Dance Talks: Screendance: Small Crew – Great Production

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Date:

Thu 18 Feb 2016

Time:

18:00 – 19:00

Venue:

DanceHouse

Admission:

Free – RSVP Required

The majority of dance films must be realised with a small crew due to budget constraints.  Dance Ireland has invited Lisa Tighe and Cáit Ní Dhuinnín to speak from their experience of their recently completed film with just the two of them making up the entire crew.  In conversation will be Mary Wycherley, who has the rare experience of working with both small and large budgets when it comes to dance and film.  Key topics that will be touched on include:

  • Balancing the need for high quality dance film production while working with small budgets.
  • Managing budget wisely without compromising your production quality – Making essential choices
  • What (and who) makes up a small crew?
  • How careful planning/ scripting your dance film saves you money.
  • Considering (and appreciating) the creative freedoms, opportunities and space for spontaneity which can come with smaller productions.

 

Lisa’s and Cáit’s film, Dublin, a city speaks of love will be shown from 15-19 February on the Mezzanine level of DanceHouse for anyone who wishes to drop by and take a look.

Mary Wycherley will be offering workshops on Friday 19 February in choreography for camera.  The morning session will cater to artists and teachers looking to break into this area, and how to do a lot with a little.  The afternoon session will be geared towards those working on a project, or involved in the field at a more advanced stage.  Get in touch for more information!

Speakers:

Cáit Ní Dhuinnín is a visual artist, filmmaker and teacher from Cork. Usually working as an installation artist, over the past two years she has moved into the area of screendance. She continues to develop her practice, particularly through collaborative projects. Her ongoing work explores the physical bodily engagement with the geography and ecology of place. In 2014 Cáit had a film selected for Light Moves festival of screendance in Limerick, the film Clais was a collaboration with dance artist Siobhán Ní Dhuinnín.

Lisa Tighe is a Independent Dance Artist and Teacher based in Dublin and has worked with various dance artists and companies including Irish Modern Dance Theatre, Protein Dance Company (UK), Liz Roche (IRL), John Jasperse (USA) and Emma Martin Dance (IRL). Lisa was Dance Artist in Residence 2013/14 at RUA RED South Dublin Arts Centre, during which she choreographed her solo piece ‘Story Time’. The creation of this solo inspired her to take her first steps into the area of screendance focussing on details of movement and expression and the relationship between the dancer and environment.

 

Mary Wycherley is a dance artist whose work embraces live performance, choreography and film. In 2015 Mary was appointed Limerick Dance Artist in Residence by the Arts Council of Ireland, a year in which she also premiered In The Bell’s Shadow, a feature length screendance film made in collaboration with choreographer Joan Davis and scored for the Irish Chamber Orchestra by Jürgen Simpson. Her installation work includes a diptych Starting With T, a community project made in collaboration with Mary Nunan and Monica Spencer, funded by Limerick City of Culture 2014, and a triptych The Dance of Making (2012) funded by the Arts Council of Ireland. In 2013 Mary premiered Frames & Fragments and Contour, two Dance Ireland commissions. Her work has been shown at festivals and galleries including the National Museum of Contemporary Arts Bucharest, The American Dance Festival, The Solas Nua Arts Centre Washington, VideoDanza Festival Buenos Aires and at home, including the Galway Film Fleadh, the Kilkenny Arts Festival, West Cork Art Centre, RUA RED Gallery, Fab Lab (Limerick City Gallery off-site exhibition), Fastnet Film Festival, the Firkin Crane, and the Light House Cinema Dublin. She is a director and curator of Light Moves festival of screendance and a guest lecturer in dance and film at the IWAMD, University of Limerick.

 

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