Doc Fest Ireland 2019 to Kick Off this June

Doc Fest Ireland 2019

Doc Fest Ireland – a new industry focussed, all-Ireland documentary film festival.

Belfast Film Festival has recently announced a brand new annual festival, ‘Doc Fest Ireland’ which will take place in Belfast from Wednesday 12th June – Sunday 16th June this year. Doc Fest Ireland will showcase only documentary films, presenting new Irish and international feature length and short documentaries. 

The festival will provide a platform to showcase the Irish documentary filmmaking industry, promoting a dynamic programme of events that are both entertaining and provocative.

The last five years have seen a surge in feature-length documentaries from the island of Ireland, with many securing theatrical releases. 

Hard-hitting post-conflict legacy films such as Sinead O’Shea’s A Mother Brings Her Son To Be Shot, and Belfast-based Sean Murray’s Unquiet Graves are making waves in the industry. Belfast based Fine Point Films filmography includes Emmy-nominated Elián, Alex Gibney’s No Stone Unturned and Bobby Sands: 66 Days, which is currently streaming on Netflix. 

The success of Belfast Film Festival’s sold-out pilot Irish Documentary Festival in 2018 highlights the strong interest in documentary film and the need for film festivals on the island of Ireland that focus on this type of film.

Doc Fest Ireland will also host a series of industry events and master classes, pitching sessions and information sessions for new and emerging filmmakers including the BFI/Doc Society New and Emerging Talent Day.

The festival is now seeking submissions for Doc Market (deadline Friday 19th April), an opportunity for filmmakers to meet with industry professionals including international funders, broadcasters, distributors and exhibitors from across the UK, ROI, US and EU.

Decision Makers in attendance at Doc Market to date, will include:

Arte France | Arte Germany | Broadcasting Authority of Ireland | BBC Arts | BBC Northern Ireland | BBC Storyville | Creative Europe | European Documentary Network | EO / IKON Docs Netherlands | The Kennedy / Marshall Company | Northern Ireland Screen | USA PBS | RTÉ | Screen Ireland | SWR Germany | TG4 Ireland | TRT Turkey | the WRAP Fund Ireland | TV Poland

Doc Market will be a hub for funding, sales and distribution of Irish and international documentaries and a place where local talent can continue to thrive. Find out more about Doc Market here

Chair of Doc Fest Ireland, internationally renowned documentary filmmaker Mark Cousins, said: 

“Belfast is one of the most interesting cities in the world. It’s in transition and, because of Brexit and Belfast’s rapid social change. It is a fascinating place to take the temperature of the UK and Ireland. Add in the fact that the team behind Doc Fest Ireland is passionate and experienced, and that Ireland has a great tradition of documentary film, and it’s hard to think of a better place to launch a dynamic new documentary festival”. 

Doc Fest Ireland’s principal funders are Northern Ireland Screen, TG4 and Arts & Business with additional funding from Queen’s University. 

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Review: Vox Lux

Tom Crowley takes a look at Brady Corbet’s musical drama, which screened at the Dublin International Film Festival.

Actor-turned-director Brady Corbet is interested in what makes a person a leader. What makes one individual special to other people? His debut film, The Childhood of a Leader (2016), adapted from a short story by Jean-Paul Sartre, attempts to depict the early formative years of a future fascist dictator. In his new film, Brady explores the idea of someone born to be famous; this fact is clearly derived from the film’s philosophical voice-over, provided by Willem Dafoe, who delivers his dialogue as if narrating a fairy-tale.

Celeste (played by Raffey Cassidy in her teenage years and Natalie Portman as an adult), is a victim of a horrific and violent attack during her school years. Occurring early in the film, it is a genuinely heart-pounding cinematic moment. In a room full of people, she is the only one to try and take control of the situation. Many years later, she will make the Lennon faux-pas and compare herself to Christ.

Portman gives her best performance since her Black Swan Oscar win in 2010. Is there anybody better at playing a tortured performer? She gives Celeste an assuredness and a vicious streak in her public life, and a manipulative uncertainty in her private life, surely symptoms of megalomania which comes from being a worshiped celebrity most of your life.

Divided (as Leader was) into four stages, indicated by minimalist black titles cards with white text, which seemed perfect in the context of his first film and is brilliantly at odds with this one, Prologue, Genesis, Re-genesis and Finale, adds to the religious undertones (also present in Leader), which Celeste’s name suggests. Corbet has carefully structured a sometimes shocking, sometimes funny and always stimulating film about the modern world, a ‘21st Century Portrait’ the final tie-dyed title card proclaims. The film blends celebrity and terrorism on a wider scale while also creating an ambitious psychological character study which culminates in a Bohemian Rhapsody (2018) still comeback concert. The two films could not be more different. While Rhapsody insists on trying to shoe-horn in every heavily sanitised detail on Mercury and Queen’s careers, Vox Lux wants us to fill in the gaps for ourselves as we take a decade long leap from the inception of Celeste’s career to her ‘comeback’ concert in her home town. Corbet is earnest about his character study but mocks the ‘pop’ genre his character is associated with, in the same way Bradley Cooper does in A Star is Born (2018).

Corbet’s talents are not only in content but also in style. The piercing, unsettling soundscapes of The Childhood of a Leader return, with Corbet again teaming with composer Scott Walker. The soundtrack forces the viewer to feel that something of a significant magnitude is happening (even if it might not be). Corbet presents us with two sequences in fast-forward, a liberating if hedonistic trip to Stockholm by two sisters and a troubled stars hotel room drug binge with her manager. Both sequences are carefully staged by Corbet and shot by Lol Crawley, to speed them up is an indicator of vision. The hotel room sequence is reminiscent of Alex’s bedroom romp in Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange (1971). At 30 years of age Corbet is already a unique cinematic voice and a director for the future.

Vox Lux screened on 28th February 2019 as part of the Dublin International Film Festival (20th February – 3rd March)

In cinemas 3rd May 2019

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Paper Panther Productions Wins at Irish Animation Awards

The Bird and The Whale

The 2019 Irish Animation Awards ceremony was held in Dingle last night  and the big winner was Paper Panther Productions, who scooped up three awards, including Best Animation and Best Design & Art Direction for the stunning The Bird and The Whale. They also won the Best Newcomer Award, a new category introduced this year.

Among the other major winners on the night were Cartoon Saloon for The Breadwinner (Best Feature) and Brown Bag Films for Vampirina, which won Best Animated Preschool Series (up to 6 years) and Best Writer for an Animated Series.

Boulder Media and Windmill Lane’s Danger Mouse was another outstanding success, bringing home three awards for Best Director, Best Music and Best Sound Design. Nora Twomey, the Oscar nominated director of Cartoon Saloon’s The Breadwinner also came home with the prestigious Murakami Award.

The awards this year was the biggest yet for animation Ireland, with four new awards categories and a huge increase in the number of entrants. There are 16 categories in total, up from 12 in 2017 and one of our new awards is the Kids’ Choice Award, with the winner being chosen by primary school children across the country. Another new category is Best Newcomer, which according to , Animation Ireland Chairperson Moe Honan ‘’shows the continuing increase in the amount of new studios being set up. The new award categories and the sheer volume of entries reflect the substantial growth in the sector over the past two years.’’

Winners of each category received a statuette designed by animator, film maker and teacher Eimhin McNamara. The statuette resembles a Phenakistoscope which was an early animation device used to create an illusion of motion.

 

Full List of Winners:

Best Animated Preschool Series (up to 6 years)

Vampirina: Going Batty – Brown Bag Films

Best Animated Short Film

The Wiremen: Jessica Patterson/ JAM Media

Best International Short Film

All the Things- Chris Guyot & Paul McMahon (USA/IRL)

Best Writer for Preschool Animation (up to 6 years)

Becca’s Bunch: Acorn King- Shane Langan & Amy Stephenson

Best Writer for an Animated Series

Vampirina: Home Scream Home -Chris Nee/ Brown Bag Films

Best VFX as part of Animated TV Series or Film

Space Chickens in Space – Paul Rutledge/ Gingerbread Animation

Best Animation for Apps, Gaming and Interactive

Aurora- Pink Kong Studios

Best Design and Art Direction

The Bird and the Whale- Carol Freeman/ Paper Panther Productions

Best Director of an Animated TV Series

Danger Mouse- Aidan McAteer/ Boulder Media

Best Animation

The Bird and the Whale- Eimhin McNamara & Carol Freeman/ Paper Panther

Best Music

Danger Mouse: Melted- Sanj Sen and Dominic Lawrence /Boulder Media

Best Sound Design

Danger Mouse- Dominic Lawrence and Sol O’Carroll/ Windmill Lane

Best Irish Feature Film or Special

The Breadwinner- Nora Twomey/ Cartoon Saloon

Best Newcomer

Paper Panther Productions

Kid’s Choice Award For Best  Pre-School Animated Series (up to 6 years)

The Doc Mc Stuffins Christmas Special-Brown Bag Films

 Kid’s Choice Award For Best  Animated Series (6-12 years)

Space Chickens in Space- Gingerbread Animation

Murakami Award

Nora Twomey

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Review of Irish Film @ DIFF 2019: Dirty God

June Butler was at the Dublin International Film Festival for a screening of Sacha Polak’s Irish co-production Dirty God.

 

In her first feature length role, newcomer Vicky Knight elicits a mesmerising performance as Jade in Dirty God, a moving film about inner beauty and societal burdens placed on those who are deemed to fall outside accepted images of physical attractiveness. The initial introduction to Jade is pitiless and unflinching. Jade has been the victim of an acid attack with her controlling ex-boyfriend Eli (Karl Jackson), and father of her daughter, to blame for the assault. Opening scenes are tense with close-up images showing the cauterized landscape of Jade’s face and neck contorted in whorls of brutalised body tissue. A heart-beat tempo accompanies Jade through underground raves with strobe lighting casting shadows on her facial scars as she makes her way through crowds of gyrating dancers. A previous romantic interest is dating Jade’s friend but the attraction between Jade and Naz (Bluey Robinson) is undeniable. Naz is able to see beyond the adage and realises that beauty may be considered skin deep but what lies further beneath is beyond compare.  

Various scenes show Eli prowling through nightclubs within sight of Jade – almost appearing to know her every move. When the case goes to court, Jade appears alone and vulnerable locked into a staring match with the ubiquitous steely-eyed Eli. Jade briefly finds freedom when she dons a burqa and dances her way along the balconies of the housing complex she lives in. Invisibility is the currency Jade craves in her search for acceptance.

Jade attempts to kindle online relationships but soon learns that she is vilified for her disfigurement and slowly starts to withdraw. Her shoplifting mother, Lisa (Katherine Kelly), is unable to fully grasp the mental anguish Jade is experiencing as she is rejected at every turn. Ultimately, Jade’s journey begins when she embraces the love of her young daughter and realises that she alone holds the key to becoming a survivor and living life on her own terms.

Sacha Polack, as director and producer of this truly beautiful film has wrought a stunning piece of cinematic mastery. By exploring the tragedy of those who have suffered a similar fate and who find themselves locked in a world where every witness recoils in horror or stares transfixed, Polack has raised the spectre of an apocalyptic post-acid life. What happens after the burns heal as best they can? How do relentless visual presentations of human perfection hold up against a body that seems to be broken beyond repair? The deliberate dehumanisation of another living being is troubling and disconcerting as Jade encounters casual brutality carelessly doled out by co-workers. Moreover, Polack touches upon a system of barbaric annihilation – one that is endured whilst passively existing as an object of love. When rejection occurs, a visceral all-consuming rage follows suit provoking ultimate obliteration.  

Postscript by the reviewer:

I went to see this film in Dublin’s Lighthouse Cinema and encountered Sacha Polack and Vicky Knight at the viewing. Knight briefly related how she, at the age of eight, was the victim of an arson attack and was badly burned as a result. Knight outlined her initial reluctance in becoming involved with the project but was persuaded by the extremely convincing Sacha Polack. For both Polack and Knight, this was a perfect encounter and the relationship has engendered a film that exudes authenticity. This reviewer is very much looking forward to the prospect of future offerings from both.   

 

Dirty God screened on 3rd March 2019 as part of the Dublin International Film Festival (20th February – 3rd March).

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Review: Us

DIR/WRI: Jordan Peele PRO: Jason Blum, Ian Cooper, Sean McKittrick, Jordan Peele • DOP: Mike Gioulakis  ED: Nicholas Monsour• DES: Ruth De Jong  MUS: Michael Abels • CAST: Lupita Nyong’o, Winston Duke, Elisabeth Moss

I’m still a bit miffed that Jordan Peele didn’t run with my super-cool idea for his film. Picture this: the movie opens with the title card for Us, except it’s obscured by some sort of spooky fog. Then, as the fog clears, the title card comes into sharper focus and – what’s that? Two dots have appeared! It’s not Us as we imagined, but instead U.S.! The United States! On the big screen! Who’d have imagined?! Aaaand, fade to black, the end. But Peele had his own ideas, just not quite as nuanced as my own, and I can respect that. And since Us turned out to be well paced, tense, and genuinely scary, I have to hand it to him: he did not need my help this time.

In Peele’s new horror, Adelaide Wilson (Lupita Nyong’o) is haunted by a trauma that has remained with her for over thirty years: as a young girl, she was briefly separated from her parents while at a beach-front carnival and only vaguely remembers what she endured while exploring an abandoned hall of mirrors. Returning to the same beach three decades later with her family in toe, Adelaide fears that whatever she has been trying to avoid all that time is about to catch up with her. It appears that her fears are not unfounded when four enigmatic figures, all dressed in red, appear outside their holiday home one night. When they break in and come face-to-face with the Wilson family, the Wilson family discover their doubles staring back.

While Us might not be quite as good as Peele’s breakout debut Get Out, it’s certainly the most immediately scary of the two (whereas the Sunken Place in Get Out had me feeling sick to my stomach, the cat-and-mouse games throughout Us had me watching through my fingers), and surely that is one reasonable metric by which to measure your horror. Starting off evocative of other terrifying home invasion narratives such as The Strangers and The Invitation, Peele’s second film, like Get Out, reveals its machinations originate in a landscape located somewhere between the realms of science fiction and fantasy. Not unlike the work of Ursula K. Le Guin, this enables Peele to explore the implications of the surface of society in comparison to what remains unseen.

Lupita Nyong’o is fantastic as both versions of Adelaide: both the socially awkward loner and over-protective mother protagonist, and the terrifying crack-voiced double who appears to be spearheading the doppelgänger attack. Winston Duke plays Adelaide’s husband, Gabe, a likeable if somewhat bumbling boat enthusiast. What with his square glasses, beard and comic relief, he comes across as something of a Peele-a-like. If I were to fault the casting in any way it would be a criminal under-use of the incredibly funny Tim Heidecker as the father of a fellow vacationing family and frenemy of Gabe (that’s right, I’m taking no prisoners here).

While Us couldn’t really be said to be a sequel to Get Out it does still tackle many of the same ideas, particularly in relation to the commodification of the (both African and non-African) American body. I am already anticipating plenty of discussion regarding the significance of the doppelgängers’ red costumes, for starters. Beyond the immediate nail-biting horror there is plenty to mull over, and indeed it feels like a movie that will reward repeat viewings. All I can say for now is that, after one viewing, Us feels like a puzzle that disconcertingly doesn’t seem to quite fit together: maybe you’re not looking at it the right way up, maybe there’s a piece missing, or maybe you’ve just realised your double is hiding under the table and is really putting you off. Whatever the reason, Us remains disturbingly oblique and is probably all the better for it.

Sarah Cullen

116 minutes
16 (see IFCO for details)
Us is released 22nd March 2019

 

 

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How to Create a Great Pitch Pilot

OPEN INDUSTRY SESSION 

Five projects have been selected for EDN Galway Workshop but you have an opportunity to attend the Open Session on 2nd April on How to Create a Great Pitch Pilot.

Using concrete examples of successful Pitch Pilots this plenary session will be presented by experienced Pilot Editor Jesper Osmund and EDN Film & Media Consultant Ove Rishøj Jensen.  This half-day presentation is available free of charge to all Documentary Filmmakers or anyone with an interest in the Creative Documentary.

REGISTER HERE FOR THIS FREE INDUSTRY SESSION

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Watch Irish Short Film: Pernicio

In Pernicio, a young man explores his attitude towards life and death when his suicide plans are interrupted. David Fox tells us how he made the film.

Pernicio is my grad film from my final year in the National Film School in IADT, Dun Laoghaire.

The idea for the white ‘execution room’ sprung to my mind some time in 2014. I think there had been a lot of debate surrounding assisted suicide at the time, and my mind began to wonder what it would look like if it was a walk-in clinic and you could kill yourself as easily as buying a Big Mac. The idea began to snowball and dragged capitalistic ideas with it with the multinational corporation that would make money off people’s desires to kill themselves, and lo and behold I had the basic idea for a film.

I sat on the idea for about two years before I put pen to paper, a process which I think worked in my favour on this project. It evolved and developed in my mind for those two years, and when it came to pitching for my final year project in college, this was the idea that was itching to get out.

I finally got on to developing the script in early September 2016. I knew the theme of suicide had been overused and almost trivialised in student films, so I wanted to stray away from those clichés as much as possible. I think I went through 11 drafts of the script in the end.

Dave Fox, Director

The way it works in the NFS is that you get allocated a week to shoot your Grad film at the start of the year, anytime between late January and late April. We were allocated February 6th – 12th. We had one week to shoot it and maybe a couple of days here or there to get pick-ups if we needed.

We held open auditions just before Christmas 2016 and my leads walked through the door and sat down in front of me, something which I genuinely did not expect to happen, but each one of them struck perfectly in-line with the characters. I met with Eoin O’Sullivan (Gary), Danielle Galligan (Sam), Mark Lawrence (Doctor) and Aidan J Collins (Receptionist) about half a dozen times before the shoot. We rehearsed scenes, explored different routes and found our favourite direction before began shooting. That was something that proved to be invaluable to me; I did most of my directing off-set. Two weeks before the shoot I locked the script – finally.

Cast & Crew

We shot 5 days over a week-long period. The big white ‘execution room’ took a full day to build and light properly and we had about 8 hours to shoot everything and tear it down again the following day, which was terrifying and exciting.

Alfie Hollingsworth was my cinematographer and we clicked really well on this shoot. I asked him about the room, how we would light it properly, how to not make it look like a student-film-looking set and how we’d avoid shadows in the jib shots. He came up with the idea of lighting the room through a 16X16 silk which we hung over the set, a brilliant idea. This, coupled with the brilliant production design of Fiona Mitchell gave us the ethereal white light in those scenes that I wanted.

We actually pimped out a super old sound editing hardware that we found in the film school and put some tubes and lights on it for the machine in the middle of the room. If you look closely at the close ups of the machine you can see ‘treble’ and ‘bass’, something which became a lot more apparent when we were screening in cinemas, but I’m hoping no one notices on their first watch.

Our other locations included my bedroom, The Dublin Dental School (the reception scenes), Dollymount Strand, the Dart, and the Lexicon in Dun Laoghaire, all secured by my producer Laura Gaynor. The Lexicon was a brand new building at the time and I thought it had a real retro-futuristic look to it. We VFX’d the Pernicio ‘P’ on the side of the building, with the help of Robert Gaynor. The shoot went very smoothly overall, except for leaving our Data Wrangler behind in the Golf Club on Bull Island, who we only remembered when we had gotten into town – sorry Robyn.

Dani during final scene

Conor Donoghue edited the piece, and did an excellent job doing so. I sat back from the project for about a week and let him do an assembly cut of his own accord. We knew soon after that we had a film. We got really lucky with the sound mix, as our mixer Janneke van Nijnanten was doing work experience down in Ardmore studios on the sound stage. She showed Steve Fanagan what she was working on and he said he would be help us out with a 5.1 sound mix, and generously he gave his time for free. Not many student films can claim to have a professional surround-sound mix so that really adds a whole other dimension to the film when it’s screened in the cinema. Darius McGann put together a brilliantly emotional and poignant original soundtrack too.

Everything came together well in the end. We were well organised, believed in ourselves but also, we got really lucky with a lot of things and a lot of people helped us out on this film, to whom I am extremely grateful.

Student films are hard, everyone is learning, people can be unsure of themselves, and other people can let you down. I’m happy to say no one let us down with this film, everyone outdid themselves. We set ourselves a goal to make a student film that didn’t feel like a student film, and I think, and hope, we achieved that.

 

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Call For: Submissions for Waterford Film Festival

The Waterford Film Festival is now accepting submissions for the 13th addition of the festival, which takes place Friday, November 22nd – Sunday, November 24th.

The WFF is the first film festival in the Republic of Ireland to hold a short screenplay competition.

The script competition is to encourage and support writers and every year it selects up to 25 finalists and one of the prizes for the overall winner is access to filmmaking equipment and editing facilities with WFF’s partners at FilmLab Waterford.

Details here

 

 

Film Festivals 2019 – Here & Abroad

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East Asia Film Festival Ireland

For its third edition this April, the East Asia Film Festival Ireland (EAFFI) celebrates the diversity, artistry, and variety of filmmaking from East and South East Asia over four days from April 11-14th. The festival features established and award-winning filmmakers such as Hong Sang-Soo, Ying Liang, Zhang Ming and Ryusuke Hamaguchi. The festival also celebrates exciting new talent including Bi Gan, plus first features from Lina Wang and Phuttiphong Aroonpheng.

This year sees two guests of honour attend the festival: acclaimed director Tsai Ming-Liang and his long-time collaborator, actor Lee Kang-Sheng. They will present rare screenings of two of Tsai’s classic films, The River and I Don’t Want To Sleep Alone, plus his latest, Your Face. Tsai and Lee will also take part in a Masterclass, supported by Screen Skills Ireland and moderated by renowned critic Tony Rayns, on Saturday 13th.

A number of Irish premieres will also feature, including the festival’s opening film, Hong Sang-Soo’s latest comedy-drama Hotel by the River. With this new film, Hong has crafted an elegant tragi-comedy, a chamber piece that unfolds in less than 24 hours where an ageing poet is approaching his final days. Beautifully filmed in black and white, this is a fresh, humanistic exploration on family, life, love and death.

Commenting on this year’s slate, the festival’s Artistic and Programming Director Marie-Pierre Richard said, ‘’We are honoured to welcome auteur filmmaker Tsai Ming-Liang and actor Lee Kang-Sheng to present rare screening of three films programmed for our festival by Tsai and his producer. Distinguished film critic and one of the world’s leading experts on Asian cinema Tony Rayns will be here to conduct a masterclass and Q&As with Tsai and Lee, and also to present our opening and closing films. The new films playing at this year’s festival bring together the voices of significant filmmakers from a multitude of geographical contexts in East and South East Asia, with each skillfully addressing questions of identity and the burning issues of our time including ethnicity, nationhood and family.’

Also featuring at this year’s festival are Lina Wang’s stunning A First Farewell, a prize winner at both the Berlin and Tokyo film festivals; A Family Tour, directed by Ying Liang, is a moving drama that puts political pressure exerted on filmmakers under the spotlight; Bi Gan’s sumptuous Long Day’s Journey Into Night, which features a long, virtuoso single take, shot in 3D; Ryusuke Hamaguchi’s modern romance Asako I & II; Zhang Ming’s The Pluto Moment; and Liu Jie’s fast-paced social justice drama Baby, which sees a young woman abduct an infant who has the same birth defect she herself had as a child.

Closing the festival this year will be Phuttiphong Aroonpheng’s debut Manta Ray, which focuses on the relationship between a fisherman and the Rohingyan refugee he finds unconscious in the local swamps. This poignant film tackles the refugee experience and associated questions of identity, self, border, ethnicity and nationhood.

Tickets for the East Asian Film Festival Ireland are available now at www.ifi.ie/eaffi-2019 or by calling the IFI Box Office on 01-6793477. More information is also available from www.eaffi.ie.

 

 

Film Festivals 2019 – Here & Abroad

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Irish Animation Awards

The 2019 Irish animation Awards, taking place on Saturday 23rd March, are set to once again highlight the brilliance and talent of the Irish animation sector. This year’s ceremony, which is hosted by animation trade association Animation Ireland, has seen a huge upsurge in the number of entries and four new award categories.

Among the nominations this year are the two Oscar nominated films from Cartoon Saloon, The Breadwinner and Late Afternoon, as well as nominations for stunning virtual reality animations such as Pink Kong Studios’ Aurora. Paper Panther’s The Bird and the Whale and Brown Bag Films’ Doc McStuffins Christmas Special picked up four nominations. However, Gingerbread Animation’s Space Chickens in Space is way out in front with seven nominations in total.

According to Animation Ireland’s Industry Chair Moe Honan, the awards this year highlight the continued growth and creativity in the sector; ‘’looking at the nominations you can really see the truly impressive amount of breath-taking work being produced in Ireland at the moment. Ireland’s position as one of the world’s best locations for animation is now firmly cemented.’’

Moe went on to say; ‘’this year we have four new awards and our very hard working judges have been extremely busy with the number of entries. There are 16 categories in total and one of our new awards is the Kids’ Choice Award, with the winner being chosen by primary school children across the country. Another new category is Best Newcomer, which shows the continuing increase in the amount of new studios being set up. The new award categories and the sheer volume of entries reflect the substantial growth in the sector over the past two years.’’

The biennial awards ceremony is sponsored by RTÉ, Screen Ireland, Animation Skillnet, Philip Lee, CelAction, Screen Skills Ireland, Brophy Gillespie and Gorilla Post.

Winners of each category will receive a statuette designed by animator, film maker and teacher Eimhin McNamara. The statuette resembles a Phenakistoscope which was an early animation device used to create an illusion of motion.

Animation Ireland is the trade association for Ireland’s animation studios, representing 25 member studios who employ more than 1,500 people nationwide. The sector has seen meteoric growth in recent years, with the sector now generating over €100 million for the economy annually as Irish animation projects are viewed in over 120 countries worldwide.

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The Movie Brothers – Part I: John Houlihan


John and Patrick Houlihan at Newsman Scoring Stage at 20th Century Fox Studios (pic: John Houlihan)

 

The Movie Brothers – Part I: John Houlihan

By

James Bartlett

 

In honour of St. Patrick’s Day, we interviewed two brothers – John and Patrick Houlihan – who not only both live in Southern California and both have the same job as a music supervisor, but they also both work at 20th Century Fox film studios.

As the oldest of the two, we chose John to go first. Like Patrick, he is Senior Vice President of Music at Fox, and his credits include John Wick 1 and 2, the Deadpool and Austin Powers movies, Atomic Blonde, The Shape of Water and many more movies and television shows. He’s also the co-founder and past president of the Guild of Music Supervisors.   

He was born in upstate New York, “just a couple miles away from where my Great-Great Grandfather lived when he arrived from Ireland in 1867.” In the 1970s the family relocated to New Jersey, which was where he mainly grew up and graduated High School. “It was a rowdy upbringing, being one of five siblings with awesome parents,” he remembers.  

He now lives in Studio City, California, with his wife of 20 years Julie, and three teenage sons. “Daily life is like a sitcom without cameras,” he says, then admits that his official press-release age will stay “mid to late 40s” for as long as he can manage it.

John noted that the Houlihans “are a part of the great Irish diaspora: out of sight but not out of mind,” and that everything has changed in recent years.

“I’ve become obsessed with trying to confirm the Irish towns, churches and neighborhoods where my ancestors once dwelled – it seems around Tipperary. Fortunately for me and my brothers I’ve hit a research wall, so it seems like we need to travel over for a pub crawl across Ireland in order to find the original parish records that hold our family origin story. We’ll bring my 13-year-old son to be our designated driver!” he laughs.    

Both brothers have visited Ireland before, and John’s first trip was part of his honeymoon. “We both fell in love with the people and the land,” he says.

A few years later in 2004, John returned to Ireland – this time thanks to his career. He was working with legendary Irish writer-director Jim Sheridan on the biopic Get Rich or Die Tryin’, which was partially edited in Dublin after shooting in Toronto.  

But what does a music supervisor do? In brief, they get a script and asses the music needs for the story; what the composer might produce, what songs should be used in the background, or in montages, or even sung by characters.    

“There is no such thing as a typical day,” said John, “and that’s why it is a dream job for us.”

Explaining further, he said that they “do the craziest things behind the scenes to help the vision of filmmakers and musicians come true. We jump into the fray and help a dozen different creative people agree on the best music approach for a film when everyone has their own highly subjective take.”

A large amount of time is spent on the business side of things too. Permission and (sometimes large) payments are necessary to use any song that’s still in copyright, but countless other factors can come into play and change everything. As a rule, the more famous the song, the more expensive it will be to use.  

“We can’t just think of music ideas; we need to deliver those ideas by creating new recordings that make movie magic, oversee the formal copyright clearance deals and manage limited budgets.”

John remembered helping a director get $2,000,0000 worth of licensed music choices into their final film on a music budget of $500,000, and said that there have been some strange moments too.

“I was tip-toeing down a recording studio hallway past two snoozing, 300 lb., 6 foot 6-inch-tall, bodyguards so I could crash a recording session and close a song deal with a famous rapper,” he remembers, adding that he even once meditated himself into a deep trance to send a beam of energy across America to Aretha Franklin so she would approve use of one her songs.

“And it worked too!” he laughs.

John – or his brother – can be working on up to a dozen movies simultaneously, “and sometimes we’re juggling 101 problems. We try to flow with it all, and be like improvisational jazz musicians. Coming from a big family was good practice,” he says.  

Though the world of the movies might be a secret to many of us, there is one thing professionals and public alike can relate to: how music has changed from being a physical form (vinyl, cassettes, CDs) to online streaming and computer files.

“I’ve received well over 100,000 CDs over the years from companies and artists pitching their music for use in film and TV,” says John, admitting that he occasionally had joyful clear-outs, junking countless silver discs.

Nevertheless, he’s been unable to go entirely cold-turkey. He tries to be as online and digital as possible in his day-to-day listening, but he and Julie (who, unbelievably, is a music supervisor too) still have some 40,000 CDs in their garage.

He half-jokingly says he expects to end up on a “Hoarders” reality television show one day, “clutching a David Bowie CD set as their psychologist tries to talk me into finally throwing everything away.”

More seriously, he notes that while a large majority of the history of popular music is available online, around 15% or so has not yet – and may never – make the migration to digital, so having as much available as possible gives him every opportunity to find that “homerun” song.

Talking further about work, it was impossible not to ask John about the pros and cons of working with his brother Patrick every day.

John wonders if their boss was “out of her mind to hire two Houlihans,” but then admits that it’s “definitely is fun to see my brother every day, and get the chance to collaborate with him on major film projects.”

Then came the inevitable sibling joshing.

“Patrick himself will tell you that I’m absolutely the smarter, funnier and clearly more handsome of the two of us – not to mention my athletic superiority!” boasts John.

John worked in the industry from his early days – booking bands for school festivals and working as a college radio DJ – and then, after graduating college, he started an artist management company and independent record label in New Jersey.

The two brothers have also worked together for many years; John was manager of Patrick’s indie rock band Daisyhaze in Washington, DC, though in 1992 John was the first to move to Los Angeles with the express purpose to get into music supervision.

He had just $200 in his pocket then, but in time he hired Patrick at a small company he co-founded, and the story continued with Julie and yet another of their brothers, Kevin, joining them (his expertise being in music licensing).  

As John says, “there must be a music secret sauce recipe in the Houlihan’s!”   

It could have been very different, though. John says that when he was in college, he started a house-painting company during summer vacation, and found he had a real knack for it.

“I am at inner peace when I’m painting a house, especially the windows and trim,” he said, adding that his work once moved a watching woman to tears. “I’ll admit she possibly had a drinking problem, but it was still a nice compliment!”

It seems that ultimately then he took the right path, but as for the future, he has an Irish dream that’s not related to music:

“To buy a home on the water in Kinsale. So, if in 20 years you see an old guy in a beat-up fishing boat puttering around the River Bandon before heading to the pub, that will be me.”

Next we talk to Patrick and learn his story…

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‘Misty Button’ Wins in California

Misty Button,  an Irish/American Indie feature film wins “Best Narrative Feature” at San Luis Obispo International Film Festival  in California.

The film was written and directed by prolific Kerryman Seanie Sugrue and co-produced with another rising Tralee filmmaker Bertie Brosnan. Corkmen portray the two leads Cillian O’Sullivan and Shaun Kennedy. The film also stares renowned New York City theatre actor John Keating from Tipperary. Also starring in the movie is rising Broadway star, Julia Nightingale who can now be seen in The Ferryman directed by Sam Mendes among other TV veteran actors in the United States.

Starring

Cillian O’Sullivan – Vikings, Maze

Shaun Kennedy – Monsters Inside Me, American Ripper

John Keating – Ray Donovan, Boardwalk Empire, The Lone Ranger

Kevin Breznahan – Superbad, There Will Be Blood, Alive, Winter’s Bone

Victoria Meade – Vinyl HBO

Donald Paul – Atlanta, SEAL Team, Blue Bloods

Bret Lada – Orange is the New Black, Law and Order: Special Victims Unit

Gerard McNamee – The Following, The Get Down, White Collar

Josh Salt – Chicago PD, Cut Shoot Kill, Blue Bloods

Gerardo Rodriguez – The Blacklist, Person of Interest

 

 

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In Conversation with Emer Reynolds

Emer Reynolds

Emer Reynolds

 

On Friday, 22 March 2019, 6 – 7:30pm TCD will host anin conversation’ event with Emer Reynolds, writer and director of The Farthest (2017) chaired by Prof Ruth Barton(TCD) co-organised by Trinity School of Creative Arts and CONNECT.

Award-winning editor, writer and documentary director, Emer Reynolds, will discuss her acclaimed film,The Farthest  with Associate Professor in Film Studies, Ruth Barton, and CONNECT Principal Investigator, Marco Ruffini, in the Long Room Hub on Friday March 22, at 6pm.

The Farthest tells the inspiring story of Nasa’sVoyager space probes in the words of the men and women who designed and built the spacecraft. Interspersed with extraordinary imagery from the journey through space,The Farthest played at festivals worldwide, culminating in winning an Emmy in the category of ‘Outstanding Science and Technology Documentary’ in 2018. A celebration of the possibilities of scientific vision and of the humanity of those behind these experiments, including the creators of the ‘golden record’ made to enlighten possible alien encounters about life on earth,The Farthest is a testament to the potential of the human imagination.

Register here 
The interview will include sequences from The Farthest alongside a discussion of the film.

Accessibility: Yes
Campus LocationTrinity Long Room Hub
Room: Neill Lecture Theatre
Audience: Undergrad, Postgrad, Alumni, Faculty & Staff, Public
Cost: Free (but registration is essential)
More infowww.eventbrite.ie…

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‘The End Of The Earth Is My Home’ Screens in UK

Alan Lambert’s 2012 Sci-Fi film The End Of The Earth Is My Home will be having its  UK premiere on March 16th in Hastings.

It’s part of the Irish Film Week programme that runs March 13-17 in the Kino-Teatr in St. Leonards on Sea, near Hastings Beach. It’s also the World Premiere of this new cut, which is condensed and runs at 30 mins.

The screening is on Saturday March 16th at 2:00pm – in the ‘Irish Short Films’ programme.

Kino-Teatr website; https://www.kino-teatr.co.uk

For more info on the film see: http://www.metaldragon.net/films_teoteimh.html

Film Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNFxFGKdT-0

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Doc Fest Ireland

Introducing Doc Fest Ireland, an industry focussed, all Ireland International Documentary Festival.

 

Belfast Film Festival presents Doc Fest Ireland, a new, industry-focussed All-Ireland Documentary FIlm Festival, which will take place in Belfast from  Wednesday 12th June – Sunday 16th June this year.

Doc Fest Ireland will showcase only non-fiction film, presenting new Irish and international feature length and short documentaries. The last five years have seen a surge in feature-length documentaries from the island of Ireland, with many securing theatrical releases, and Doc Fest Ireland will provide a platform to showcase the great talent within the Irish documentary filmmaking industry, promoting a dynamic programme of events that are both entertaining and provocative.

 

DOC FEST IRELAND MARKETPLACE

 

Doc Market is an opportunity for filmmakers to meet with top decision makers including international funders, broadcasters, distributors and exhibitors on a one to one basis. The Doc Market will be a hub for funding, sales and distribution of documentaries in Ireland and globally, and an incubator for nurturing domestic talent so that our industry can continue to thrive in the future.

Doc Market is the only marketplace dedicated to documentary on the island of Ireland and will provide an opportunity for filmmakers to pitch their project through carefully matchmade meetings organised by the Doc Fest Ireland team.

 

Decision Makers in attendance at the Marketplace will include:

 

Arte France | Arte Germany | BBC Northern Ireland | BBC Storyville | Creative Europe | European Documentary Network | EO Docs Netherlands | Northern Ireland Screen | RTÉ | SWR Germany | TG4 Ireland | TRT Turkey | the WRAP Fund Ireland | TVP Poland

 

Further international funders, distributors and broadcasters will be announced in the coming weeks.

 

You can submit to the Doc Fest Market here. The deadline for application is Saturday March 30th. Your idea must be long form (50 minutes +) and you must have at least one TV / digital / theatrical credit in documentary, although this can include shorter form.

 

In addition to the marketplace, the festival will host a training session for EU Co-Production, in collaboration with the European Documentary Network and Creative Europe on Wednesday June 12th. Further details on this event will be announced on the Doc Fest Ireland website in the coming weeks.

We will also host the NI Screen 1st Feature Pitch which is a pitch for development money of £7.5k to do a teaser for a feature doc. It’s open to anyone who has not made a feature, including new and emerging talent. Film makers without production companies will be placed with an experienced company.

 

Doc Fest Ireland will also present a diverse range of panel sessions and talks, a BFI/Doc Society day, as well as live pitches and social events.

 

DOC FEST IRELAND ACCREDITATION NOW AVAILABLE

 

Accreditation for Doc Fest Ireland is now available to purchase online. Whether you are an industry professional, student or documentary enthusiast, festival passes are available to suit your needs and budget. Accreditation types available are the:

 

Pure Talent Pass

Pure Docs Pass

Pure Class Pass

 

 

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Irish Film / TV Series on Netflix

Looking for something Irish to watch on Netflix – here you go:

Brain on Fire

Brain on Fire is a 2016 biographical drama film directed and written by Irish filmmaker Gerard Barrett. Stricken by seizures, psychosis and memory loss, a young New York Post reporter visits doctor after doctor in search of an elusive diagnosis

Can’t Cope Wont Cope

In Dublin, friends Aisling and Danielle must come to terms with adulthood with their millennial hijinks and hangovers begin to wear off.

Stars Seána Kerslake and Nika McGuigan.

Cardboard Gangsters

A low level drug dealer decides to move up the ranks of the illegal narcotics trade in Darndale, Dublin, putting him and his gang on a violent path.

Cured

The Zombie apocalypse is thwarted by a cure for the virus. But now the antidote is found, who will fix a broken society?   Stars Ellen Page, Sam Keeley and Tom Vaughan Lawlor.

Damo & Ivor

A pair of loud-mouthed Dublin twins, reunited after being separated at birth, embarks on a wild road trip to search for their third missing sibling.

Dominion Creek

Three Irish brothers arrive in the Yukon during the Gold Rush hoping to strike it rich, but a powerful man and greed soon divide them.

Handsome Devil

A self-described outsider is sent to a rugby-obsessed boarding school, where he forms an unexpected bond with the star player

Hostage to the Devil

Follow the eerie story of Father Malachi Martin, a disenchanted priest whose belief in demonic possession would lead him to conduct several exorcisms

I.T.

An embittered IT consultant launches a stealthy attack against a wealthy businessman by turning his state-of-the-art smart home against him. Stars Pierce Brosnan.

Jack Taylor

Ken Bruen’s bestselling crime novels leap to life in this series of TV movies featuring Irish cop-turned-private-investigator Jack Taylor.

Katie         

The critically acclaimed and award-winning Katie Taylor documentary KATIE directed by Ross Whitaker is now on Netflix. KATIE which has been wowing audiences since it picked up the Best Irish Feature Documentary award at the Galway Film Fleadh last summer intimately follows champion boxer Katie Taylor as she attempts to rebuild her career after a year of turmoil threatened to derail her career. With many writing her off, Taylor decided to start again, and the notoriously private champion agreed to let a small crew document her attempt to rescale the heights.

MAZE

When IRA member Larry Marley is sent to Northern Ireland’s Maze prison, her put his methodical and manipulative plan for a mass escape into action.

Michael Inside

The 34th

‘The 34th’ tells the story of the driven and dedicated people who formed Marriage Equality in Ireland and developed it into a highly effective grassroots force with one clear goal in mind – the extension of Civil Marriage to same sex couples. Through revealing interviews and archive material, former board members and staff outline the strategising, fierce battles, sheer hard graft and personal cost of running such an all-consuming campaign.  From the KAL (Katherine Zappone & Ann Louise Gilligan) case to a YES vote on 22nd May 2015, this documentary spans a decade culminating in the 34th amendment to the Irish constitution, allowing same sex marriage.

The Foreigner

After his daughter is killed by terrorists, a sullen restaurateur seeks the identities of those responsible and travels to Ireland to take vengeance

The Hardy Bucks

A circle of young men entertain vague ambitions involving quick cash, woman and showbiz in this mockumentary on small town Irish life in County Mayo.

The Hardy Bucks Movie

Party loving Irelanders plan a road trip to Poland to take in some soccer and sights.  But their journey veers way off course when they hit Amsterdam.

The Irish Mob

This documentary crime series charts the rise of the Irish Mob in America, from urban immigrant poverty to political power and wealth.

The Secret Scripture

The chief psychiatrist of a soon-to-be-razed mental institution tries to discover the mystery behind the confinement …

 

The Siege of Jadotville

The Siege of Jadotville tells the true story of Irish Soldiers who were besieged by overwhelming enemy forces while on a UN peacekeeping mission in the Congo.  The heroes led by Commandant Pat Quinlan fought for five days and heroically defended their outpost.   A Netflix Original film, based on the book Siege at Jadotville : The Irish Army’s Forgotten Battle by Declan Power.  Stars Jamie Dornan, Jason O’Meara, Mark Strong and Sam Keeley.  https://youtu.be/9_JHsiQTTmg

 

The Young Offenders

Never ones to think things through, two Irish teens steal bicycles and set off to the coast to find a bale of cocaine from a smugglers capsized ship.

 

Trailer Park Boys live in F**kin Dublin

Not exactly Irish but the Trailer Park boys come to Ireland after winning a contest to see Rush but are arrested by immigration and must perform a community service puppet show.

Trespass Against Us

A man from a criminal family yearns to break away and find a better life, but his father’s staunch opposition puts his dreams of freedom in jeopardy.

Wake Wood

After losing their only child in a dog attack, two parents discover a pagan ritual that will grant them three more days with their deceased daughter.

 

www.netflix.com

 

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‘Red Room’ on Release

Director Stephen Gaffney’s horror debut “Red Room” is set for home release on March 19th by Breaking Glass Pictures US. The film will be available on DVD, iTunes, Play Store, Amazon and Vimeo.

Produced by Marc Hughes (Sicario Pictures), this indie feature is the third to be released by Deep Web Films, an Irish production company co-founded by Stephen Gaffney and Erica Keegan. “Red Room” also stands as the final chapter of Gaffney’s “Deep Web Trilogy” – a combination of thriller, crime, drama, and horror which delves into the darkest corners of the Dark Net.
Distributor Breaking Glass Pictures describes the film as ‘An extreme horror film that brings the terror of what lies in the deepest, darkest corners of the internet into the light…with blood-soaked results. Kyra, a young woman kidnapped off the street after a night out, wakes up in an isolated house with two other captives. They are informed by their sadistic captors that they must wait their turn to enter the Red Room before they will be released. Once they discover they will never leave alive, they plot to escape before it’s too late… ‘
Written by Stephen Gaffney and Erica Keegan, the feature stars Amy Kelly (Red Rock), John D’alessandro (Class-A, Cardboard Gangsters), Eddie Jackson (Game of Thrones), Eoin Quinn (Fair City, limp) Brian Fortune (Game of Thrones), Alan Sherlock (Lift) , and Fionna Twamley-Hewitt (Red Rock, Charlie), alongside Saoirse Doyle (Class-A, Crone Wood), Rodrigo Ternevoy (Fair City), Aisling O’Neill (Fair City), and more.

The DVD can pre ordered on DVD here

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Irish Film Festa Full Programme Announced

 

Full line-up revealed for the 12th Irish Film Festa, the only Italian film festival completely dedicated to Irish cinema and culture, which is taking place from 27-31 March 2019, at the Casa del Cinema in Rome.


Northern Irish actor John Lynch will attend the festival as a guest of honour. Lynch has a special bond with Italy, since his mother is from Trivento, Molise; at IFF he will take part in a public interview and look back over his career, from Pat O’Connor’s Cal (1984) and Michael Rymer’s Angel Baby (1995, to be screened at the festival) to Mary McGuckian’s Best (2000), and more. John Lynch will also hold an acting workshop, open to students and professionals.

This year’s opening film is The Drummer and the Keeper, directed by Nick Kelly and winner of Best First Feature at the 2017 Galway Film Fleadh: Gabriel (Dermot Murphy), recently diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and Christopher (Jacob McCarthy), who is suffering from Asperger’s Syndrome, are two teenage boys who meet each other as players in a special football team and develop a strong friendship.


As previously announced, IFF will host the Italian premiere of Lance Daly‘s Black ’47, the historical drama set during the Great Famine which was a big hit at the Irish box office last year. The cast features Hugo Weaving, James Frecheville, Jim Broadbent, Stephen Rea, Freddie Fox, Barry Keoghan, Moe Dunford and Sarah Greene. The screenplay of Black ’47 – written by Daly with PJ Dillon, Pierce Ryan and Eugene O’Brien – is partly inspired by the Irish-language short film An Ranger, directed by Dillon and also screened at the IFF in 2010.

Metal Heart marks the debut as a director of Irish actor Hugh O’Conor: young twin sisters Emma (Jordanne Jones) and Chantal (Leah McNamara) are worlds apart, and when their parents go away for the summer, their simmering rivalry threatens to boil over. A photography exhibition will also be held at the Casa del Cinema during the festival, featuring 18 portraits of Irish directors and actors (Andrew Scott, Moe Dunford, Barry Keoghan, Nora Twomey, among the others) taken by O’Conor himself.


Hugh O’Conor is also linked to this year’s Irish Classic, Colin Gregg’s Lamb (1985), where ten-year-old Hugh was cast opposite Liam Neeson.

 

The Dig, a Northern Irish tense thriller directed by Andy and Ryan Tohill, won the 2018 Galway Film Fleadh as Best Irish Feature: after serving fifteen years for murder, Callahan returns home to find Sean, his victim’s grieving father, searching for the body in an endless bog. Ryan Tohill and the two lead actors, Moe Dunford and Lorcan Cranitch, are expected to attend the Italian premiere of the film.

Michael Inside is the new film by Frank Berry, following I Used to Live Here, which also screened at IFF in 2016. The titular character Michael (Dafhyd Flynn) is an impressionable 18-year-old sentenced to three months in prison after he is caught holding a bag of drugs for a friend’s older brother. The cast also includes Lalor Roddy, Moe Dunford and Robbie Walsh.


The 12th IFF gives more space to documentaries, organising a panel discussion on the topic, as well as a series of dedicated screenings.

The Lonely Battle of Thomas Reid, by Feargal Ward, brings on screen the story of unyielding Irish farmer Thomas Reid who refuses to sell his 300-year-old farm to the multinational microchip manufacturer Intel. The film premiered in the main competition at IDFA Amsterdam in 2017 before screening at Hot Docs and Sheffield DocFest.

Directed by Seán Murray and narrated by Stephen Rea, Unquiet Graves details how members of the RUC and UDR, (a British Army regiment) were centrally involved in the murder of over 120 innocent civilians during the recent conflict in Ireland. Belfast-born Murray, whose previous work Ballymurphy screened at IFF in 2015, will take part in this year’s documentary panel.


Also expected to attend, Northern Irish director and producer Brendan J Byrne: IFF will screen his short documentary Hear My Voice, a touching tribute to those who suffered a loss during the Troubles. The film combines Colin Davidson’s portrait collection “Silent Testimony” with the spoken words of the people, victims and survivors of the conflict, featured in the paintings.


The Mam Trasna Murders (Murdair Mhám Trasna), a docu-drama written and directed by Colm Bairéad, tells the story of barbaric murders committed in the midst of a rural

community in Joyce Country, in 1882. The truth about those crimes was only recently unveiled and established. Lead actor Dara Devaney will attend the screening.


This year, the short film competition also focuses on documentaries, with a dedicated section, and includes Bog Graffiti, the latest experimental work by veteran author Bob Quinn.

 

The special screening of three episodes from hit comedy series Derry Girls (Channel 4), created by Lisa McGee, will close the festival: set in Derry in the early 90s, this sit-com is a warm, laugh-out-loud funny and honest look at the lives of ordinary people living under the spectre of the Troubles, all seen through the eyes of 16-year-old Erin and her friends.

 

As part of the IFFbooks section, dedicated to literature and authors from Ireland, the festival will host a conversation with Irish-born writer Karl Geary. He’s also an actor (Jimmy’s Hall by Ken Loach) and a screenwriter (Coney Island Baby, 2003), and published his first novel, Montpelier Parade, in 2017.

www.irishfilmfesta.org | #IRISHFILMFESTA


Facebook: /irishfilmfesta
Twitter: @IrishFilmFesta
Instagram: @irishfilmfesta
YouTube: IrishFilmFesta Roma

 

 

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Review: Under the Silver Lake

DIR/WRI: David Robert Mitchell PRO: Chris Bender, Michael De Luca, Adele Romanski, Jake Weiner • DOP: Mike Gioulakis  ED: Julio Perez IV • DES: Michael Perry  MUS: Disasterpeace • CAST: Andrew Garfield, Riley Keough, Topher Grace

 

Is it impressive that Under the Silver Lake manages to be a lot stranger than the trailer implies (and the trailer is quite odd in and of itself). I don’t know if  that’s impressive, but I feel it’s worth mentioning. Sometimes trailers these days don’t give away the whole movie, which is something to admire. If this seems like faint praise, it sort of is. Because while an attempt to make something Pynchon-esque yet more accessible for the screen is in and of itself far from unwelcome, director David Robert Mitchell’s over-indulgent run-time and some undercooked storylines mean it is ultimately less than the sum of its parts.  

Andrew Garfield’s Sam is an aimless young slacker living in L.A. whose money is just about to run out. He spends much of his time in Rear Window fashion, spying on his female neighbours in his condo and engaging in conspiracy theories. After encountering a mysterious new women, Sarah (Riley Keogh), at the swimming pool, Sam falls for her and spends the evening with her, only to discover the next morning that she and her roommates have all left in the night. Wondering whether her disappearance has anything to do with the recent sudden death of a local billionaire or a prophetic zine, Sam starts following clues which lead him into the underworld (occasionally literally) of Hollywood.

While not without some enjoyable sleuthing for both the protagonist and audience, Sam’s character is perhaps a microcosm of the film’s problems as a whole. We never really get a strong sense of what exactly Sam believes beyond the fact that he, um, thinks that pop culture has secret messages embedded in it that are meant for rich people. Yeah. This admittedly could be a good starting point for a character (or indeed a movie), but requires a lot more fleshing out to become something interesting. As it is, the central mystery of the film feels similarly like a bare-bones outline of a finished work, with a whole load of unnecessary red herrings thrown in (to take my example above, I feel I was being rather charitable in comparing the film to Rear Window. Quite frankly, Sam’s just a Peeping Tom). Where Mitchell’s film is more successful in evoking its competing themes of anxiety and nostalgia for twentieth-century popular culture is in its visuals and soundtrack: aesthetically impressive and gorgeously edited, Under the Silver Lake certainly feels appropriately neo-noirish as Sam wanders around in a fugue of Los Angeles-tinged uncertainty.

It’s also disappointing to see how Under the Silver Lake under-uses its cast beyond Garfield. Garfield himself is hugely likeable (arguably more than the character should be) and capable as a protagonist who could easily have been unforgettable as an author or audience surrogate and as such is hugely pivotal in maintaining engagement in the film. However, beyond Garfield the impressive supporting cast are almost all reduced to glorified cameos, with Topher Grace, Jimmi Simpson and Laura-Leigh Clare appearing in only in a small number of scenes. Particularly glaring is Zosia Mamet’s Troy, seemingly Sam’s friend with benefits who, despite featuring heavily in the first half of the film, is not seen again.

While Under the Silver Lake may be well-intentioned in its attempt to explore the dark underbelly of the American movie business, it’s hard not to feel disappointed that it attributes so little agency to the victims of the Hollywood Machine. The gone girl supposedly at the centre of the tale is not so much a character in her own right but an excuse for the protagonist to indulge in his nostalgia, something we’ve seen far too often. To the film’s credit there are some wonderfully zany moments which should pique interests throughout (and in particular a short-lived horror villain which will probably give me nightmares). On the other hand, it’s hard to know whether the film’s scattergun approach works overall (I refuse to believe that R.E.M.’s “What’s the Frequency?” is anyone’s dance number). Perhaps the most surprising part of this Hollywood puzzler is just how conventional it is.

 

Sarah Cullen

139 minutes
16 (see IFCO for details)
Under the Silver Lake is released 15th March 2019

 

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‘Reel’ Representation in Foyle Film Festival’s Intercultural Programme

 

A curated selection of films from across the world highlighting diversity and equality will screen in Derry~Londonderry this month as part of the Foyle Film Festival’s Intercultural & Anti-Racism programme.

 

Running from Friday 15 March to Sunday 24 March in Nerve Centre and Brunswick Moviebowl, the annual programme offers both schools and the general public an opportunity to explore issues such as racism, homophobia, sexism and discrimination through the medium of film.

 

Highlights for primary school students include screenings of classic Disney® films such as Up! and The Princess & the Frog. Also screening is the Oscar® nominated film Mary Poppins Returns, which sees the formidable nanny return to the grief stricken Banks family to help save the day.

 

Post-primary screenings include the Oscar® nominated features Green Book and First Man, the former of which tells the important true story of the unlikely friendship that developed between a black concert pianist and the New York bouncer hired to chauffeur him through the unfriendly territory of the Jim Crow American South.

 

A special screening of Anne Frank Remembered marks the 90th anniversary of Anne Frank’s birth. Narrated by Kenneth Branagh and Glenn Close, the film features vintage newsreels, photographs and even a rare home movie to look beyond the pages of Anne’s diary. In surprising, often emotional interviews with Anne’s family, friends and her protector Miep Gies, Anne’s life serves once more as an unforgettable symbol of and tribute to the many lives lost in the Holocaust.

A full programme of evening screenings, open to the public, will run throughout the two weeks. The films tackle difficult themes, including child trafficking, institutional racism and extreme poverty.

 

Director Alan Gilsenan will present his groundbreaking drama, The Meeting, in Brunswick Moviebowl on Friday 29 March. Based on the true story of Ailbhe Griffith and the real life meeting between her and the man who, nine years earlier, subjected her to a horrific sexual assault. Ailbhe plays herself in the film and will take part in a post-screening discussion with Dr. Marie Keenan, a restorative justice practitioner.

 

Activist Jacqueline Walker and director Jon Pullman will be in attendance on Friday 15 March at a screening of WitchHunt, a documentary exploring anti-semitism in the Labour party.

 

Speaking about the programme, Bernie McLaughlin, Foyle Film Festival Director and Programme said: “Now in its 14th year, the Intercultural and Anti-Racism programme aims to broaden young people’s cultural awareness while also providing a platform for stories that promote tolerance and inclusion. We’ve brought together a wide-ranging programme of thought-provoking films and documentaries from around the world that will encourage some interesting conversations.”

 

Also screening are critically acclaimed features Love Sonia, BlacKKKlansman, Ray & Liz, The Wife and Border (Gräns).

 

Once again special screenings for those living with physical and mental challenges as well as parents and babies feature in the programme and include; Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again! and A Star Is Born, starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper. Films are screened in a more relaxed atmosphere, with low lighting, and complimentary tea, coffee and biscuits are served.

Tickets are now on sale at www.foylefilmfestival.org

 

Foyle Film Festival’s Intercultural & Anti-Racism Programme is funded by the Department for Communities through Northern Ireland Screen and venue partner is Brunswick Moviebowl.

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Review of Irish Film @ DIFF 2019: Floating Structures

June Butler takes a look at Fearghal Ward and Adrian Duncan’s Reel Art film, Floating Structures, which shines a light on buildings and structures that seem as though they have emerged from another world. 

Floating Structures is an ambient architectural feast that focuses mainly on edifices where glass is considered an essential part of the project.

It follows a narrator as he travels to investigate the creation of German civil engineer Heinrich Gottfried Gerber. Gerber conceived of, and designed cantilevered bridges over the Regnitz at Bamberg and traversing the Main at Hassfurt. Elements of both conduits were then ably used by Peter Rice, an Irish structural engineer in the construction of a number of notable landmarks.

The audience is brought through the assembly of such buildings as the Pompidou Centre (1971), and La Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie, Villette (1986) – both in Paris. However Rice can also lay claim to working on construction of the Sydney Opera House roof (1957), the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield (1967), and Pabellón del Futuro, Seville, Spain (1992). Rice integrated Gerber’s structural concepts and incorporated them seamlessly into the buildings he worked on. La Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie featured three greenhouse spaces in the façade which were deemed to be the first glass walls positioned without a frame or supporting fins. Footage from the time of assembly shows Peter Rice putting the glass in place.

What follows is a beautiful journey into the marvels of creation narrated easily in lay-person’s terms – a passage to unfettered imagination. The documentary encourages an interest in maps of the mind and lends visual meaning to the concrete landscape surrounding city dwellers. Both the old and the new are investigated – parallels are drawn between Chartres Cathedral and more modern buildings, concluding that while materials used on recent constructs differ, the overall supposition is that the law of physics remains the same.

Floating Structures is a quiet and unassuming foray into celebrating the genius of Peter Rice and well worth viewing.

 

Floating Structures screened on 25th February 2019 as part of the Dublin International Film Festival (20th February – 3rd March). 

 

 

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Nick McLean

The legendary cinematographer Nick McLean is currently in Ireland for a series of events honouring his work.  We were fortunate enough to have Nick join us to chat with Paul Farren about his illustrious career. Nick is joined by film historian Wayne Byrne, who co-authored a book with Nick which details McLean’s life and work on some of the biggest films and television shows of the past fifty years.

Nick takes us inside Hollywood and shares some fabulous stories, working with the likes of Steven Spielberg, Robert Altman, Vilmos Zsigmond, László Kovács, Brian De Palma, Burt Reynolds, Warren Beatty, Hal Ashby, Clint Eastwood, Mel Brooks, Richard Donner on The Goonies and Superman and working on Friends.

 

Events

March 8 – Triskel Arts Centre (Short Circuit film screening + Q&A; Cobra film screening + Introduction)
March 9 – The Harbour Hotel (An Audience with Nick McLean Masterclass)
                – Palas Cinema (The Goonies film screening + Q&A)
March 11 – The Sugar Club (Spaceballs film screening + Introduction and Q&A)
March 15 – Naas Community Library (An Evening with Nick McLean)
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‘Her Name Is…’ Wins at WFT Ireland Short Film Showcase

Claire Byrne, Juanita Wilson & Lydia McGuinness

 

WFT Ireland announced the winners of their members’ Short Film Showcase 2019, held in the IFI on Wednesday 6th March. The event was organised in partnership with the IFI, and with the support of the BAI, to celebrate International Women’s Day.

The judges selected No Place as the second runner up. This short was written and directed by Laura Kavanagh and produced by Laura, Emily Morgan and Barry Ward. A timely short, No Place tells the story of Angela and her two young kids as they are evicted from their home. Angela struggles to maintain a sense of normality as an increasingly desperate situation unfolds.

Second place was awarded to The Girl at the End of the Garden, a comedy drama about an unhappy young girl whose life is turned upside-down when she finds a mysterious runaway with psychic powers in her back garden. The Girl at the End of the Garden was directed by Bonnie Dempsey, written by Rodney Lee and produced by Sinead Barry and David O’Sullivan.

Her Name Is…

The winner of the overall competition was Her Name Is… directed by Lydia McGuinness and Claire Byrne. This heartbreaking short was written by Lydia and Ben Conway, and produced by Jo Halpin and Emma Wall of Alfonso Films. Her Name Is… follows an isolated young woman on her journey through the city streets in a final act of desperation.

The filmmakers were presented with prizes on the night by special guest, Oscar nominated filmmaker, Juanita Wilson.

Juanita Wilson, Susan Liddy, Vanessa Gildea

WFT Chair Dr. Susan Liddy said: “Our Short Film Showcase is an affirmation of the talented women working in the industry today. We were struck by the range of films submitted and, indeed, the range of filmmakers – from more established names to emerging voices. WFT is immensely proud to have hosted this wonderful evening to highlight our female talent. We’d like to thank Sunniva O Flynn and the IFI team for embracing the event and the BAI for their continued support. We were overwhelmed by the huge audience on the night and the enthusiastic commitment by female filmmakers to stand their ground, tell their stories and make their mark in the Irish film industry. And WFT will be there to support them all the way”.

 

 

 

 

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Irish Experimental Sci-fi Feature to Premiere in New York

The world premiere of experimental, soundtrack-driven sci-fi Assimilation will take place at the 2019 Philip K. Dick Science Fiction Film Festival, to be held in New York this week, on March 6th and 9th. Filmed in Derry and Donegal and produced by Scalp Mountain Productions, Assimilation marks the feature debut both for Irish writer/director John Norby and star Ashling Vieira.

In the near future, exponential growth in technology creates an apocalyptic event of cosmic origins that finds Earth seemingly devoid of all sentient life. Assimilation depicts the stages leading up to that event and follows the journey of a lone survivor on her quest to reconnect with life: to discover what lies beyond.

Where are we headed, this human race, and what is our fate after Earth? The clues are there to be discovered; it’s all about knowing where to look.

What will you see?

Presented without dialogue, Assimilation features an immersive, darkly atmospheric soundtrack by some of the most respected dark ambient artists from around the world. The film strives through its ‘sight and sound’ approach to captivate its audience and transport them into the post-apocalyptic world it portrays, allowing them to explore it intimately as the experience unfolds.
The production of Assimilation was unique in that the soundtrack was in place before shooting began, indicating the importance of the music and its intricate relationship with the action in driving the story. The soundtrack features music by Lamia Vox, Sistrenatus, Red Harvest, Phelios, Virus, Triangular Ascension, Dahlia’s Tear, Øysnsasid, Christopher Norby, Posthum, Endvra, Necro Deathmort, O Yuki Conjugate, Zoät-Aon, and The Axis Of Perdition. Put together they provide an ethereal cinematic experience that reveals the profound and chilling story of Assimilation.
Assimilation will play at The Producer’s Club, 358 West 44th Street, New York, on Saturday, March 9. Screening time is 9pm. Q&A with director John Norby after the show.

Tickets and info available from www.thephilipkdickfilmfestival.com

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Review of Irish Film @ DIFF 2019: Gaza

Irene Falvey reflects on Gaza, Garry Keane and Andrew McConnell’s documentary, set among the communities who live in Gaza.

 

Gaza, a documentary portraying the reality of people’s lives in Gaza, is introduced at its screening during the Dublin International Film Festival by Garry Keane and Andrew McConnell who worked on this documentary together. It is clear from their introduction that this joint project required commitment as the production spanned from 2015-2018. The filmmakers’ perseverance was not in vain as this documentary provides an eye-opening insight into the world of everyday people living in Gaza.

In place of documenting the relentless political turmoil in this location, Keane and McConnell’s documentary looks at Gaza from a personal rather than a political point of view. It successfully encapsulates the human response to living in this conflicted space, revealing both defiance and uncrushable human will alongside frustration and fear. Throughout the documentary, the filmmakers record a collection of people from different walks of life, all sharing the same land and the same seemingly hopeless situation. The viewer witnesses a mixture of responses and coping mechanisms that the civilians assume, with an emphasis on humanity and understanding.

To commence the documentary we are given a synopsis of the situation in Gaza, a densely populated strip of land, with closed borders on either side. While there is a long and tense history to be examined here, the film focuses instead on those that are really affected by these events – the people. With this context in mind the documentary can be viewed as an examination of survival, both physically and mentally. How can a community carry on when their basic human needs aren’t being met? How can a community live in a space that is constantly inflicted by war? While the documentary doesn’t shy away from these subjects, it concentrates more closely on the coping mechanisms of the people themselves living in Gaza; it is clear that this is all the civilians can do, to aspire to cope rather than to live.

One of the main themes threaded throughout the documentary is the sea. Initially the sea is depicted as a symbol of freedom. One participant in the film, an educated fourteen-year-old girl called Karma, sees the hopelessness of her situation but says that the sea provides some solace. The sea in the context of this documentary can be seen as a horizon, that there exists a more free life outside of this trapped state. However, the horizon here is a conflicted one; it is an unreachable horizon, a horizon that is off limits. This unattainable border is both symbolic and real – there is a 3 mile border limitation on this sea front.

One of the first people we are introduced to in the film is a young fourteen-year- old boy whose greatest dream is to one day own a fishing boat and be the captain. His life expectations demonstrate that the sea is a barrier rather than a symbol of freedom. Growing up in the context of Gaza, how is an uneducated boy to imagine anything greater on his horizon than captaining a ship that can go no further than three miles?

In the face of adversity one of the most common human reactions is to take action. In the context of Gaza, however, the film portrays this being an unwise choice. Young frustrated men make violent attempts to bring about change with gunshots and stone-throwing, only to end up injured and feeling even more ineffectual.

For several people in the film they fight against the adversity by expressing their emotions through music instead of violence. Karma, a fourteen-year-old girl who dreams of winning a scholarship, finds escapism through playing the cello. While music won’t lift the barriers or stop the difficulties of life in Gaza, it manages to bring some peace and harmony to those that must endure their lives there. We witness an injured young man who becomes a rap artist,  to ensure that he isn’t “a burden to society”. A taxi driver, whose life we follow, sings with many of his passengers, using music as a universal language to strengthen the spirits no matter what strife they must struggle through.

In a place where a community can’t freely come and go as they please, the idea of Gaza as a prison is clearly established within the documentary. The people within Gaza could be viewed as innocent prisoners sentenced and confined, despite not being guilty of any crimes. In a place where education, jobs, electricity and food are in short supply there is a sense of a frustrated acceptance – while the people are resilient, they are also  aware that their situation isn’t going to change any time soon.

While the documentary successfully reveals the strength of these people in the face of hardship, the desperation of the situation they are going through remains constantly present.

The film creatively switches the context of the current situation in Gaza from the political to the personal to show the real effects of the relentless conflict. We witness a people and place that are trapped and frustrated yet ever on the verge of turmoil. Despite the severity of the situation, the documentary shines a light on the pervasive sense of humanity of those that are striving to survive in Gaza. With understanding and sympathy the filmmakers have managed to capture how the toils of war shape the lives of people who are trapped by it.

 

 

Gaza screened on 2nd March 2019 as part of the Dublin International Film Festival (20th February – 3rd March).

 


 

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Review: Captain Marvel

 

DIR: Anna Boden, Ryan Fleck  WRI: Anna Boden, Ryan Fleck, Geneva Robertson-Dworet  PRO: Kevin Feige  DOP: Ben Davis  ED: Debbie Berman Elliot Graham • DES: Andy Nicholson  MUS: Pinar Toprak • CAST: Brie Larson, Gemma Chan, Samuel L. Jackson

Finally the Marvel year has begun with Captain Marvel. Signalled at the end of Avengers: Infinity War (if you stayed to the very end of the credits) and soon to be playing a major role in Avengers: Endgame, which means completists and uber fans will be checking this film out as they get all salivated for the upcoming main event.  For trivia fans I should note that Captain Marvel is also the second period Marvel movie since Captain America: The First Avenger.

Opening on the Kree planet, Hala, we find our heroine dealing with amnesia, fractured memories of some possible past and a set of super powers she is only learning to use.  Seemingly she is a Kree warrior fighting the good fight against the Skrull, shape-shifting enemies of the Kree empire. The Kree are a sort of Roman Empire in space and the centre of their power system is a deity-like AI, The Supreme Intelligence, a mysterious entity that communes with individuals in the guise of someone important to them.  After a meeting with The Supreme Intelligence, Vers, as she is known at this point, (Trekkies will get a kick out of this one) goes on her first mission, the rescue of a Kree spy from one of the Kree border planets. One Skrull infiltration, capture and escape later finds Vers plummeted to Earth, trashing a Blockbuster video shop in the process.  Soon she is finding clues to her past life and also the mission in hand as Skrull warriors pursue her. Joining her on this voyage of rediscovery for the buddy cop portion of the film is a bright eyed, two-eyed Nick Fury.

Like its recent rival Wonder Woman, Captain Marvel has a girl-power message running through the heart of it. Where Captain Marvel succeeds over Wonder Woman is in not having any love interest distracting from the heroine’s stake in the story.  Best of all it gets its agenda across without hampering with the narrative, though the speechifying could have been dropped a notch or two.

Like all of its predecessors, this is a slick affair and certainly worth a visit to the cinema if you are a fan.  A fun but uneven ride, plot logic certainly drops along the way and it is hampered by some pedestrian moments running alongside some really good ones.  I personally don’t get the Brie Larson thing, she’s fine in her role as the good Captain but that’s all I can really say about her performance. Annette Bening excels in her extended cameo, Ben Mendelsohn as the Skrull leader gets more laughs than you might expect from a Skrull, Jackson is also in good form as his younger self with the aid of some Fountain of Youth CGI, but I don’t think the bill for the VFX would have been as high as the ones for Michael Douglas or Kurt Russell’s wrinkle removal. Finally, it’s worth noting that this is the first Marvel film to be released since Stan Lee’s passing, a nice tribute is made to him right at the beginning and a really poignant cameo appears in the film that those who know why will love. Excelsior.

Paul Farren

123 minutes
12A (see IFCO for details)
Captain Marvel is released 1st March 2019

 

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Call For: Applications for EFP Producers on the Move 2019

Call for Applications: EFP Producers on the Move 2019

Fís Éireann/Screen Ireland is now seeking applications from Irish producers who wish to be considered as the Irish representative for the 2019 EFP Producers on the Move programme held each year at the Cannes Film Festival.

Each year, 20 up and coming producers from 20 different countries from throughout Europe are selected to participate in Producers on the Move at the Cannes Film Festival. The four-day programme aims at connecting enterprising young producers with international potential co-production partners and strengthening their industry networks. The programme is underpinned by a digital promotion campaign and a press campaign in the international trades, creating visibility and opportunity for the producers.

The programme is open to 20 producers from 20 different European countries. The interested producers/production companies must have completed at least one international co-production.  The final selection of the 20 participants is based on a point system which considers the following criteria:

  • the producer’s experience in an international co-production (at least one international co-production) is a pre-requisite. The selection process favours producers who have been majority producers.
    If candidates were the majority producers in more than three international co-productions, they, unfortunately, are too experienced for PRODUCERS ON THE MOVE
  • the producer’s feature length film(s) have had a theatrical release and /or a VoD / SVoD / DVD / TV release outside of the production countries involved;
  • the producer has had a feature length film screened in the international section at a major festival;
  • the producer’s feature length film was awarded Best Film in the producer’s home country ie recipient of a national film award;
  • the producer has a strong project suitable for an international co-production.

Previous Irish Producers on the Move include Alan Maher (Song of Granite), Katie Holly (Vita & Virginia), John Keville and Conor Barry (The Hole in the Ground), Juliette Bonass (A Date for Mad Mary), Rebecca O’Flanagan (Papi Chulo) and Macdara Kelleher (Black 47) to name but a few.

If you are interested in participating in Producers on the Move 2019, please address your email to Louise Ryan, Marketing & Communications Manager, marketing@screenireland.ie with the following information by close on business on Tuesday, 12 March:

  1. Letter of motivation, i.e. what you would hope to gain from the scheme and why you would like to take part
  2. Project description of the film in development / financing — including synopsis and director statement (if director attached)
  3. Finance plan for this project

http://filmireland.net/2019/01/02/festivals-funding-schemes-deadlines-2015/

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The Arts Council Announces Successful recipients of Authored Works and Reel Art awards

 

The Arts Council announces successful recipients of Authored Works and Reel Art awards

The Arts Council has announced the successful recipients of its 2018 Authored Works and Reel Art Awards. 

Dónal Foreman is the first film artist to be selected for the new Authored Works award, while Vivienne Dick and Ciara Nic Chormaic are the latest recipients of Reel Art awards.

Authored Works is a new Arts Council initiative which is designed to provide film artists with the creative and editorial freedom to make an authored cultural film work. The successful project will premiere at the IFI in 2020.

Reel Art is the Arts Council’s long-running creative arts documentary scheme. The two successful films will premiere at the Dublin International Film Festival in February 2020.

The Arts Council wishes to congratulate all three artists on their awards and we look forward to seeing the films reaching Irish and international audiences on their completion.

Authored Works Award

Queen of Fire
Director: Dónal Foreman
Producer: Alan Maher

Donal Foreman 3

A middle-aged American filmmaker, reeling from the death of her mother, enlists the help of a younger Irish writer on a journey along the Irish west coast to research a film about Ireland’s pre-colonial past. Queen of Fire is a dense and sensuous mix of road movie, psychodrama and historical essay that gradually pulls itself apart as lines blur between past and present, dream and reality…

Dónal Foreman has written, directed and edited two feature films and dozens of shorts, and presented his work at festivals including Rotterdam, Edinburgh, the Viennale and CPH:DOX. He has been nominated for the Rising Star award at the Irish Film & TV Awards and awarded the Grand Prize of the Avant-Garde Competition at BAFICI in Argentina. His most recent feature, The Image You Missed (Arts Council Film Project Award), has won nine awards at festivals internationally, including six top prizes, and has been acclaimed by the Hollywood Reporter, Film Comment and Sight & Sound. For more info, please visit www.donalforeman.com.

Reel Art Awards

New York Our Time
Director: Vivienne Dick
Produced by: Still Films and Jellyfish Productions

Vivienne Dick3New York Our Time is an intimate and philosophical documentary that contrasts the concerns of present day with the bohemian wildness of ’70s New York in the lives of ‘No Wave’ artists and musicians.

The film will feature the director along with friends of hers from her time in New York, including Lydia Lunch, Nan Goldin and Alexis Adler. The soundtrack will include diverse music and archive from the period as well as new compositions and collaborations.

Vivienne Dick makes multilayered, open-ended work framed from a female perspective and with an interest in sexual politics, music and philosophy. Her early work is associated with the No Wave film and music movement of late seventies New York. Her work has been shown extensively at festivals and museums such as, MoMa New York, Lisbon Estoril and Filmhaus Vienna with a survey of her work at IMMA in 2017. Retrospectives include Crawford (2009) Tate Modern (2010) and SEFF Seville (2016). Her work is in the collections of The Irish Film Archive, Lux, Anthology Archives and The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Her work is distributed by LUX UK.

Skin+Soul
Director: Ciara Nic Chormaic
Producer: Sharon Whooley

Ciara Nic Chormaic3Skin+Soul is a cinematic meditation on fashion photography seen through the lens of photographer Perry Ogden whose profound images blur the boundaries between the fashion world and the real world.

Ciara Nic Chormaic created, directed and produced a documentary series exploring Irish fashion identity entitled Snáithe (Thread) which recently screened in New York and London. For over fifteen years she has produced award winning documentaries which have premiered at Irish and international film festivals including Name Your Poison/Deoch an Dorais and The Hood and the Collar.

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Screen Leaders 2019

Screen Leaders is the strategic company development programme for the screen industries that can transform businesses.

  • Is your company going through a period of change or growth?
  • Do you want to internationalise your business?
  • Do you need to re-define the scope of your business?
  • Is it time to frame your company vision?

Designed for company leaders working in film, television, animation, games, post-production, VFX, facilities, sales, distribution and exhibition, the programme, which has been running successfully for over 10 years, is funded by Creative Europe MEDIA, Screen Skills Ireland and Screen Ireland.

The Screen Leaders programme will provide you and your company with the skills to lead and grow the organisation in a complex, innovative and evolving international marketplace with a mixture of residential week-long workshops and one to one sessions from June to November 2019.

From its inaugural programme in 2008 to the present, Screen Leaders has had participants from all over Ireland and Europe from leading animation, TV and film production companies. Some of them have progressed to becoming leading production companies in their respective countries as well as participating in the screen industries on a global scale. You can search through Screen Leaders Alumni here – their  collective achievements and awards include over 20 total Oscar nominations, more than 15 Golden Globes nominations, 10 Emmy nominations and countless international festival prizes, awards and recognitions.

WHEN DOES THE PROGRAMME TAKE PLACE?

Running from June to November, there are three modules, with ongoing one-to-one feedback between sessions.

  • Module 1: Residential in Limerick, Ireland: 3rd – 7th June 2019
  • Module 2: Strategy and Finance Business Coaching in Dublin, Ireland: 23rd – 24th and 26th – 27th August 2019
  • Strategy and Leaderships Business Coaching in Ireland/Germany: September TBC 2019
  • Module 3: Residential in Tallinn, Estonia:  10th – 14th November 2019

The deadline for applications is Friday the 19th of April 2019.

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