‘Ripper Street’, ‘Penny Dreadful’, ‘Calvary’ and ‘Brooklyn’; costume designer Maeve Paterson – worked across projects such as ‘The General’, ‘The Tiger’s Tail’, ‘Jack Taylor: Shot Down’, and ‘A Film with Me in It’; and Padraig O’Neill – a production designer and art director, known for ‘Garage’, ‘Adam & Paul’ and ‘Savage’.

 

Here’s a taster of the night’s proceedings:

 

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Shortspace: Free Family Screenings at Filmbase

10177themissingscarf

 

 

This Christmas season Filmbase are decking the halls with festive cheer and putting on a free feast of short films. Join us on Thursday 11th for the screening of Irish short films specially selected to be enjoyable for adults and kids alike. The event features some of the best animation and family friendly short films to come out of Ireland, and gives parents a chance to rest shopping-weary legs!

When: Thursday 11th December

Time: 5.00PM

Where: Filmbase, Curved St, Temple Bar

Duration: 40mins

Suitable for: Age 5+
This is a free event but is ticketed. To register your place head over to event’s Eventbrite Page which you can find on http://filmbase.ie/free-christmas-shortspace-screening/

 

The Line-Up:

The Missing Scarf

DIR: Eoin Duffy | WRI: Eoin Duffy, Richard Duffy | PRO: Jamie Hogan | MUS: Gavin Little, Tobias Norberg | ANI: Eoin Duffy | CAST: George Takei

7mins

Synopsis: Albert the Squirrel makes a startling discovery … an empty space where once his favourite scarf lay. He heads off into the forest only to find everyone else is preoccupied with worries of their own. Ultimately, Albert’s problem is put in perspective by the friends he helped and the problems they faced and overcame together.

 

Snowflake

WRI/DIR/ANI: Eoin Duffy

1min

A short Christmas tale.

 

 

Tilly and the Teeth

WRI/DIR: Brian Durnin | PRO: Michael Duffy | DOP: Ivan McCullough | CAST: Jenny Ni Chleirigh, Orla O’Rourke

11mins

Synopsis: Tilly and the teeth is a gothic fairy tale in the style of Tim Burton of a young girl who, along with her dog Chopper, plots revenge against her parents and the tooth fairy, all of whom conspire to steal from her.

 

Billy & Chuck

WRI/DIR: Lee Cronin | PRO: John Keville | DOP: Tom Comerford | CAST: Robert Donnelly, Alison Doody, Mark Tankersley

15mins

Synopsis: Billy, a boy with a wild imagination, sets out on an adventure deep into the forest guided only by a distant voice on the other end of his walkie talkie.

 

The Boy in the Bubble

DIR: Kealan O’Rourke | WRI: Kealan O’Rourke, Niall Murphy, Ray Kane | PRO: Brian Willis | CAST: Alan Rickman

7mins

Synopsis: Rupert, a ten year old boy, falls hopelessly in love for the first time. When it all goes terribly wrong, he wishes never to experience heartache again. Turning to a book of magic, he invokes a spell to shield him from emotion forever.

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